• These findings suggest that auditory verbal hallucination resembles verbal imagery in language processing, but without the involvement of the supplementary motor area, which may subserve the sense of ownership of one's own verbal imagery. (aalto.fi)
  • Our study provides further evidence of the high prevalence of auditory hallucinations in pre-pubertal children presenting to psychiatric clinics. (springer.com)
  • Edelsohn GA, Rabinovich H, Portnoy R (2003) Hallucinations in non-psychotic children: findings from a psychiatric emergency service. (springer.com)
  • Hallucinations are often manifestations of severe psychiatric conditions seen clinically. (springer.com)
  • French physician Alexandre-Jacques-François Brierre de Boismont in 1845 described many instances of hallucinations associated with intense concentration, or with musing, or simply occurring in the course of psychiatric disorder . (britannica.com)
  • Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler (1857-1939) defined hallucinations as "perceptions without corresponding stimuli from without," while the Psychiatric Dictionary in 1940 referred to hallucination as the "apparent perception of an external object when no such object is present. (britannica.com)
  • I'd like to know if there's any psychiatric illness that causes complete hallucinations. (absolutewrite.com)
  • Evers and Ellgers compiled a significant portion of musical hallucination articles, case studies etc. and were able to categorize five major etiologies: Hypoacusis Psychiatric disorders Focal brain lesion Epilepsy Intoxication Hypoacusis is defined as impairment in hearing or deafness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hallucinations also differ from " delusional perceptions", in which a correctly sensed and interpreted stimulus (i.e., a real perception) is given some additional (and typically absurd) significance. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a stricter sense, hallucinations are defined as perceptions in a conscious and awake state in the absence of external stimuli which have qualities of real perception, in that they are vivid, substantial, and located in external objective space. (princeton.edu)
  • Hallucinations are incorrect perceptions of objects or events involving the senses. (alzheimer.ca)
  • Each hallucination mentioned in the novel has, at least as a suggestion, a neurological basis, from epilepsy to excitation in various places to damage in the areas that affect sight. (bookrags.com)
  • Sacks has both personal and third hand stories of the hallucinations present in a variety of situations, and in all cases, a neurological basis can be found. (bookrags.com)
  • Analyses of hallucinations reported by sufferers of neurological disorders and by neurosurgical patients in whom the brain is stimulated electrically have shown the importance of the temporal lobes (at the sides of the brain) to auditory hallucinations, for example, and of other functionally relevant parts of the brain in this process. (britannica.com)
  • Various neurological conditions and brain injuries can cause auditory hallucinations. (wisegeek.com)
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy or brain injury can lead to phantosmia, or olfactory hallucinations, during which one detects pleasing or foul smells (e.g. fresh flowers or rotting flesh) that are not actually present. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Hallucinations can affect any of the senses, although certain diseases or disorders are associated with specific types of hallucinations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Researchers from Cambridge University in conjunction with Cardiff University have determined that the human mind is capable of producing the types of hallucinations often experienced by people with psychotic disorders in an attempt to give us some insight as to what to expect next. (hightimes.com)
  • LICHTMAN: One of the other types of hallucinations that seems relevant here is that people hallucinate, I read in "Hallucinations," your book, people that they've lost, people who have died who have been in their lives. (kazu.org)
  • For example, in schizophrenic patients who are prone to hallucinations, neuroimaging shows changes in the activity of pathways connecting the frontal and temporal lobes. (scienceblogs.com)
  • However, one interpretation may be that those students who were more prone to hallucinations used caffeine to help cope with their experiences. (dur.ac.uk)
  • In the last half of the 19th century, studies of hallucinations continued. (britannica.com)
  • If these psychomarkers are a valid alternative for neuro-imaging-derived biomarkers, personalized treatment of hallucinations can be provided in all treatment setting without the need for technical facilities or academic know-how. (zonmw.nl)
  • What is amazing is the nature of these beautiful static hallucinations,together with the intensity of the 3 d effect. (bio.net)
  • As a control, the neural activity evoked by the flashes was compared to the activity that occurs in response to light stimuli of higher or lower frequencies that do not induce hallucinations. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The Boston Globe , in what seems like a strange attempt at a public awareness campaign, has published a poster of things you can do at home to induce hallucinations. (medgadget.com)
  • Hallucinations involve sensing things such as visions, sounds, or smells that seem real but are not. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Not a supernatural source, but a cerebral source, where the images emerge naturally from the structure of the brain, and work their way into all visual art forms, even those that do not involve drugs or hallucinations. (bradshawfoundation.com)
  • I saw my psychiatrist soon after the hallucinations started and was given a series of Geodone shots and as the episode progressed the hallucinations went away and I haven't experienced them since. (psychcentral.com)
  • She, being a practical woman, asks a psychiatrist what kind of illness could be triggering those hallucinations, since she wants to take the right meds to make the visions stop. (absolutewrite.com)
  • Although the patient was taking other medications at the same time, the timing of onset and offset suggested that amantadine either had a synergistic effect with the other drugs or simply caused the hallucinations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychologist Dr. Scott T Wilson breaks down the cognitive and emotional repercussions of extended periods of sensory deprivation, and explains the nature of bizarre hallucinations ranging from flashes of light to full-blown encounters and narratives. (discovery.com)
  • The exact pathogenesis of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease is not known but an integrated model has been proposed that includes impaired visual input and central visual processing, impaired brainstem regulation of sleep-wake cycle with fluctuating vigilance, intrusion of rapid eye movement dream imagery into wakefulness and emergence of internally generated imagery, cognitive dysfunction and influence of dopaminergic drugs. (nih.gov)
  • In a clinical study, we assessed motor and non-motor function, including sleep, mood, autonomic and global, frontal and visuoperceptive cognitive function in patients with and without visual hallucinations. (nih.gov)
  • When corrected for multiple comparisons, patients with visual hallucinations had significantly greater disease duration, treatment duration, motor severity and complications, sleep disturbances, in particular excessive daytime somnolence and rapid eye movement sleep behavioural disorder, disorders of mood, autonomic dysfunction and global, frontal and visuoperceptive cognitive dysfunction. (nih.gov)
  • Using a comprehensive assessment of the clinical, demographic and ophthalmological correlates of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, the combined data support the hypothesized model of impaired visual processing, sleep-wake dysregulation and brainstem dysfunction, and cognitive, particularly frontal, impairment all independently contributing to the pathogenesis of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. (nih.gov)
  • By 1838 the significant relationship between the content of dreams and of hallucinations had been pointed out. (britannica.com)
  • Sigmund Freud 's concepts of conscious and unconscious activities added new significance to the content of dreams and hallucinations. (britannica.com)
  • If such a constantly shifting balance exists between internal and external environmental forces, physiological considerations (e.g., brain function) as well as cultural and experiential factors emerge as major determinants of the content and meaning of hallucinations. (britannica.com)