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  • amlodipine
  • Amlodipine, which is approximately 80% bioavailable, is hardly affected by grapefruit. (cmaj.ca)
  • I therefore tend to tell patients on amlodipine and atorvastatin that grapefruit is likely to have only a minor effect. (cmaj.ca)
  • antioxidant
  • The researchers then used a second group of mice to compare the effects of grapefruit juice, naringin (a flavonoid antioxidant present in grapefruits) and metformin (a drug that lowers blood sugar for people with diabetes). (www.nhs.uk)
  • enzymes
  • Grapefruit juice, meanwhile, has the ability to block intestinal enzymes that break down sirolimus and other drugs, hence the warnings from pharmacists about taking it with certain medication. (ibtimes.com)
  • The variation in potency of the grapefruit juice itself may be far greater than the variation in the enzymes that break down sirolimus,' Cohen said. (ibtimes.com)
  • Chemicals in grapefruit and grapefruit juice block these enzymes and disrupt their function. (livestrong.com)
  • Grapefruit juice inhibits certain enzymes in the intestinal walls that otherwise would slow many drugs from entering the bloodstream. (scientificamerican.com)
  • We have at our disposal an agent that can markedly increase bioavailability (in this study by approximately 350 percent) and … decrease prescription drug spending on many agents metabolized by P450 enzymes,' those gut enzymes that grapefruit juice blocks, the authors wrote in their report. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Tart
  • Tart and tangy with an underlying sweetness, grapefruit has a juiciness that rivals that of the ever popular orange and sparkles with many of the same health promoting benefits. (whfoods.com)
  • Finishes with grapefruit, tart and dry. (ratebeer.com)
  • medication
  • But a group of University of Chicago researchers now says that grapefruit juice's ability to raise drug levels in the bloodstream could mean that cancer patients could take lower doses of sirolimus, which could help them avoid side effects and save money on medication. (ibtimes.com)
  • You can stop eating grapefruit for the duration of your medication course. (livestrong.com)
  • A 2004 review in "American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs" reported that grapefruit and grapefruit juice interfere with the action of CYP3A4, thus reducing Levitra's first pass metabolism and permitting more of the medication to pass into your bloodstream. (livestrong.com)
  • This is not a complete list, so if you’re a grapefruit fan, check with your doctor before starting any medication. (drugs.com)
  • But the researchers added that tests on enzyme levels could determine, with reasonably accuracy, how well a patient would respond to medication accompanied by grapefruit juice. (scientificamerican.com)
  • interfere
  • Grapefruit may interfere with the metabolism of some antibiotics. (livestrong.com)
  • According to scientists at London Health Sciences Centre in Ontario, Canada, in the 2004 "American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs," grapefruit can interfere with Levitra's metabolism for at least 24 hours. (livestrong.com)
  • lettuce
  • The lettuce and grapefruit can be prepared up to 1 day ahead, bagged separately and refrigerated. (countryliving.com)
  • The "grapefruit diet "came into vogue in the 1970s, to the point that, according to the Department of Agriculture of the United States, consumption of grapefruit in New York in 1983 reached fifth place in the ranking of the most purchased fresh fruit after potatoes, lettuce, oranges and apples. (botanical-online.com)
  • CALIFORNIA
  • The study was carried out by researchers from the University of California and was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative, although it had no role in the study design, data collection, analysis or decision to publish. (www.nhs.uk)
  • None of the reports seemed to mention that the work was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative. (www.nhs.uk)
  • When I lived in California, we didn't just have grapefruits, we had everything, from Oroblancos , to tangelos and pomelos. (davidlebovitz.com)
  • sirolimus
  • Grapefruit juice is known to increase the levels of the drug sirolimus in a patient's blood, which is why doctors advise patients against taking the two in tandem. (ibtimes.com)
  • University of Chicago researcher Ezra Cohen, the lead author of a new study in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, said in a statement Tuesday that he and his colleagues 'wanted to see if grapefruit juice can be used in a controlled fashion to increase the availability and efficacy of sirolimus. (ibtimes.com)
  • Researchers at University of Chicago Medicine found that a glass of grapefruit juice so improved the body's uptake of a potent drug called sirolimus that they could cut the drug dosage by a third to reach the same desired effect as a full dose. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Those drinking grapefruit juice , however, needed only about 25 to 35 mg per week of sirolimus. (scientificamerican.com)
  • knife
  • Use a chef's knife to cut the grapefruit rinds in quarters crossways (rather than lengthwise), then into strips about 1/4-inch (.75cm) wide. (davidlebovitz.com)
  • diet
  • It reports on a study in which mice fed a combination of a high-fat diet and grapefruit juice still put on weight - albeit at a lower rate than mice fed a sugary drink. (www.nhs.uk)
  • To investigate if grapefruit juice has an effect on diet-induced obesity, mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers then continued to feed the mice the high-fat diet with either the grapefruit juice or sweetened water described above. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Grapefruit is an incredibly healthy food to include in your diet. (healthline.com)
  • This isn't to say that grapefruit will produce weight loss on its own, but adding it to an already healthy diet may prove to be beneficial. (healthline.com)
  • found
  • An article published in Hospital Pharmacy found 23 drinks with grapefruit in them, five of them which didn't have the word grapefruit in the name! (livestrong.com)
  • A study in Drug Metabolism and Disposition (ref 5 January 2006, Drug Metabolism and Disposition) found that grapefruit, black mulberry, wild grape, pomegranate and black raspberry could also cause issues with antibiotics. (livestrong.com)
  • It is not clear how the dose of naringenin given to the mice relates to a potential human dose, or to the average amount found in a grapefruit. (www.nhs.uk)
  • For instance, one study found that participants experienced a reduced waist size when they consumed grapefruit daily with their meals ( 20 , 21 ). (healthline.com)
  • consumption
  • There are many types of antibiotics, and not all of them will be affected by grapefruit consumption but only your doctor will be able to tell you what's right for you. (livestrong.com)
  • amounts
  • Grapefruit also provides small amounts of B vitamins, zinc, copper and iron, which all work together in the body to promote immune system function. (healthline.com)
  • insulin
  • Eating grapefruit may help control insulin levels and thus have the ability to reduce your likelihood of becoming insulin resistant ( 19 ). (healthline.com)