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  • scientists
  • Scientists believe (and are working hard) to use stem cells in the future to treat a wide range of diseases and injuries. (medindia.net)
  • Curing of diseased bladders is now possible with the help of unique cells from laboratory cultures of human stem cells as revealed by the scientists. (medindia.net)
  • It is intended to make the benefits of IVF more accessible to infertile women whilst addressing the shortage of high quality eggs for human stem cell research, thereby assisting scientists to progress in the global race to seek stem cell therapies for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. (ivf.net)
  • However, some scientists argue that this technique is too imperfect a science at this point - the success rate is significantly less than 0.5 per cent and so involves using a high, inefficient number of eggs. (ivf.net)
  • Scientists from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute (NYSCF) have succeeded in generating a new type of embryonic stem cell that carries a single copy of the human genome, instead of the two copies typically found in normal stem cells. (phys.org)
  • In this study, the scientists triggered unfertilized human egg cells into dividing. (phys.org)
  • The process allows scientists to use an adult cell (such as a skin cell) and an enucleated, unfertilized egg to create stem cells with the same DNA as the donor. (americanprogress.org)
  • These stem cells would also allow scientists to better study the progression of specific diseases and provide more efficient means of testing new drugs. (americanprogress.org)
  • The Harvard Stem Cell Institute, co-directed by Melton, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and David Scadden, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center of Regenerative Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is a unique collaborative effort that includes 99 principal investigators and hundreds of additional scientists in laboratories at Harvard University and at many of Harvard's affiliated hospitals. (scienceblog.com)
  • Scientists said when they used eggs from women under the age of 30, they could create on average one embryonic cell line for every 13 donations, compared with one for every 30 donations from women older than 30. (courant.com)
  • Bacteria, yeast, plants and animals (even mammals) are all examples of living things that scientists have been able to genetically alter. (prezi.com)
  • This potential to differentiate into any cell type of the body has encouraged scientists to pursue embryonic stem cell research for medical purposes. (icr.org)
  • To clone, scientists harvest an unfertilized egg from a female donor, removing the genetic material and replacing it with new DNA from an adult cell of the animal to be cloned. (wired.com)
  • pluripotent cell
  • Yet adults are more likely than infants to need regenerative therapy, the authors wrote, noting that "the incidence of many diseases that could be treated with pluripotent cell derivatives increases with age. (medindia.net)
  • At present, human pluripotent cell lines have been developed from two sources 1 with methods previously developed in work with animal models. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • tissues
  • Produce clones by vegetative propagation - production of structures in a plant from non-productive tissues which are able to grow into genetically identical offspring. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • So the term could be defined as, "The application of indigenous and/or scientific knowledge to the management of (parts of) microorganisms, or of cells and tissues of higher organisms, so that these supply goods and services of use to the food industry and its consumers. (bionity.com)
  • The hope has been that this would eliminate the problem of the patient's immune system attacking the pluripotent cells as foreign tissue, which is a problem with most organs and tissues when they are transplanted from one patient to another," added Schrepfer, who is a visiting scholar at Stanford's Cardiovascular Institute . (healthcanal.com)
  • Few subjects in biomedical science have captured the imagination of both the scientific community and the public as has the use of stem cells for the repair of damaged tissues. (jci.org)
  • The House of Lords recommended approving human embryonic stem cell research in 2002, the justification for which was to provide cells for replacing tissues in patients with organ failures. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The inner cell mass cells will go on to form virtually all of the tissues of the human body. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Although the inner cell mass cells can form virtually every type of cell found in the human body, they cannot form an organism because they are unable to give rise to the placenta and supporting tissues necessary for development in the human uterus. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • By definition, stem cells are capable of self-renewal and differentiating into many cell types to form tissues in humans and other organisms. (icr.org)
  • Dolly
  • The first cloned animal Dolly the sheep was created in 1996 using expensive and time-consuming cell surgery with a micromanipulator. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Dozens of animal clones - including cows, pigs, mice, goats and a cat - have been born since Dolly the sheep became the first new being created from an adult cell in 1997. (wired.com)
  • fertilization
  • The standard view of those who oppose HESC research is that a human being begins to exist with the emergence of the one-cell zygote at fertilization. (stanford.edu)
  • The first is from surplus fertilized eggs in fertility clinics donated by the parents undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • mitochondrial
  • The regulatory regimes of USA and EU based their false claim that the cloned animals are true clones on the baseless assumption that the mitochondrial genomes do not count when in fact the mitochondria play crucial roles in in a number of diseases of the nervous system, in cell suicide and in aging. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • bone marrow
  • We plan to take skin cells from a patient with a genetic disease, like sickle cell anemia or any one of more than 40 bone marrow disorders, and reprogram that skin cell back to its embryonic state. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Stem cells are undifferentiated dividing cells that are found in selective tissure such as bone marrow. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • and adult stem cells, found in adults, the best known of which, until recently, are certain cells from the bone marrow that can develop into all types of blood cells. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Bone marrow cells, in particular, were found to give rise to many cells besides those in the blood: in the skin, lung epithelium, kidney epithelium liver parenchyma, pancreas, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, endothelium, nerve cells in the cortex and cerebellum. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Blood stem cells reside in the bone marrow of every child and adult, and in fact, they can be found in very small numbers circulating in the blood stream. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • The haemopoietic stem cells found in bone marrow provide a good example of adult stem cell function. (icr.org)
  • 4 Additional adult stem cells found in bone marrow, the mesenchymal cells, differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat cells. (icr.org)
  • Adult stem cells from bone marrow are used to treat more than 70 diseases including leukemia and breast cancer. (icr.org)
  • 6 In addition to these treatments, bone marrow transplants have been shown to supply stem cells that regenerate cells in the liver. (icr.org)
  • 8 Clinical trials with neural stem cells to treat a neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 9 and bone marrow stem cells to replace damaged heart tissue from the effects of myocardial ischaemia (decreased blood flow to the heart associated with heart attack) 10 have also demonstrated the potential of adult stem cell treatments. (icr.org)
  • regenerate
  • These cells in theory won't be rejected by the patients' immune systems and can regenerate many different tissue types, such as nerves in damaged spinal cords, insulin-producing cells destroyed by diabetes, or neurons ravaged by diseases such as Parkinson's. (courant.com)
  • create
  • This involved fusing together human and mouse cells to create unstable cells which quickly lost most of the human chromosomes until only a few remained. (powerofthegene.com)
  • To create new cell lines, it is necessary to destroy preimplantation blastocysts. (jci.org)
  • The material is used to create a genetically identical animal, plant or human. (writesmyessays.com)
  • In both cases, the egg is allowed to develop into a hollow ball with inner cell mass , the future embryo, which is harvested and destroyed to create hES cell lines. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The goal of this type of process is not to create cloned human beings, but to harvest stem cells that can be used to study human development and to treat disease. (writework.com)
  • The technology, described in Cell1 on 24 January, could also be combined with gene-editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 to create genetically engineered primate-brain models of human disorders, including Parkinson's disease. (biologixgroup.com)
  • world's
  • The birds are likely the world's first transgenic or genetically engineered pigeons - and Mr Novak hopes they'll help him bring an extinct bird back from the dead. (abc.net.au)
  • biology
  • Biotechnology combines disciplines like genetics , molecular biology , biochemistry , embryology and cell biology , which are in turn linked to practical disciplines like chemical engineering, information technology, and robotics. (bionity.com)
  • Weissman is the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and the director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine . (healthcanal.com)
  • This work is an outstanding example of how collaborations between different institutions, on different continents, can solve fundamental problems in biomedicine," said Dieter Egli, PhD, principal co-author of the study, and Assistant Professor of Developmental Cell Biology in Pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center and a Senior Research Fellow at the NYSCF Research Institute and a NYSCF-Robertson Investigator. (phys.org)
  • The study of pluripotent stem cells has generated much interest in both biology and medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While gene regulatory networks that enhance our knowledge of pluripotency will help our understanding of stem cell biology, there are additional implications. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To engage in this debate, it is important to have an overview of stem cell biology. (jci.org)
  • differentiation
  • Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells, Nature (2016). (phys.org)
  • One challenge in their usage for such therapies is understanding the mechanisms that allow the maintenance of pluripotency and controlling the specific differentiation into required functional target cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus, differentiation of ESCs recapitulates the earliest stages of human development, and understanding the gene regulatory networks in these cells will enhance our knowledge of the regulation of the earliest stages of development. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The main goal of HESC research is to identify the mechanisms that govern cell differentiation and to turn HESCs into specific cell types that can be used for treating debilitating and life-threatening diseases and injuries. (stanford.edu)
  • Research is needed to determine the most viable stem cell lines and reliable ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types (neurons, muscle cells, etc. (jci.org)
  • cows
  • In 1994, Neal First of the University of Wisconsin in Madison cloned cows using the cells of a developing embryo. (dhushara.com)
  • The new process could also speed the development of genetically engineered cows-for example, those that produce pharmaceuticals in their milk. (dhushara.com)
  • Those eggs are then shipped to the Franklin, Texas, ranch where they are 'implanted in just regular, ordinary cows,' Dr Robl said. (dhushara.com)
  • lines
  • The new cell lines came from DNA of male and female patients as young as 2 and as old as 56. (courant.com)
  • Many in the international scientific community believe that the promise of stem cell-based studies or therapies will be realized only if we can derive new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines. (jci.org)
  • The centre contains just two stem cell lines developed by research teams at King s College London and the Centre for Life in Newcastle. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Recent published reports on the isolation and successful culturing of the first human pluripotent stem cell lines have generated great excitement and have brought biomedical research to the edge of a new frontier. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • The development of these human pluripotent stem cell lines deserves close scientific examination, evaluation of the promise for new therapies, and prevention strategies, and open discussion of the ethical issues. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • York Stem Cell Foundation
  • The research, supported by The New York Stem Cell Foundation, the New York State Stem Cell Science Program, and by the Azrieli Foundation, underscores the importance of private philanthropy in advancing cutting-edge science. (phys.org)
  • Stem Cell Institute
  • The globally unprecedented 'egg-sharing' scheme is being run by the North-East England Stem Cell Institute (Nesci) in Newcastle, and was approved by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority in July 2006. (ivf.net)
  • plants
  • Tissue culture - separation and subsequent growth of meristematic cells from tissue in vitro using nutritent mediums (used to clone plants that don't readily produce, that are endangered or rare, and to grow whole plants from genetically engineered plants). (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Microprogation - form of large scale tissue culture, where cells are taken from developing cloned plants or subcultures plants with a fresh culture medium (e.g. used to produce fields full of crops that are pest resistant. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Genetically Modified bacteria and plants could possibly be used to turn toxic compounds into nontoxic products. (prezi.com)
  • Some plants have been genetically engineered to be resistant to pesticides. (prezi.com)