Loading...
  • 2002
  • In 2002, a bizarre sect of spaceship-worshipping Raelians claimed that "Baby Eve," the clone, had already been born. (whyfiles.org)
  • organs
  • Could we clone our organs to be used in a transplant? (howstuffworks.com)
  • Xenotransplantation , or transplanting animal organs into humans, has also been examined as a potential source for organ transplants. (howstuffworks.com)
  • But if our bodies sometimes reject transplanted organs from other humans, how would they react to animal organs? (howstuffworks.com)
  • Future stem cell development for growing replacement organs may not even require cloning. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Legalizing the sale of human organs has become a very controversial topic in the last few decades. (bartleby.com)
  • Human cloning techniques, for whatever purposes, whether legal or not, are unlikely to become a routine part of mainstream healthcare, even in the still public systems of Western Europe or the privatised ones of the United States and even if the current predominant claim of 'benefits' - creating in the laboratory body-compatible cells to replace failing cells or organs - are ever realised and safety concerns (such as tumours) allayed. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • The other meaning of human cloning is the creation of human tissues of varying kinds such as skin, bone marrow, organs etc for the purposes of transplantation. (hubpages.com)
  • nucleus
  • Cloning animals involves manipulating the nucleus in a cell taken from an adult animal. (toledoblade.com)
  • The nucleus (which contains the genetic material) was removed from the egg cell using a very fine needle. (dnalc.org)
  • The egg cell now had the same genetic information as the nucleus donor mouse. (dnalc.org)
  • When an animal is cloned, the nucleus of a mature adult cell is removed and inserted into an egg whose nucleus has been removed. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • The egg has had its own nucleus and genetic material removed. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • This DNA is then placed in an enucleated human egg cell, which is just an egg cell lacking a nucleus. (princeton.edu)
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • patient's
  • Indeed, even putting aside fundamental ethical considerations other than the patient's expectations, the present state of 'therapeutic cloning' precludes, now and in the near future, any clinical application. (vatican.va)
  • National Society of Genetic Counselors
  • The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) strongly supports newborn screening for the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) as approved by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. (nsgc.org)
  • The National Society of Genetic Counselors supports newborn screening laboratories' storage and use of blood spot samples, and transparent policies to regulate these activities. (nsgc.org)
  • The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) recognizes and celebrates a person's inherent value including differences in one's physical, cognitive, or psychiatric functioning. (nsgc.org)
  • DIRECT ACCESS TO GENETIC TESTING: The National Society of Genetic Counselors believes that people interested in at-home DNA testing (also known as direct-to-consumer, DTC, or online genetic testing) have a right to make an independent, informed decision about whether to pursue this form of testing. (nsgc.org)
  • dignity
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • This respect demands that any research that is inconsistent with the dignity of the human being is morally excluded. (vatican.va)
  • 13) From an anthropological standpoint, most people recognize that cloning is offensive to human dignity. (vatican.va)
  • The Case for Caution-Being Protective of Human Dignity in the Face of Corporate Forces Taking Title to our DNA , 29 J. L. MED. (suffolk.edu)
  • Human lives, souls, and dignity are at stake! (apologeticspress.org)
  • research
  • It focuses on research in the areas of human stem cells, reproductive technologies, human cloning, genetic intervention, life-sustaining treatment and care, organ donation, and health care policy. (holyapostles.edu)
  • See Irving, "Why Accurate Human Embryology Is Needed To Evaluate Current Trends In Research Involving Stem Cells, Genetic Engineering, Synthetic Biology and Nanotechnology" (November 20, 2012), at: http://www.lifeissues.net/writers/irv/irv_206accuratehumanembryology1.html]. (lifeissues.net)
  • Similarly, if "pregnancy" and "embryo" are claimed to only begin at implantation (as the U.S. Federal Regulations for the use of human subjects in research so define these terms in the 1981 OPRR/OHRP regulations, as well as in many "professional" medical and research organizations and societies), then the early human embryo disappears once again. (lifeissues.net)
  • It explores who pays for genetic research, who regulates it, and who is expected to pay for any products resulting from it. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • Who pays for genetic research? (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • As part of its military defence strategy, moreover, the US government actively supported the development of computing which has proved essential to genetic research. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • Coaxing a human stem cell to become a liver, for instance, will require further research. (howstuffworks.com)
  • At the same time, the law allows research on cloning for therapeutic purposes with strict regulation. (publicintegrity.org)
  • On the issue of research cloning, the political climate differs from country to country. (publicintegrity.org)
  • With the help of my father, a theologian, I hope to juxtapose and illuminate today's genetic research and engineering with the Church's teachings on the sanctity of human life. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Cloning of human cells has numerous applications in medical research that may lead to cures and treatments for diseases and disabilities such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, various types of cancer, heart disease, and spinal cord injury. (bio.org)
  • Predictive Toxicology - Cloning of cells is also used as a research tool to facilitate the safe development of new drugs. (bio.org)
  • 3) By contrast, research using human embryonic stem cells has been hampered by important technical difficulties (4). (vatican.va)
  • Eventually animal research may indicate that human cloning can be accomplished with no greater risk than in vitro fertilization posed when Louise Brown, the first "test-tube baby" was born in 1978. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Yet in August 2000, it recommended that the law be amended to allow the first stages of embryo cloning and related research to go ahead legally. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • Yet in August 2000, it recommended that the law be amended to allow the first stages of embryo cloning and related research to go ahead legally, subject to a vote by Members of Parliament which is expected within the next few months. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • two of them had associations with pharmaceutical companies actively pursuing commercial developments resulting from genetic research. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • WASHINGTON (May 5, 2009)Leading congressional advocates of using human embryos in research recently admitted that they are currently drafting legislation that would authorize the federal government to fund human cloning research. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ethical issues
  • In this context the uses of genetic screening and its social and ethical issues are examined. (carey.com.au)
  • Some people feel that it could benefit humans (through cures, through solving infertility and through knowledge), while others feel it could endanger humans and is a bad thing (due to ethical issues and due to being unaware of what could happen if it didn't work). (markedbyteachers.com)
  • asexual and sexual reproduction
  • Students describe the production of gametes in sexual reproduction through the key events in meiosis and explain the differences between asexual and sexual reproduction in terms of the genetic makeup of daughter cells. (carey.com.au)
  • theoretically
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • AD, that is theoretically possible (although nobody has yet grown a human clone, as far as we know). (whyfiles.org)
  • possibility
  • The possibility also exists that a human clone could. (reference.com)
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • Some see the possibility of genetic choice as challenging the values of liberal democracy. (mit.edu)
  • Dolly's existence opened the door for speculation about the possibility of human cloning , would this new technology result in unscrupulous attempts at cloning for human reproduction, perhaps in an attempt to create designer babies? (thefreedictionary.com)
  • regulation
  • The lack of adequate regulation of genetic testing in Britain means that couples may obtain genetic tests early in pregnancy, and may then abort a child of the wrong sex (4). (hgalert.org)
  • Dr David King said: "We have been warning for years and that inadequate regulation of genetic testing could lead to sex selection via abortion. (hgalert.org)
  • Blackford argues against draconian suppression of human enhancement, although he acknowledges that some specific and limited regulation may be required in the future. (mit.edu)
  • Severino Antinori
  • According to Severino Antinori and Panos Zavos, the purpose of the cloning is to help infertile couples have a child, specifically to counter male sterility. (zavos.org)
  • advances
  • Her work in the intersection of law and medicine explores the impact of advances in science and technology on patients, physicians, and society, particularly in the realm of reproductive medicine. (uci.edu)
  • But the technological advances discussed above indicate that cloning might not be necessary to harness those valuable cells. (howstuffworks.com)
  • I've been thinking a lot lately about how the future of human reproduction might be very different from today's reality due to recent technological advances. (ipscell.com)
  • Reconciling Property Law with Advances in Reproductive Science , 6 STAN. (suffolk.edu)
  • diseases
  • In humans, however, those defects could translate into serious diseases and problems with behavior and intelligence. (toledoblade.com)
  • Specifically, I will examine Davis' application of the right to an open future argument to human cloning and testing for late-onset genetic diseases in children. (princeton.edu)
  • I will argue that this inconsistency is unacceptable, and we therefore must revise Davis' proposed standards for cloning and testing for late-onset genetic diseases to resolve the inconsistency. (princeton.edu)
  • reproductive cloning, which uses cloning technology to create a human embryo that will produce an entire human, and therapeutic, which adopt cloning into field of medical practices to find a cure for many diseases (Kass). (bartleby.com)
  • Cloned cells could be used to create replacement tissue for diseased hearts, pancreatic cells for diabetics, treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, nerve cells for victims of spinal cord injuries, and skin cells for burn victims. (encyclopedia.com)
  • technologies
  • However, especially in the last 40 years (especially since the advent of artificial reproductive technologies such as IVF and ART that involve both sexual and asexual human reproduction), there has been a dedicated effort to dumb-down such accurate scientific and medical facts, to politicize these false scientific facts, and to use frankly fraudulent science in order to push various unethical agendas. (lifeissues.net)
  • Her most recent book, The New Eugenics: Selective Breeding in an Era of Reproductive Technologies, was published by Yale University Press in 2017. (uci.edu)
  • 10. The New Reproductive Technologies. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • In Humanity Enhanced , Russell Blackford eschews the heated rhetoric that surrounds genetic enhancement technologies to examine them in the context of liberal thought, discussing the public policy issues they raise from legal and political perspectives. (mit.edu)
  • Focusing on reproductive cloning, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis of embryos, and genetic engineering, Blackford takes on objections to enhancement technologies (raised by J├╝rgen Habermas and others) based on such concerns as individual autonomy and distributive justice. (mit.edu)
  • More generally, he argues, liberal democracies would demonstrate liberal values by tolerating and accepting the emerging technologies of genetic choice. (mit.edu)
  • Blackford brilliantly demolishes the philosophical and ethical confusions of fearful opponents of emerging reproductive and genetic technologies and succinctly explains why it is moral for people to radically increase their healthy lifespans and to enhance their physical, emotional, and intellectual capacities. (mit.edu)
  • Yet the changing discourse may be instructive for other genetic and reproductive technologies which do not seem so obviously controversial. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • scientist
  • The first scientist to systematically study human embryos was Wilhelm His and the first to stage them was Franklin Mall in 1914. (all.org)
  • Prometea, left, the world's first horse clone, nuzzles the hand of Italian scientist Cesare Galli as her mother Stella Cometa looks on. (howstuffworks.com)
  • identical
  • When a couple has identical twins (or identical triplets, etc.), the children are clones of one another. (dnalc.org)
  • to make an exact genetic copy -- an identical twin. (whyfiles.org)
  • Reproductive cloning promises to give the rearing parents the kind of preferences never before possible in a baby, a baby identical genetically to a progenitor chosen by them, either one member of the couple or some one of their choice. (hubpages.com)