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  • species
  • a genotype typically implies a measurement of how an individual differs or is specialized within a group of individuals or a species. (wikipedia.org)
  • The branchi, as in the genotype and other species, strongly asymmetrically developed. (dictionary.com)
  • As an example, let's consider a population of 100 four-o-'clock plants (Mirabilis jalapa) with the following genotypes: 49 red-flowered plants with the genotype AA 42 pink-flowered plants with genotype Aa 9 white-flowered plants with genotype aa When calculating an allele frequency for a diploid species, remember that homozygous individuals have two copies of an allele, whereas heterozygotes have only one. (wikipedia.org)
  • SNP genotyping is the measurement of genetic variations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between members of a species. (wikipedia.org)
  • But differing genotypes within a single species may also show differing reaction norms relative to a particular phenotypic trait and environment variable. (wikipedia.org)
  • SNPs
  • TaqMan-based genotyping is most appropriate for projects of medium size (100-1000 samples) being genotyped for a small number of SNPs (1-50). (utmb.edu)
  • The TaqMan service begins with a review of the list of SNPs to be genotyped as not all SNPs can be typed using the TaqMan technology. (utmb.edu)
  • As most commonly used within SNPedia, genotype refers to the pair of SNPs inherited at a given chromosomal position, one inherited from Dad, one inherited from Mom. (snpedia.com)
  • The increase of interest in SNPs has been reflected by the furious development of a diverse range of SNP genotyping methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because DASH genotyping is measuring a quantifiable change in Tm, it is capable of measuring all types of mutations, not just SNPs. (wikipedia.org)
  • evolutionary
  • The following year, I found out that Dr. D'Adamo had made his categories more specific: According to his new book, "Change Your Genetic Destiny," there are six genotypes, each with its own needs, its own evolutionary story, its own strengths and weaknesses. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In this study, researchers were able to suggest a speculative framework for the evolutionary history underlying current-day phenotypic variation in human skin pigmentation based on the similarities and differences they found in the genotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Genotype frequency and gene frequency are closely related variables, and both are easy to measure. (blackwellpublishing.com)
  • In the decades following the publications of his first paper on the "thrifty genotype" hypothesis, Neel researched the frequency of diabetes and (increasingly) obesity in a number of other populations and sought out observations that might disprove or discount his "thrifty gene" hypothesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenotypic
  • But the full complexity of the norm of reaction is a function, for each genotype, relating environmental factor to phenotypic trait. (wikipedia.org)
  • A widespread conception is that each genotype gives a certain range of possible phenotypic expressions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rather, by reducing the picture from two dimensions to just one, it focuses only on discrete, non-overlapping phenotypic expressions, and hides the more common pattern of local minima and maxima in phenotypic expression, with overlapping ranges of phenotypic expression between genotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • It can be demonstrated mathematically that sexual reproduction virtually guarantees that each individual will have a unique genotype (except for those individuals, such as identical twins, who are derived from the same fertilized egg). (britannica.com)
  • Individuals of the same genotype breed alike. (daylilies.org)
  • Genotype frequency in a population is the number of individuals with a given genotype divided by the total number of individuals in the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genotyping applies to a broad range of individuals, including microorganisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in modern societies with a constant abundance of food, this genotype efficiently prepares individuals for a famine that never comes. (wikipedia.org)
  • affects
  • All the genotypes and its subtypes affects the liver to the same extent of damage irrespective of the HCV genotype Among the common six genotypes, genotype 1 is the most prevalent form in the United States of America, covering around 70-90% of total infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genotype 4 and 5 affects a large proportion of the population in undeveloped countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • He went on to advance that the thrifty genotype concept be thought of in the context of a "compromised" genotype that affects several other metabolically-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • Traditionally genotyping is the use of DNA sequences to define biological populations by use of molecular tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the hypothesis, the 'thrifty' genotype would have been advantageous for hunter-gatherer populations, especially child-bearing women, because it would allow them to fatten more quickly during times of abundance. (wikipedia.org)
  • identical
  • During asexual reproduction, the genotype passed from the single parent cell to the two (usually) daughter cell s produced is identical. (everything2.com)
  • population
  • As the Finnish population is isolated and has recently undergone a population bottleneck, relative to other countries, it offers two main benefits for genotype-first studies. (wikipedia.org)