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  • genes
  • Because all body cells contain the same genes but in specialised cells most of the genes are not active. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Scientists put stem cells under different conditions to activate certain genes. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • In theory, the oocyte's cytoplasm would reprogram the transferred nucleus by silencing all the somatic cell genes and activating the embryonic ones. (sciencemag.org)
  • Cloning of genes and cells to create many copies in the laboratory is a common procedure essential for biomedical research. (bio.org)
  • Researchers have developed methods of inserting genes to "turn back the clock" on cells that have already specialized, so that they can turn into anything again. (stylemagazine.com)
  • The next step was to find a way of combining genes from two parents, rather than simply cloning the cell. (ncse.com)
  • Cloning is commonly used to amplify DNA fragments containing whole genes, but it can also be used to amplify any DNA sequence such as promoters, non-coding sequences and randomly fragmented DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization classifies these disorders into a) Myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1 (i.e. high eosinophil blood counts caused by mutations in the eosinophil cell line of one of these three genes), 'b) Chronic eosinophilic leukemia, and c) the Idiopathic hypereosinophiic syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clonal hypereosinophilia is hypereosinophilia caused by a pre-malignant or malignant clone of eosinophils that bear mutations in genes for PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1 or, alternatively, a chromosome translocation that creates the PCM1-JAK2 fusion gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clone of eosinophils bear a mutation in any one of several genes that code for proteins that regulate cell growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • These fusion genes encode fusion proteins that continuously stimulate cell growth, proliferation, prolonged survival, and/or differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • That is, these plasmids could serve as cloning vectors to carry genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A potential use of stem cells genetically matched to a patient would be to create cell lines that have genes linked to a patient's particular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if a person with Parkinson's disease donated his or her somatic cells, the stem cells resulting from SCNT would have genes that contribute to Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem cell res
  • These stem cells would then be used for research and development of the sorts of medical therapies promised by proponents of stem cell research. (cnn.com)
  • Whatever answer comes from the courts, the ease with which the ban passed through the House and the early rhetoric coming from the Senate indicate that banning cloning may be one way to ease political tensions over stem cell research. (cnn.com)
  • In a horse trade of sorts, legislators seem willing to give up even therapeutic uses of cloning in order to inoculate themselves against charges that funding stem cell research will lead to unacceptable uses of human embryos. (cnn.com)
  • Outside experts had different views of the study, which was led by Young Gie Chung of the Research Institute for Stem Cell Research at CHA Health Systems in Los Angeles. (stabroeknews.com)
  • EDITOR'S NOTE: Two of the most hotly debated and currently controversial topics-in the fields of science, religion, ethics, and politics-are human cloning and stem-cell research. (apologeticspress.org)
  • The corporation came into being some three years after the establishing of the International Consortium of Stem Cell Research (INCOSC) in China (a vast research and development laboratory covering 250 acres). (hubpages.com)
  • The Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in the United States helped set up the Hinxton Group , a collaboration of British and American scientists determining the ethical and moral structures of stem cell research. (hubpages.com)
  • Boyalife's South Korean partner, Sooam, has set up in China in order to avoid Korea's bioethics laws which ban the use of human eggs in stem cell research. (hubpages.com)
  • Posts in this category pertain to abortion, human cloning, embryonic stem cell research, and other issues pertaining to the advancement of the culture of life and to the respect and protection of the sanctity of life. (chipbennett.net)
  • The measure specifically bans human cloning, but would permit all federally allowed stem cell research in the state. (chipbennett.net)
  • Somatic cell nuclear transplantation has become a focus of study in stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another application of SCNT stem cell research is using the patient specific stem cell lines to generate tissues or even organs for transplant into the specific patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only a handful of the labs in the world are currently using SCNT techniques in human stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • But tissues created from those stem cells would not genetically match a patient, meaning steps might be needed to prevent rejection. (nytimes.com)
  • Advocates support development of therapeutic cloning in order to generate tissues and whole organs to treat patients who otherwise cannot obtain transplants, to avoid the need for immunosuppressive drugs, and to stave off the effects of aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Opponents of cloning have concerns that technology is not yet developed enough to be safe, that it could be prone to abuse (leading to the generation of humans from whom organs and tissues would be harvested), and have concerns about how cloned individuals could integrate with families and with society at large. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advocates of human therapeutic cloning believe the practice could provide genetically identical cells for regenerative medicine, and tissues and organs for transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such cells, tissues, and organs would neither trigger an immune response nor require the use of immunosuppressive drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue engineering is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physicochemical factors to improve or replace biological tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells or progenitor cells to produce tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors, and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory from combinations of engineered extracellular matrices ("scaffolds"), cells, and biologically active molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maintenance of these levels results from a balance between production of eosinophils by bone marrow eosinophil precursor cells termed CFU-Eos and the emigration of circulating eosinophils out of the blood through post-capillary venules into tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clonal hypereosinophilia, also termed Primary hypereosinophelia or clonal eosinophilia, is a grouping of hematological disorder characterized by the development and growth of a pre-malignant or malignant population of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the bone marrow, blood, and/or other tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce cloned
  • The Conference of Catholic Bishops, for instance, said Wednesday that the research "will be taken up by those who want to produce cloned children as 'copies' of other people. (nytimes.com)
  • CEO, Xu Xiaochun, educated at Canadian and American universities, plans to produce cloned beef using genetically identical super-cattle to cater to the hugely successful Chinese middle class who enjoy the taste of Kobe beef. (hubpages.com)
  • gene
  • Molecular cloning is the production of many identical copies of a gene from a single gene inserted into a cloning vector. (rrnursingschool.biz)
  • A vector is any DNA molecule which is capable of multiplying inside the host to which our gene of interest is integrated for cloning. (prezi.com)
  • Using Recombinant DNA technology, we can isolate and clone single copy of a gene or a DNA segment into an indefinite number of copies, all identical. (prezi.com)
  • The DNA fragment containing the gene sequence to be cloned (also known as ('insert') is isolated. (prezi.com)
  • The order of bases in a gene tells the cell in what order to put the amino acids. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Colony-forming assays demonstrated the coexistence of 2 different haematopoietic clones: one was positive for the JAK2V617F mutation and the other co-expressed both JAK2V617F and the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Commonly a virus that has been altered to carry human DNA is used to deliver the healthy gene to the targeted cells of the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally, the term cloning is misleadingly used to refer to the identification of the chromosomal location of a gene associated with a particular phenotype of interest, such as in positional cloning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some researchers in this area, and "life extensionists", "immortalists" or "longevists" (those who wish to achieve longer lives themselves), believe that future breakthroughs in tissue rejuvenation, stem cells, regenerative medicine, molecular repair, gene therapy, pharmaceuticals, and organ replacement (such as with artificial organs or xenotransplantations) will eventually enable humans to have indefinite lifespans (agerasia) through complete rejuvenation to a healthy youthful condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene, the first cloned calf in the world was born in 1997 at the American Breeders Service facilities in Deforest, Wisconsin, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Introduction of a viral gene that partially deregulates the cell cycle (e.g., the adenovirus type 5 E1 gene was used to immortalize the HEK 293 cell line). (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • If successful, such techniques might allow for cells to be grown to create replacement organs, neural implants for patients with degenerative nervous disorders like Alzheimer's disease, or disease-fighting cells, all of which would be an exact genetic match for the patient being treated. (cnn.com)
  • These new combinations of genetic materials or Recombinant DNA '(rDNA)' molecules are introduced into host cells, where they propagate and multiply. (prezi.com)
  • An egg cell is taken and you remove its genetic material. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The researchers, at Oregon Health and Science University, took skin cells from a baby with a genetic disease and fused them with donated human eggs to create human embryos that were genetically identical to the 8-month-old. (nytimes.com)
  • But, in the Cell study, Shoukhrat Mitalipov and colleagues at Oregon Health & Science University began with skin cells from an 8-month-old baby that had a genetic disease. (stylemagazine.com)
  • Clone - 1) An exact genetic replica of a DNA molecule, cell, tissue, organ, or entire plant or animal. (chipbennett.net)
  • Eukaryotic cells contain functionally distinct subunits: a nucleus enclosing genetic information, plus various mitochondria and (for plants) chloroplasts. (ncse.com)
  • There is a crucial difference, however, because in the Eukarya the genetic information for each of the subunits as well as for the cell as a whole is combined in the nucleus. (ncse.com)
  • Our data support the hypothesis that a heterozygous JAK2V617F clone may have favoured the bi-clonal nature of this myeloproliferative disorder, generating clones harbouring a second transforming genetic event. (bioportfolio.com)
  • however, the genetic composition of the cells within a given tumour is only poorly explored. (uib.no)
  • For example, a female DNA donor would be the clone's genetic twin, rather than mother, complicating the genetic and social relationships between mother and child as well as the relationships between other family members and the clone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic cells have also been collected in the practice of cryoconservation of animal genetic resources as a means of conserving animal genetic material, including to clone livestock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development of biotechnology has allowed for the genetic manipulation of somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004, the first commercially cloned cat, Little Nicky, was created by Genetic Savings & Clone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Joshua Lederberg advocated cloning and genetic engineering in an article in The American Naturalist in 1966 and again, the following year, in The Washington Post. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no known genetic link for identical twinning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The offspring having all of the mother's genetic material are called full clones and those having only half are called half clones. (wikipedia.org)
  • copies
  • This policy would make illegal not only the kind of cloning conjured up by Frankensteinian futurists who predict the creation of troops of identical humans to perform dangerous or evil tasks, or in which rich and narcissistic people use cloning to create identical copies of themselves born 30, 40, or even 50 years after the original. (cnn.com)
  • 1.The cell has two copies of DNA that spread out in long strings. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • An example of this is the modern cultivated species of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., a hexaploid species whose somatic cells contain six copies of every chromatid. (wikipedia.org)
  • This single cell can then be expanded exponentially to generate a large amount of bacteria, each of which contain copies of the original recombinant molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular
  • Molecular cloning refers to the process of making multiple molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, a number of other features are needed, and a variety of specialised cloning vectors (small piece of DNA into which a foreign DNA fragment can be inserted) exist that allow protein production, affinity tagging, single stranded RNA or DNA production and a host of other molecular biology tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular cloning methods are central to many contemporary areas of modern biology and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strictly speaking, recombinant DNA refers to DNA molecules, while molecular cloning refers to the experimental methods used to assemble them. (wikipedia.org)
  • This changed dramatically with the advent of molecular cloning methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular cloning is similar to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that it permits the replication of DNA sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fundamental difference between the two methods is that molecular cloning involves replication of the DNA in a living microorganism, while PCR replicates DNA in an in vitro solution, free of living cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative
  • It is an incredibly powerful approach with potential to generate almost any tissue in the body, genetically identical to the patient," said Jeff Karp, associate professor at Harvard Medical School and co-director of the Center for Regenerative Therapeutics at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. (stylemagazine.com)
  • tissue
  • That raises the hope that one day the cells will be turned into replacement tissue or even replacement organs to treat a host of diseases. (nytimes.com)
  • Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are defined as the heterogeneous population of tissue-resident stem and progenitor cells that are capable of proliferating and differentiating into connective tiss. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The continued success of tissue engineering, and the eventual development of true human replacement parts, will grow from the convergence of engineering and basic research advances in tissue, matrix, growth factor, stem cell, and developmental biology, as well as materials science and bio informatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doris Taylor's heart in a jar Tissue-engineered airway Tissue-engineered vessels Artificial skin constructed from human skin cells embedded in a hydrogel, such as in the case of bioprinted constructs for battlefield burn repairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial bone marrow Artificial bone Laboratory-grown penis Oral mucosa tissue engineering Foreskin Tissue engineering utilizes living cells as engineering materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is generally used to refer to artificial human cloning, which is the reproduction of human cells and tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The alternative, performing an analysis on primary cells from multiple tissue donors, does not have this advantage. (wikipedia.org)
  • While immortalized cell lines often originate from a well-known tissue type, they have undergone significant mutations to become immortal. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, supposed thyroid lines were actually melanoma cells, supposed prostate tissue was actually bladder cancer, and supposed normal uterine cultures were actually breast cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • These agents serve to orchestrate robust immune and inflammatory responses that destroy invading microbes, foreign tissue, and malignant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Absent these causes, patients were diagnosed in the World Health Organization's classification as having either 1) Chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified, (CEL-NOS) if blood or bone marrow blast cells exceeded 2% or 5% of total nucleated cells, respectively, and other criteria were met or 2) idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) if there was evidence of eosinophil-induced tissue damage but no criteria indicating chronic eosinophilic leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, some sea anemones go through the process of pedal laceration in which a genetically identical individual is asexually produced from tissue broken off from the anemone's pedal disc. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • The frequency of spontaneous mutations is significantly lower in advanced male germ cells than in somatic cell types from the same individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • These findings appear to reflect employment of more effective mechanisms to limit the initial occurrence of spontaneous mutations in germ cells than in somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer occurs when a somatic cell which normally cannot divide undergoes mutations which cause de-regulation of the normal cell cycle controls leading to uncontrolled proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immortalised cell lines have undergone similar mutations allowing a cell type which would normally not be able to divide to be proliferated in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • The factory, however, will not be cloning people but cattle for the Chinese food market. (hubpages.com)
  • In cattle, when individual cells from 4- and 8-cell embryos and implanted in different foster mothers, they can develop normally into calves and this technique has been used routinely within cattle breeding schemes for over 10 years. (chipbennett.net)
  • A Boran cattle bull was cloned at the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015 the Chinese company BoyaLife announced that in partnership with the Korean company Sooam Biotech, they were planning to build a factory in Tianjin, China to produce 100,000 cloned cattle per year, starting in 2016 to supply China's growing market for quality beef. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • The giant clone replication factory in Tianjin, a harbour town in the north of China, will be ready to go into production within seven months - June 2016. (hubpages.com)
  • In January 2016 the scientist at the Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes in Hisar, India announced that they had cloned a buffalo offspring "Cirb Gaurav" using cells of the ventral side of the tail of superior buffalo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vectors
  • Phages such as λ also can be used as vectors for cloning DNA in bacterial systems. (prezi.com)
  • Modern cloning vectors include selectable antibiotic resistance markers, which allow only cells in which the vector has been transfected, to grow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the cloning vectors may contain colour selection markers, which provide blue/white screening (alpha-factor complementation) on X-gal medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • When the editors of Time screamed on the cover of their February 19, 2001 issue, "Human Cloning is Closer than You Think! (apologeticspress.org)
  • A purebred Hereford calf clone named Chloe was born in 2001 at Kansas State University's purebred research unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Millie and Emma were two female Jersey cows cloned at the University of Tennessee in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001, Brazil cloned their first heifer, Vitória. (wikipedia.org)
  • clonal
  • Interestingly, while clonal heterogeneity could be recapitulated in spheroid-based xenografts, we find that genetically distinct clones displayed different tumourigenic potential. (uib.no)
  • These data reveal the clonal heterogeneity of GBMs at the level of DNA content, tumourigenic potential and stem cell marker expression, which is likely to impact glioma progression and treatment response. (uib.no)
  • Another Nobel Laureate, James D. Watson, publicized the potential and the perils of cloning in his Atlantic Monthly essay, "Moving Toward the Clonal Man", in 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immortalized cell lines can also be cloned giving rise to a clonal population which can, in turn, be propagated indefinitely. (wikipedia.org)
  • In plants, clonal colonies are created through the propagation of genetically identical trees by stolons or rhizomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • 3. Virus cloning from a mixed population can be achieved by repeatedly picking a single plaque and so selecting a single replicating species. (rrnursingschool.biz)
  • Those species with a separation between sterile somatic cells and a germ line are called Weismannists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some cells divide asymmetrically by budding, for example Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast species used in baking and brewing. (wikipedia.org)
  • twins
  • This can occur naturally at the two cell stage to give identical twins. (chipbennett.net)
  • It does not refer to the natural conception and delivery of identical twins. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fraternal twins, each twin is fertilized by its own sperm cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women who have a family history of fraternal twins have a higher chance of producing fraternal twins themselves, as there is a genetically linked tendency to hyper-ovulate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vast majority of twins are either dizygotic (fraternal) or monozygotic (identical). (wikipedia.org)
  • Dizygotic (DZ) or fraternal twins (also referred to as "non-identical twins", "dissimilar twins", "biovular twins", and, informally in the case of females, "sororal twins") usually occur when two fertilized eggs are implanted in the uterus wall at the same time. (wikipedia.org)
  • When two eggs are independently fertilized by two different sperm cells, fraternal twins result. (wikipedia.org)
  • uterus
  • 2) "Clone or attempt to clone a human being" means to implant in a uterus or attempt to implant in a uterus anything other than the product of fertilization of an egg of a human female by a sperm of a human male for the purpose of initiating a pregnancy that could result in the creation of a human fetus, or the birth of a human being. (chipbennett.net)
  • somatic cells
  • There are approximately 220 types of somatic cells in the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in sponges, non-differentiated somatic cells form the germ line and, in Cnidaria, differentiated somatic cells are the source of the germline. (wikipedia.org)
  • As multicellularity evolved many times, sterile somatic cells did too. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evolution of an immortal germline producing specialized somatic cells involved the emergence of mortality, and can be viewed in its simplest version in volvocine algae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like all cells, somatic cells contain DNA arranged in chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Female germ cells also show a mutation frequency that is lower than that in corresponding somatic cells and similar to that in male germ cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone marrow
  • For instance people with blood diseases can be treated by bone marrow transplants as they contain stem cells that can turn into new blood cells to replace the bad ones. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • One bioethicist, Jacob M. Appel of New York University, has gone so far as to argue that "children cloned for therapeutic purposes" such as "to donate bone marrow to a sibling with leukemia" may someday be viewed as heroes. (wikipedia.org)
  • replication
  • cloning vector Any DNA molecule capable of autonomous replication within a host cell, into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. (rrnursingschool.biz)
  • Artificial expression of key proteins required for immortality, for example telomerase which prevents degradation of chromosome ends during DNA replication in eukaryotes Hybridoma technology, specifically used for the generation of immortalized antibody-producing B cell lines, where an antibody-producing B cell is fused with a myeloma (B cell cancer) cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples of the DNA sequences that are difficult to clone are inverted repeats, origins of replication, centromeres and telomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecule
  • Insertion of these DNA fragments into a host cell using a 'vector' (carrier DNA molecule). (prezi.com)
  • This process takes advantage of the fact that a single bacterial cell can be induced to take up and replicate a single recombinant DNA molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • livestock
  • Cloning can help livestock producers deliver what consumers want: nutritious, wholesome food products provided to them in a repeatable and reliable manner, and at an affordable price. (bio.org)
  • animals are currently cloned in laboratories and in livestock production. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • BIO supports the FDA scientific risk assessment which concludes that eating foods from animals which have been cloned for better health are safe for human consumption. (bio.org)
  • Difference between cloned and transgenic animals. (bio.org)
  • unit7 cloning animals - UNIT 7 Animal Cloning and. (coursehero.com)
  • The creation of one or more genetically identical animals by transferring the nucleus of a body cell into an egg from which the nucleus has been removed. (chipbennett.net)
  • Cloning of animals is opposed by animal-groups due to the number of cloned animals that suffer from malformations before they die, and while food from cloned animals has been approved by the US FDA, its use is opposed by some other groups concerned about food safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • This would negate the exploitation of animals in scientific research on cloning, cloning used in food production, or as other resources for human use or consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • recombinant
  • Here, we report that cells exposed to cell surface SE-positive HLA-DR (human leukocyte antigen-DR) molecules, to cell-free recombinant proteins genetically engineered to express the SE motif, or to SE-positive synthetic peptide showed diminished cAMP-dependent signaling, increased ROS levels, and higher vulnerability to oxidative DNA damage. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Using the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of hippocampal neuron ischemia in vitro, we found that the overexpression of miR-134 mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector infection significantly promoted neuron death induced by OGD/reoxygenation, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 provided protective effects against OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. (jove.com)
  • Important biologics include: Whole blood and other blood components Organs and tissue transplants Stem cell therapy Antibodies for passive immunization (e.g., to treat a virus infection) Human breast milk Fecal microbiota Human reproductive cells Some biologics that were previously extracted from animals, such as insulin, are now more commonly produced by recombinant DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dolly the S
  • Dolly the Sheep became famous for being the first successful case of the reproductive cloning of a mammal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blastocyst stage is developed by the egg which helps to create embryonic stem cells from inner cell mass of the blastocyst.The first animal that is developed by this technique is Dolly, the sheep in 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zhong Zhong (Chinese: 中中 pinyin: Zhōng Zhōng, born 27 November 2017) and Hua Hua (Chinese: 华华 pinyin: Huá Huá, born 5 December 2017) are identical crab-eating macaques (also referred to as cynomolgus monkeys) that were created through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the same cloning technique that produced Dolly the sheep in 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since scientists produced the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep in 1996 using the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique, 23 mammalian species have been successfully cloned, including cattle, cats, dogs, horses and rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • of TRPC decreased the cell routine S stage and cell migration, implicating an operating function for TRP-mediated Ca2+ entrance in cell proliferation and invasion. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Exogenous PUFA and a TRPC3 antagonist regularly attenuated breasts cancer tumor cell proliferation and migration, recommending a mechanism where PUFA restrains the breasts cancer partially via its inhibition of TRPC stations. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Ca2+ entrance via turned on TRPC was improved when PUFA had been absent, recommending a double-gating system for Danshensu TRPC which may be involved with MCF breasts cancer tumor cell proliferation and invasion. (cancercurehere.com)
  • The challenge in the above analysis is to note as we had in Cancer Dynamics that as the genetic profile of the cancer cells change, there is a survival of the fittest occurring, namely a certain cell tries to dominate, and there is also the issue of stem cells and stem cell control and proliferation. (blogspot.com)
  • Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), abundant components of the cell surface and the extracellular matrix, are critically involved in a variety of biological phenomena, including cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. (rupress.org)
  • Ectopic expression of the embryonic transcription factor, NANOG, is shown to reverse senescence and restore the proliferation and differentiation potential of senescent stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumour
  • Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. (blogspot.com)
  • A picture emerges of a diaspora of tumour cells, sharing a common heritage, spreading from one site to another, while retaining the genetic imprint of their ancestors. (blogspot.com)
  • Rather, a picture emerges of multiple related tumour clones competing for dominance across the entirety of the host. (blogspot.com)
  • Senescent cells affect tumour suppression, wound healing and possibly embryonic/placental development and a pathological role in age-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • Merogony results in merozoites, which are multiple daughter cells, that originate within the same cell membrane, sporogony results in sporozoites, and gametogony results in microgametes. (wikipedia.org)
  • vast
  • For example, the vast majority of commercially produced bananas are cloned from a single source, the Cavendish cultivar, and those plants are currently threatened worldwide by a newly discovered fungal disease to which they are highly susceptible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Homo
  • Intrigued, the Kree began to experiment on Earth's then-primitive Homo sapiens to produce the genetically advanced Inhuman race. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Outcomes had been gathered from 3 different batches of MCF-7 cells. (cancercurehere.com)
  • A different form of 3- O sulfated HS is involved in the entry of HSV-1 into host cells and the fusion of infected cells. (rupress.org)
  • The process of somatic cell nuclear transplant involves two different cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (/ɛmɑːrɛseɪ/ or /ˈmɜːrsə/) is a gram-positive bacterium that is genetically different from other strains of Staphylococcus aureus. (wikipedia.org)
  • diploid
  • Cellular senescence is the phenomenon by which normal diploid cells cease to divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • After approximately 30 hours from the time of fertilization, fusion of the pronuclei and immediate mitotic division produce two 2n diploid daughter cells called blastomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists
  • During the early 2000s, Indian scientists from the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad, proposed a plan to clone Asiatic cheetahs obtained from Iran. (wikipedia.org)
  • If not possible, Indian scientists requested Iran to allow them to collect some live cells of the cheetah pair in Iran itself, which can then be made into living cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • Matthew LaPlante and Paul Christiansen described efforts to understand what is killing the aspen groves of Utah, clones of genetically identical trees that exist as single interconnected organisms with unified root systems that can cover 100 acres or more. (kavlifoundation.org)
  • When such a binding occurs, it triggers the B lymphocyte to reproduce itself, forming a clone clone, group of organisms, all of which are descended from a single individual through asexual reproduction, as in a pure cell culture of bacteria. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • produce
  • We're studying this question using pea aphids, which produce genetically-identical winged or unwinged offspring based on how crowded they are on a host plant. (rochester.edu)
  • Her son, the Sage of the Six Paths, was born with the ability to produce chakra by combining physical energy (身体エネルギー, shintai enerugī), drawn from the trillions of cells that make up the human body, and mental energy (精神エネルギー, seishin enerugī), gained through experience and meditation. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • The experimental elimination of senescent cells from transgenic progeroid mice and non-progeroid, naturally-aged mice led to greater resistance against aging-associated diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • meiosis
  • This is because one of the three copies of each chromosome can't pair with another appropriate chromosome before separating into daughter cells, so these extra third copies end up randomly distributed between the two daughter cells from meiosis 1, resulting in the (usually) swiftly lethal aneuploidy condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • grown
  • Components and strategies Cell lifestyle MCF-7 cells had been grown up in DMEM moderate filled with 10% fetal leg serum and 1% penicillin/streptomycin serum as defined (9). (cancercurehere.com)
  • triggers
  • We have recently demonstrated that the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) shared epitope (SE) acts as a ligand that triggers nitric oxide (NO) signaling in opposite cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • process
  • Consistent with this, telomerase-immortalised cells continued to age (according to the epigenetic clock) without having been treated with any senescence inducers or DNA-damaging agents, re-affirming the independence of the process of epigenetic ageing from telomeres, cellular senescence, and the DNA damage response pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • It involves an unusual process in which two (endodyogeny) or more (endopolygeny) daughter cells are produced inside a mother cell, which is then consumed by the offspring prior to their separation. (wikipedia.org)