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  • recombinant
  • New DNA is obtained by either isolating and copying the genetic material of interest using recombinant DNA methods or by artificially synthesising the DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • This relies on recombinant nucleic acid techniques to form new combinations of heritable genetic material followed by the incorporation of that material either indirectly through a vector system or directly through micro-injection, macro-injection or micro-encapsulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • advances
  • Two advances make this new branch of biological engineering possible: a better understanding of biochemical mechanisms in cells and the ability to make DNA sequences from scratch in the lab. (sciencemag.org)
  • genome
  • Knight, an electrical engineer, aimed to pare down the genome and repurpose the cell to produce things it was not originally designed to make -- plastics, say, or fuels. (sciencemag.org)
  • material
  • The techniques involve high complex manipulations of genetic material and other biologically important chemicals. (smore.com)
  • molecular
  • START COPY-- Splicing Away Regulations Down on the Animal Pharm by Susan Wright Twenty-five years ago, the first rather clumsy genetic engineering techniques were immediately recognized as aimed at the molecular basis of life. (ibiblio.org)
  • form
  • A colony of cells in an embryo self-organizes to form an organism, facilitated by the information-dense code -- the common genetic program -- embedded in each cell. (sciencemag.org)
  • Chemicals
  • The volume developed from a symposium entitled "Genetic Engi- neering of Osmoregulation: Impact on Plant Productivity for Food, Chemicals and Energy," organized by D. W. Rains and R. C. Valentine in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory and directed by D. W. Rains and A. Hollaender. (springer.com)
  • uses
  • What's most disturbing is that the genetic reconstruction of life is advancing on a global scale with almost no informed public discussion or effective oversight, and in the case of certain military uses, without even public knowledge. (ibiblio.org)
  • Many are based on intrinsic arguments as the potential uses of genetic engineering are too important to ban outright. (abpischools.org.uk)
  • possible
  • But they were also pre-emptive strikes, demonstrating that control of genetic engineering was best left in the hands of experts, and defining the problem as one that only experts could address --that of "containing" possible biohazards. (ibiblio.org)
  • Engineers propose that the future of chemical production lies in decentralized biomanufacturing facilities that will push innovation and achieve efficiency not possible at today's megaplants. (facebook.com)
  • suggests
  • candidate gene A gene whose function suggests that it may be involved in the genetic variation observed for a particular trait, e.g., the gene for growth hormone is a candidate gene for body weight. (fao.org)
  • animals
  • Is the possibility of Bio-engineering extinct species of animals and birds right?Just wondered in relation to my poem, What did we do though. (hubpages.com)
  • growth
  • I will not discuss which of these approaches are most welcome, but it did cause me to consider the speed of advance in genetic engineering, and the implications of this rapid growth. (springer.com)