• The increasing evidence that addiction to alcohol has a genetic contribution from studies of families has given rise to research to improve our biological understanding of addiction and thereby our ability to more effectively treat those afflicted and possibly prevent addictive disorders. (jhu.edu)
  • Given their extensive documentation of lineages connecting many thousands of living individuals to a single common ancestor, their relatively larger extended family size (attributable in part to the early Mormon practice of plural marriage), relatively larger immediate family size, religious emphasis on "clean" or healthy living, and relative longevity, the genealogical data maintained by many Mormon ancestral family organizations have also been instrumental in medical research of genetic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biopsychiatric research has produced reproducible abnormalities of brain structure and function, and a strong genetic component for a number of psychiatric disorders (although the latter has never been shown to be causative, merely correlative). (wikipedia.org)
  • Still, by their own admission, this research has not progressed to the stage that they can identify clear biomarkers of these disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has shown that serious neurobiological disorders such as schizophrenia reveal reproducible abnormalities of brain structure (such as ventricular enlargement) and function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compelling evidence exists that disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism to name a few have a strong genetic component. (wikipedia.org)
  • Still, brain science has not advanced to the point where scientists or clinicians can point to readily discernible pathologic lesions or genetic abnormalities that in and of themselves serve as reliable or predictive biomarkers of a given mental disorder or mental disorders as a group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research already has elucidated some of the mechanisms of action of medications that are effective for depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, attention deficit, and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, it gives HRSA the power to establish, maintain, and operate a system designed to evaluate and manage treatments concerning congenital, genetic, and metabolic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Explain to interested patients that while the public continues to express support for genetic research, certain areas -- including embryonic stem cell research and cloning -- are not as publicly appealing. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Although genetic research in general has won increasing public support, one specialty -- stem cell research -- has lost favor since last year's survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Public support for non-embryonic stem cell research fell significantly from 75% in 2007 to 70% this year, according to the survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It is possible that opinion was a little more supportive in 2007 because the news was so fresh that non-embryonic stem cell research was a more realistic possibility," she added, referring to a November 2007 announcement that human skin cells could be used instead of embryos. (medpagetoday.com)
  • For embryonic stem cell research, 57% of adults are in favor, while 36% oppose it. (medpagetoday.com)
  • There is far less agreement on the question of stem cell research. (people-press.org)
  • Half of those who have been paying at least some attention to the issue favor government funding for stem cell research, but a substantial minority (35%) are opposed. (people-press.org)
  • By a narrower margin (47%-39%), those who have been paying attention say conducting stem cell research is more important than not destroying the potential life of embryos involved in such research. (people-press.org)
  • The nationwide survey of 2,002 adults by the Pew Research Center and the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life finds that support for federal funding of stem cell research has eroded somewhat since last August. (people-press.org)
  • Nearly half (46%) of those who believe it is more important to conduct stem cell research, despite its potential for destroying embryos, say they could imagine changing their minds on this issue. (people-press.org)
  • Fewer than a quarter (23%) say they could see themselves changing their minds and taking the view that medical cures arising from stem cell research are more important than the potential life of human embryos. (people-press.org)
  • Religious commitment is the most important factor influencing attitudes of opponents of stem cell research. (people-press.org)
  • In contrast to the divisions over stem cell research, more than seven-in-ten in every religious group oppose experimentation into human cloning. (people-press.org)
  • People with high levels of religious commitment are less supportive of federal funding for stem cell research than are those with weaker religious commitment. (people-press.org)
  • Aside from religion, political conservatives and those with the least formal education are most likely to oppose stem cell research. (people-press.org)
  • Nearly two-thirds of college graduates think the government should fund stem cell research, while just a quarter disagree. (people-press.org)
  • But among people who did not complete high school, just 35% favor government funding for stem cell research, while 46% are opposed. (people-press.org)
  • And while 69% of liberals favor government funding for stem cell research, just 38% of political conservatives agree. (people-press.org)
  • By contrast, 37% of those who think the government should not fund stem cell research cite religious beliefs as their biggest influence. (people-press.org)
  • This is particularly the case among white evangelical Protestants, fully 55% of whom explain their opposition to stem cell research in terms of their religious beliefs. (people-press.org)
  • Though almost evenly divided overall, there is a significant disparity in how firmly Americans favor or oppose stem cell research. (people-press.org)
  • He is a Health Senior Scholar at the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research and has worked on a variety of advisory committees involved in medical and scientific ethics, including one with the International Society for Stem Cell Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2014) validated that the phenotype resulting from a PRRS ELISA test, known as the sample to positive ratio (S/P), was under significant genetic control. (thepigsite.com)
  • High genetic concordance found in twin studies suggest a significant genetic influence on reading ability, although the degree depends on the definition of dyslexia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this view, analysis of Ashkenazi Jews together with a large sample from the region of the Khazar Khaganate would corroborate earlier results that Ashkenazi Jews derive their ancestry primarily from populations of the Middle East and Europe, that they possess considerable shared ancestry with other Jewish populations, and that there is no indication of a significant genetic contribution either from within or from north of the Caucasus region. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic science, genetic technologies, genetically based diseases, animal and human cloning, and genetically modified organisms are regular visitors to the news and entertainment culture. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Frederick said, however, that other diseases, like cancer and diabetes, seem to be far more complicated, involving both genetic coding and environmental factors that have yet to be sorted out. (newstimes.com)
  • CANADA - Investment in swine health research and specifically in the genetics of swine diseases has increased substantially in the last several years, writes Bob Kemp, PhD PAg, Vice President Genetic Programs and R&D, Genesus Inc. (thepigsite.com)
  • In the past 20 years, the number of laboratories carrying out genetic testing has risen from 110 to 605, whereas the number of diseases for which testing is available has risen from 111 to 2929. (els.net)
  • Because degenerative processes in worms and humans are similar, the research results offer clues for the prevention and medication of geriatric diseases. (phys.org)
  • In addition, advances in genetics and the development of large databases and biobanks to study associations between genetic or genomic variation and diseases have made the protection of privacy and confidentiality of genetic data far more difficult. (jhu.edu)
  • Several study designs, including twin, family, and adoption studies, are used to determine whether relatively common diseases, such as alcohol dependence, are caused at least in part by genetic factors and to estimate the magnitude of the overall genetic contribution. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • However, the large and increasing contributions from aquaculture to world fish supply and the problems of effectively managing capture fisheries stocks that are not well characterized genetically have not yet been recognized in terms of increased investment in fish genetic resources management policies," cautions FAO. (fao.org)
  • Schatten said, "Medical research needs to have healthy, genetically identical animals so cures can be perfected before they are tested on humans. (californiahealthline.org)
  • Our work is being carried out in collaboration with Dr Russell McLaughlin (Complex Trait Genomics, Trinity College), Professor Dan Bradley (Population Genetics, Trinity College) and the many research groups involved in the Project MinE Consortium (led by Professors Leonard van den Berg and Jan Veldink at UMC Utrecht). (tcd.ie)
  • Alongside experimental work, mathematicians developed the statistical framework of population genetics, bringing genetic explanations into the study of evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic studies on Jews are part of the population genetics discipline and are used to better understand the chronology of migration provided by research in other fields, such as history, archaeology, linguistics, and paleontology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indigenous peoples have raised concerns, including a lack of benefit to their communities, a diversion of attention and resources from non-genetic causes of health disparities and racism in health care, a reinforcement of "victim-blaming" approaches to health inequalities, and possible misuse of blood and tissue samples. (springer.com)
  • We consider how the different levels of Indigenous research governance operating in Australia impacted on the research project and discuss whether specific guidelines for the conduct of genetic research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are warranted. (springer.com)
  • In May 2006, some indigenous representatives went to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) to contest participation in genetic testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • A spokesman said, "The Genographic Project is exploitative and unethical because it will use Indigenous peoples as subjects of scientific curiosity in research that provides no benefit to Indigenous peoples, yet subjects them to significant risks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Concerns were that the knowledge gleaned from the research could clash with long-held beliefs of indigenous peoples and threaten their cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • I find it striking that even with some debate over the role of genetic testing and genetic research in society, a majority see the benefits of genetic research as outweighing the risks and that support has not dropped significantly since 2001," said the Carolyn Funk, Ph.D., who directed the eighth annual survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Borry P, Stultiens L, Nys H, Cassiman JJ and Dierickx K (2006) Presymptomatic and predictive genetic testing in minors: a systematic review of guidelines and position papers. (els.net)
  • Pharmacogenetic testing for responses to treatments may have more clinical utility, although additional research is required to demonstrate utility and cost-effectiveness. (jhu.edu)
  • Together, Seattle Children's Hospital, Research Institute and Foundation deliver superior patient care, identify new discoveries and treatments through pediatric research, and raise funds to create better futures for patients. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • The Institute is grouped into four main research units focused on the prevention and treatment of childhood cancer and include understanding childhood cancer, improving diagnosis, finding better treatments, and improving life after cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • But allowing environmental factors into the genetic mix gives rise to other reasons for our individuality, not just the .01 difference in genetic makeup. (newstimes.com)
  • The mission of the institute "is to understand biological processes which alter the genetic makeup of different organisms, as a basis for potential gene therapy and genome engineering techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic predisposition could account for a sizable proportion of interindividual variation. (hindawi.com)
  • Dr. Labuda and his colleagues were the first to identify a genetic variation in non-Africans that was likely to have come from an archaic population. (phys.org)
  • They partitioned co-variation amongst relatives into genetic and environmental elements, anticipating the later work of Fisher and Wright, including the effect of dominance on similarity of relatives, and beginning the first classic-twin studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • More research is needed to determine the impact of genetic explanations on addicted individuals, treatment-seeking behavior, and on public attitudes towards addicted persons. (jhu.edu)
  • The power of twin designs arises from the fact that twins may be either monozygotic (identical (MZ): developing from a single fertilized egg and therefore sharing all of their alleles) - or dizygotic (DZ: developing from two fertilized eggs and therefore sharing on average 50% of their polymorphic alleles, the same level of genetic similarity as found in non-twin siblings). (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though a minority of Americans consider themselves knowledgeable about the differences between types of [genetic testing and research], genetics is touching the lives of a substantial number of Americans," she said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • 2011) Age differences in genetic knowledge, health literacy and causal beliefs for health conditions. (els.net)
  • d'Agincourt‐Canning L (2001) Experiences of genetic risk: disclosure and the gendering of responsibility. (els.net)
  • But information about aquatic genetic resources is spotty, the application of genetics in capture fisheries and aquaculture has so far been limited, and adequate mechanisms for conserving the genetic diversity of farmed fish and their wild relatives are poorly developed, according to FAO. (fao.org)
  • We know that aquatic environments are changing due to climate change, movement of alien species, human development and other factors, and that species will need to adapt to survive -- genetic diversity will help with the adaptation. (fao.org)
  • In many cases, impacts on native aquatic diversity from fish that have accidentally escaped from farms, or from fish that are intentionally stocked into the wild, can not be determined because information on the genetic resources of both wild and farmed fish is simply not known. (fao.org)
  • Over the past decade or so, tremendous progress has been made through research into the genetics of various forms of hearing impairment, including ARHI and our knowledge of the complex mechanisms of auditory function has increased substantially. (hindawi.com)
  • In the following years, chemists developed techniques for sequencing both nucleic acids and proteins, while others worked out the relationship between the two forms of biological molecules: the genetic code. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is this sequence that forms a genetic code that is unique for every individual and determines genetic characteristics such as eye and hair colour. (sciencephoto.com)
  • As one of the nation's top five pediatric research centers, Seattle Children's Research Institute is internationally recognized for its work in neurosciences, immunology, cancer, infectious disease, injury prevention and much more. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • The current battle is joined over pending legislation to extend those guidelines in modified form to cover privately funded research as well. (washingtonpost.com)
  • 2007. CIHR guidelines for health research involving Aboriginal people. (springer.com)
  • ASHG's mission is to advance human genetics in science, health, and society through excellence in research, education, and advocacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of genetic tests is increasing much faster than the number of testing laboratories. (els.net)
  • The foundation evolved into Children's Cancer Institute, which opened its own research laboratories in 1984. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, the bioinformatics tools of BLAST, ORFinder, ClustalW and Cn3D are used to analyze genetic sequences. (nwabr.org)
  • This three-year award provided funding for education outreach programs and curriculum development that help secondary school teachers and their students learn about how information technology is used in biological research. (nwabr.org)
  • The worm is often used in fundamental biological research. (phys.org)
  • Such outreach for public participation in research has been encouraged by organizations such as International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), which is seeking to promote benefits from scientific research. (wikipedia.org)
  • For amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common form of MND, it has been established that genetic risk factors play an important role in an individual's risk to develop the disease. (tcd.ie)
  • Genetic research: who is at risk for alcoholism? (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Here, we give an overview of recent investigations aimed at identifying the genetic risk factors involved in ARHI and of what we currently know about its pathophysiology. (hindawi.com)
  • And they say the risk of being identified from genetic information will only increase. (wmra.org)
  • NPR's Veronique LaCapra reports that with more and more personal information available online, the risk of being identified from our genetic information will only increase. (wmra.org)
  • Genetic testing allows physicians to identify individual patients' risk of curve progression with a surrogate outcome, meaning risk of progression can be known without patients being subjected to frequent office visits and exposure to radiation from multiple radiographs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The public's continued support for genetic testing and research was expressed by a majority of adults (54%) who said its benefits outweigh any risks, according to Virginia Commonwealth University's annual life sciences survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Americans are also skeptical about the role government plays in addressing risks associated with genetic research. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Fifty-three percent of those surveyed felt government regulations will not protect them against "any risks linked to modern genetic science. (medpagetoday.com)
  • A group of scientists supporting tight controls on research in genetic manipulation has charged that opponents of such controls are misleading the public into thinking the research is safe. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The salvo from more than 50 scientists and 50 "concerned citizens" is the latest round in the battle over how much voice government and the public should have in controlling the direction of controvtrsial scientific research. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Such worries were first voiced by the scientists doing the DNA work, who declared a voluntary research moratorium while the issue was debated. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Harvard Medical School genetics professor George Church runs a genetic database that anybody - not just scientists - can access. (wmra.org)
  • In a 2013 speech to the Southern California Genealogical Society, Wells discussed its encouragement of citizen scientists: Since 2005, the Genographic Project has used the latest genetic technology to expand our knowledge of the human story, and its pioneering use of DNA testing to engage and involve the public in the research effort has helped to create a new breed of "citizen scientist. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treat's expertise is bolstered by his extensive research with chemotherapeutic drugs. (asbestos.com)
  • Though the results show overwhelming support for genetic testing and research, the public does not show a complete lack of skepticism about the field. (medpagetoday.com)
  • At the World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production meeting in August 2014 and the North American PRRS Symposium held in December 2014, the results of initial and continuing research were discussed. (thepigsite.com)
  • Results from a phase 2 clinical trial, presented by Seattle Children's Research. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • Specimens may be subject to biological patenting or research results from specimen experimentation may lead to the development of products which some entity will own. (wikipedia.org)
  • People who volunteer for medical research usually expect to remain anonymous. (wmra.org)
  • Children's Cancer Institute is an Australian medical research institute wholly dedicated to the prevention and treatment of childhood cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caulfield has published numerous articles in academic journals and popular media about a variety of topics related to ethics and the effect of media hype on medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) is a unique records-linkage research infrastructure that has existed since 1966, and allows for population-based medical research in Olmsted County, Minnesota. (wikipedia.org)
  • The REP was originally funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences in 1966 under the direction of Dr. Leonard T. Kurland, a neurologist who started his career at the NIH and moved to Olmsted County, Minnesota when he realized the great benefit to medical research that a population-based record linkage system could have. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Kurland considered Olmsted County an optimal location for such a population-based research infrastructure because the county is relatively isolated from other metropolitan centers, almost all medical care is received within the county, and all medical specialties are available to county residents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The REP includes the medical records of all persons who have ever lived in Olmsted County, Minnesota between January 1, 1966 and the present, and who have given permission for their medical information to be used for research. (wikipedia.org)
  • MN's Medical & Genetic Research Law" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)