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  • adverse effects
  • The findings indicate that use of blunt needles was associated with statistically significant reductions in PI rates, minimal clinically apparent adverse effects on patient care, and general acceptance by gynecologic surgeons in these hospitals. (cdc.gov)
  • curved suture
  • The mean number of curved suture needles used per procedure (24 needles) was constant throughout the study period. (cdc.gov)
  • The increase in use of blunt suture needles was temporally associated with a decrease in PIs from curved suture needles, from 5.9 PIs per 100 procedures (49 PIs among 835 procedures) in 1993 to 1.1 PIs per 100 procedures (seven PIs among 629 procedures) in 1994 (p less than 0.01) ( Figure_1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Rates of PIs with devices other than curved suture needles remained constant (2.1 PIs per 100 procedures). (cdc.gov)
  • mortality
  • Although this procedure is highly successful in curing the disease of concern, it is a surgical alternative with the accompanying risks, morbidity, and mortality that an operative procedure carries and it leads to sterility in women who are premenopausal. (drmessore.com)
  • post operative
  • Post-surgical patients may communicate pain information differently depending on who asks them, particularly in the early post-operative period. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The study hypothesis is as follows: subcuticular (buried) sutures as compared to surgical staples lead to decreased post-operative pain and improved cosmetic result. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • outpatient
  • By the end of 2010, outpatient procedures accounted for more than 50% of all surgeries performed in the U.S., compared with an estimated 30% in 2000. (gii.co.jp)
  • care
  • Cape Cod Healthcare offers women access to the high level of innovative and skilled surgical care you would expect from a major urban medical center, close to home. (capecodhealth.org)
  • I am honored to have the opportunity to provide obstetric and gynecologic care for my patients. (healthgrades.com)
  • Whenever
  • Whenever post-surgical patients provided different VAS scores for pain level to RNs and MDs, the higher pain reading was always reported to the MD. CONCLUSION: This study identified important variances in subjective pain reporting by patients that appeared to be influenced by who sampled the data. (biomedsearch.com)