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  • allow
  • Although rickettsiae are maintained in nature through arthropod vectors, they frequently infect vertebrates, which in turn allow new lines of vectors to acquire infection from the rickettsemic hosts. (cdc.gov)
  • efficient
  • Their intimate relationships with vector hosts ( Table 1 ) are characterized by efficient multiplication, long-term maintenance, transstadial and transovarial transmission, and extensive geographic and ecologic distribution. (cdc.gov)
  • encoding a gene
  • The present invention provides a method of inducing an immune response in a non-invasive mode, comprising the step of: contacting skin of an individual in need of such treatment topically by applying to said skin an immunologically effective concentration of a genetic vector encoding a gene of interest. (google.com)
  • Also provided is a method of inducing an anti-tumor immune response in an animal in need of such treatment, comprising the step of: contacting skin of said animal topically by applying to said skin an immunologically effective concentration of a vector encoding a gene which encodes an antigen which induces an anti-tumor effect in said animal following administration. (google.com)
  • gene therapy
  • In the future, gene therapy may provide a way to cure genetic disorders, such as severe combined immunodeficiency, cystic fibrosis or even haemophilia A. Because these diseases result from mutations in the DNA sequence for specific genes, gene therapy trials have used viruses to deliver unmutated copies of these genes to the cells of the patient's body. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one of the early gene therapy trials in 1999 this led to the death of Jesse Gelsinger, who was treated using an adenoviral vector. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • line biology genetic embryo cells division vector illustration. (vectorstock.com)
  • Target cells such as the patient's liver or lung cells are infected with the viral vector. (scribd.com)
  • But Daley sees a future where genetic diseases can be cured by creating iPS cells from a child's own diseased cells, rendering them disease-free through genetic intervention, then growing them into healthy tissue that won't be rejected by the patient's immune system. (childrenshospital.org)
  • In contrast, mutated cells from yet another fatal genetic blood disease, Fanconi anemia, resisted reprogramming efforts. (childrenshospital.org)
  • To realize the vision of future cures for bone-marrow disorders and other genetic diseases, many more challenges need to be overcome: the genetic and epigenetic instability of cells grown in lab dishes, inefficient genetic repair, directing differentiation of the pluripotent cells and getting the repaired cells and tissues to engraft in patients. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Embryonic stem cells with the modification of interest are then implanted into a viable blastocyst, which will grow into a mature chimeric mouse with some cells having the original blastocyst cell genetic information and other cells having the modifications introduced to the embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skepticism arises based on the assumption that evolutionary chaos could arise if sperm cells could act as vectors for exogenous DNA.4 Reasonable assumption tells us that because reproductive tracts contain free DNA molecules, sperm cells should be highly resistant to the risk of picking up exogenous DNA molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • the inhibitory factor in seminal fluid that prevents binding to foreign DNA molecules and a sperm endogenous nuclease activity that is triggered upon interaction of sperm cells with foreign DNA molecules.4 These protections give reason to believe that unintentional interactions between sperm and exogenous genetic sequences is kept to a minimal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells can then be isolated easily as those that have not taken up the viral vector genes do not have antibiotic resistance and so cannot grow in a culture with antibiotics present. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial
  • Researchers are experimenting introducing a 47th (artificial human) alongside the standard 46 .Carrying substantial amounts of genetic code. (scribd.com)
  • refers
  • Pharming, a portmanteau of "farming" and "pharmaceutical", refers to the use of genetic engineering to insert genes that code for useful pharmaceuticals into host animals or plants that would otherwise not express those genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • tools
  • Related to his genomics work, Rubin's lab is notable for development of genetic and genomics tools and studies of signal transduction and gene regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • code
  • It is also postulated that HGT promotes the maintenance of a universal life biochemistry and, subsequently, the universality of the genetic code. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other words, HGT is the "power" that "watches over" the universality of the genetic code and forces it into a "lingua franca" of life on Earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • Whether you're a global ad agency or a freelance graphic designer, we have the vector graphics to make your project come to life. (vectorstock.com)
  • feature
  • Combined with wavelet packet decomposition and isometric mapping (Isomap), the sensitive feature vectors are obtained and stored in database. (hindawi.com)
  • play
  • In Oxytricha, which has a unique genetic system, these elements play a critical role in development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similar
  • In this way, they are similar to using the lambda phage as a vector, except all the lambda genes have been deleted with the exception of the cos sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • insert
  • Knockin technology is different from knockout technology in that knockout technology aims to either delete part of the DNA sequence or insert irrelevant DNA sequence information to disrupt the expression of a specific genetic locus. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Gene knockin technology, on the other hand, alters the genetic locus of interest via a one-for-one substitution of DNA sequence information or by the addition of sequence information that is not found on said genetic locus. (wikipedia.org)
  • insect
  • The Camelpox virus is spread in three ways: direct contact, indirect contact, and insect vectors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insect activity, especially of the bean leaf beetle or other known vectors, can increase the chance of BPMV presence. (wikipedia.org)
  • University of Minnesota Extension, 2016) Disease Cycle and Pathogenesis BPMV can be transferred via insect vector such as the bean leaf beetle or from infected seed which is a low occurrence (Michigan State University Field Crop Pathology), although it is still not fully understood how the virus gets from one host from another host, if not bean leaf beetles. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • Genetic combinatorial marking using lentiviral vectors encoding fluorescent proteins (FPs) enabled cell fate mapping through advanced microscopy imaging. (jove.com)
  • Phage display is a laboratory technique for the study of protein-protein, protein-peptide, and protein-DNA interactions that uses bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to connect proteins with the genetic information that encodes them. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • The viral genetic material is contained in double stranded linear DNA consisting of 202,182 tightly packed base pairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eventually, the viral core dissolves, and the genetic material is bare within the cytoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the recent years viral vectors have been developed and implemented as anterograde tracers to identify the target regions of projecting neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • see also Viral neuronal tracing) In order to trace projections from a specific region or cell, a genetic construct, virus or protein can be locally injected, after which it is allowed to be transported anterogradely. (wikipedia.org)
  • SINEs can be transferred between individuals or species via horizontal transfer though a viral vector. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bean pod mottle virus Table of Contents Description and Importance Symptoms Disease Cycle and Pathogenesis Agronomic Impact Management Strategies Genetic Resistance Cultural Tactics Chemical Tactics Description and Importance BPMV is the viral pathogen that causes the disease Bean Pod Mottle in soybeans and other legumes such as snap peas. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Analyzing an individual's DNA can allow scientists to predict genetic disorders, as used in preventative genetics or gene therapy, and prove that person's identity, as used in the criminal justice system. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • If a "phagemid" vector is used (a simplified display construct vector) phage particles will not be released from the E. coli cells until they are infected with helper phage, which enables packaging of the phage DNA and assembly of the mature virions with the relevant protein fragment as part of their outer coat on either the minor (pIII) or major (pVIII) coat protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the North Central Region, the bean leaf beetle (Cerotoma trifurcate) is the most influential vector, by feeding on infected legumes and transferring virus particles to the next plant it lands on to feed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Replication
  • The basic scheme for this can be summarized as follows: Vector + DNA Fragment ↓ Recombinant DNA ↓ Replication of recombinant DNA within host cell ↓ Isolation, sequencing, and manipulation of purified DNA fragment There are numerous experimental variations to this scheme, but these steps are essential to DNA cloning in a laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minimal plasmids such as PFF1 are useful for studying the basic mechanisms of plasmid replication and copy number regulation, as there are less superfluous genetic elements which might affect the processes being studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expression
  • March 1982, pp. 1935-1939 J M Blatny, T Brautaset, C H Winther-Larsen, K Haugan and S Valla: "Construction and use of a versatile set of broad-host-range cloning and expression vectors based on the RK2 replicon", Appl. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • They consume many different kinds of fungi, including those involved in symbiotic mycorrhizal associations with trees, and are an important vector for dispersal of the spores of subterranean sporocarps (truffles) which have co-evolved with these and other mycophagous mammals and thus lost the ability to disperse their spores through the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • In functional analysis, an important class of vector spaces consists of the complete normed vector spaces over the real or complex numbers, which are called Banach spaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • available
  • Genetic Resistance Partial resistance to BPMV is available in some soybean varieties meaning there is less yield reductions, lower rates of green stem and seed mottling. (wikipedia.org)
  • multiple
  • The key of our method is the systematic purification of several tagged components of the protein complex in multiple genetic deletion strains, which serve to compromise the integrity of the complex. (embopress.org)
  • elements
  • The transposition and recombination of SINEs and other active nuclear elements is thought to be one of the major contributions of genetic diversity between lineages during speciation. (wikipedia.org)
  • tool
  • In the 1980s, HMMs were emerging as a useful tool in the analysis of biological systems and information, and in particular genetic information. (wikipedia.org)
  • The RK2 Plasmid is a broad-host-range plasmid belonging to the incP incompatibility group It is notable for its ability to replicate in a wide variety of single-celled organisms, which makes it suitable as a genetic engineering tool. (wikipedia.org)
  • analysis
  • Genetic polymorphisms of ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) as a covariate influencing daptomycin pharmacokinetics: a population analysis in patients with bone and joint infection. (nih.gov)
  • In mathematics, Functional analysis is concerned with the study of vector spaces and operators acting upon them. (wikipedia.org)