• Many millions of dollars are being poured into projects like Encode, a massively ambitious effort to determine the role of every single piece of DNA in the human genome. (howstuffworks.com)
  • But despite these SNPs, human beings only differ from one another by about 0.1 percent, enough to ensure that no two human beings are genetically identical, even, sometimes, identical twins. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Given the massive amount of population-based data that will be generated over the next decades, we believe a coordinated global effort is needed to disseminate human genome epidemiologic information in order to keep up with the progress of the Human Genome Project and its accompanying gene discoveries. (cdc.gov)
  • Given the paucity of population-based epidemiologic data regarding the frequency, disease risks and environmental interactions for many newly discovered human gene variants, we are concerned that appropriate health policy on the use of genetic tests may not be possible. (cdc.gov)
  • These researchers are presently using genomic information to create an "onco-chip," which will give researchers convenient experimental access to a miniature array containing hundreds of BACs, each carrying a gene whose mutation can cause human cancer. (caltech.edu)
  • They shared a vision of the future in which knowledge of every gene that composes the human genome would be available to any scientist in the world at the click of a computer key. (caltech.edu)
  • Eva Nogales and Yuan He used cryo-electron microscopy to record how a complex of biomolecules is able to read the human genome one gene at a time. (lbl.gov)
  • We've provided a series of snapshots that shows how the genome is read one gene at a time," says biophysicist Eva Nogales who led this research. (lbl.gov)
  • Recent results suggest that most of the vast quantities of noncoding DNA within the genome have associated biochemical activities, including regulation of gene expression, organization of chromosome architecture, and signals controlling epigenetic inheritance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Table 1 (above) summarizes the physical organization and gene content of the human reference genome, with links to the original analysis, as published in the Ensembl database at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in September 2000, the company reported that it had found a way to treat large, painful sores that often plague elderly patients, using a protein spray called repifermin, made by a human gene called keratinocyte growth factor-2. (wikipedia.org)
  • NIEHS research uses state-of-the-art science and technology to investigate the interplay between environmental exposures, human biology, genetics, and common diseases to help prevent disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • Last Wednesday, at "Career Night" during the American Society of Human Genetics annual conference in Baltimore, I was stationed one table over from Robert Steiner, MD, from the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Wisconsin. (plos.org)
  • The fundamental process of life by which information in the genome of a living cell is used to generate biomolecules that carry out cellular activities is the so-called "central dogma of molecular biology. (lbl.gov)
  • There is a widely held expectation that genomic studies will lead to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, and to new insights in many fields of biology, including human evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Koonin, who is Caltech's provost, was chair of the JASON study of 1997, which noted to the scientific community that quality standards could be relaxed so that a "rough draft" of the human genome could be made years earlier and still be of great utility. (caltech.edu)
  • The realization that traits and certain diseases can be passed from parent to offspring stretches back at least to the ancient Greeks, well before any genome was actually decoded. (livescience.com)
  • With technological advances that enable inexpensive and expanded access to genomic information, the amount of and the potential applications for the information that is extracted from the human genome is extraordinary. (britannica.com)
  • Everyone on the planet -- except identical twins -- has a unique genome. (amnh.org)
  • But despite these SNPs, human beings only differ from one another by about 0.1 percent, enough to ensure that no two human beings are genetically identical, even, sometimes, identical twins. (howstuffworks.com)
  • For example, red blood cells ( erythrocytes ), which live for only about 120 days, and skin cells, which on average live for only about 17 days, must be renewed to maintain the viability of the human body , and it is within the genome that the fundamental information for the renewal of these cells, and many other types of cells, is found. (britannica.com)
  • In the course of human progress, it has been far easier to understand the things we make, rather than what makes us. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Scientists have already identified more than 1.4 million SNPS, or single nucleotide polymorphisms - variations in the three billion letters of the human genetic code. (wired.com)
  • The picture is one of mind-blowing fractal glory, and the technique could help scientists investigate how the very shape of the genome, and not just its DNA content, affects human development and disease. (wired.com)
  • Their goal is to figure out the order of all 'DNA letters' (bases) in our genome. (amnh.org)
  • By looking at different subsets of the genome of several people and comparing the results, scientists hope to identify specific DNA variations that cause propensity for a certain disease as well as its genetic basis. (wired.com)
  • Less than three years after finishing the working draft of the three billion letters that make up human DNA and two years earlier than expected, an international consortium of scientists said Monday the set of instructions on how humans develop and function is done. (wired.com)
  • Since the human genome is more than 3 billion 'letters' long, this is an insanely huge job! (amnh.org)
  • We humans can do and understand remarkable things -- launch spaceships, build incredibly fast computers, create gorgeous works of art -- but our 3.2 billion pieces of DNA may be too much for our minds to fully comprehend in the end. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The human genome is comprised of three billion chemical units represented by the letters A, C, T, and G -- a string that would stretch from Boston to London if written in letters of the size in this article. (nytimes.com)
  • Takes you to a page with a list of all regions above the significance threshold on the left, and a Genome Browser on the right. (ucsc.edu)
  • Knowledge of the human genome provides an understanding of the origin of the human species, the relationships between subpopulations of humans, and the health tendencies or disease risks of individual humans. (britannica.com)
  • From the similarities and differences observed, it is possible to track the origins of the human genome and to see evidence of how the human species has expanded and migrated to occupy the planet. (britannica.com)
  • As the genome data comes out, you want to analyze it as fast as you can, make the discoveries first and protect the intellectual property,'' said Martin D. Leach, director for bioinformatics at CuraGen, which uses genomics to develop drugs. (nytimes.com)
  • Of course their constituent DNA strings are clumped, too: If the genome could be laid out end-to-end, it'd be six feet long. (wired.com)
  • It is a short report on the newly invented tools and technologies used for the studies of human genome variations and epigenoics. (nature.com)
  • We view human genome epidemiology as the intersection between molecular epidemiology and genetic epidemiology. (cdc.gov)