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  • SNPs
  • But despite these SNPs, human beings only differ from one another by about 0.1 percent, enough to ensure that no two human beings are genetically identical, even, sometimes, identical twins. (howstuffworks.com)
  • researchers
  • Some researchers are now looking at the 99 or so percent of DNA that aren't genes, wondering if these previously neglected chunks of the genome have significant roles to play. (howstuffworks.com)
  • A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. (the-scientist.com)
  • research
  • The HGP and subsequent research efforts have changed the consensus view of genes and noncoding DNA, casting them as part of an increasingly complex image of genes, DNA and other components of the genome. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Data
  • Empirical data and humans' biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale. (the-scientist.com)
  • gene
  • They shared a vision of the future in which knowledge of every gene that composes the human genome would be available to any scientist in the world at the click of a computer key. (caltech.edu)
  • Table 1 (above) summarizes the physical organization and gene content of the human reference genome, with links to the original analysis, as published in the Ensembl database at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), sometimes referred to as "HUGO", is one of HUGO's most active committees and aims to assign a unique gene name and symbol to each human gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific
  • The National Human Genome Research Institute today launched a new round of strategic planning that will establish a 2020 vision for genomics research aimed at accelerating scientific and medical breakthroughs. (genome.gov)
  • Koonin, who is Caltech's provost, was chair of the JASON study of 1997, which noted to the scientific community that quality standards could be relaxed so that a "rough draft" of the human genome could be made years earlier and still be of great utility. (caltech.edu)
  • The Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights is a document that was issued by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) at its 29th session in 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • The Human Genome Sequencing Center subsequently sequenced and annotated the genome of the cow (Bos taurus), the sea urchin, rhesus macaque, tammar wallaby, Dictyostelium discoideum, and a number of bacteria that cause serious infections (Rickettsia typhi, Enterococcus faecium, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Fusobacterium nucleatum). (wikipedia.org)
  • This made the fish, which is native to the Himalayan region, the first vertebrate to have its whole genome sequenced in India, as previously Indian scientists had only sequenced bacteria and plant genomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • Understanding the origin of the human genome is of particular interest to many researchers since the genome is indicative of the evolution of humans. (britannica.com)
  • By breaking the human genome into millions of pieces and reverse-engineering their arrangement, researchers have produced the highest-resolution picture ever of the genome's three-dimensional structure. (wired.com)
  • To determine genome structure without being able to directly see it, the researchers first soaked cell nuclei in formaldehyde, which interacts with DNA like glue. (wired.com)
  • vast
  • Many different studies have attempted to quantify the amount of adaptive evolution in the human genome, the vast majority using the comparative approaches outlined above. (wikipedia.org)
  • insights
  • Quantifying adaptive evolution in the human genome gives insights into our own evolutionary history and helps to resolve this neutralist-selectionist debate. (wikipedia.org)
  • fundamental
  • For example, red blood cells ( erythrocytes ), which live for only about 120 days, and skin cells, which on average live for only about 17 days, must be renewed to maintain the viability of the human body , and it is within the genome that the fundamental information for the renewal of these cells, and many other types of cells, is found. (britannica.com)
  • draft
  • A more complete draft was published in 2003, and genome "finishing" work continued for more than a decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • diversity
  • The HGDP-CEPH Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel is a resource of 1,063 cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 1,050 individuals in 52 world populations, banked at the Foundation Jean Dausset-CEPH in Paris. (wikipedia.org)
  • HGDP has been instrumental in assessing human diversity and in providing information about similarities and differences in human populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • These are only a few of the several different types of structural variants that have been known to exist in the human genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The declaration is perhaps best known for its statement against human cloning and abuse of human genome against human dignity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Belimumab (trade name Benlysta, previously known as LymphoStat-B) is a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits B-cell activating factor (BAFF), also known as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). (wikipedia.org)
  • institute
  • PASADENA- Two of the key inventions that made possible the monumental task of sequencing the human genome came from the California Institute of Technology. (caltech.edu)
  • It was funded with substantial contributions from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (wikipedia.org)
  • billion
  • We humans can do and understand remarkable things -- launch spaceships, build incredibly fast computers, create gorgeous works of art -- but our 3.2 billion pieces of DNA may be too much for our minds to fully comprehend in the end. (howstuffworks.com)
  • world
  • Knowing about the relationship between such populations makes it possible to infer the journey of humankind from the humans who left Africa and populated the world to the humans of today. (wikipedia.org)
  • selective
  • The other methods for detecting adaptive evolution use genome wide approaches, often to look for evidence of selective sweeps. (wikipedia.org)