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  • proteins
  • You could never predict the structural similarities among these proteins from just reading the gene sequence," says Berger. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Identifying proteins selectively associated with a genomic locus provides an important entry point toward understanding how a specific gene is regulated. (pnas.org)
  • Eukaryotic gene regulation is a complex process, often coordinated by the action of tens to hundreds of proteins. (pnas.org)
  • Scientists have evidence that variants of the same gene that enables us to make connective tissue by crosslinking proteins is associated with this unusual glaucoma. (eurekalert.org)
  • They also are further refining exactly what lncLOXL1 does and how it does it by looking at what genes/proteins are affected when it's knocked out and overexpressed. (eurekalert.org)
  • The genes turned on produce the proteins responsible for the muscle adaptation" he said. (healthcanal.com)
  • We have previously identified a gene in Staphylococcus aureus, agr, whose activity is required for high-level post-exponential-phase expression of a series of secreted proteins. (asm.org)
  • They also found out that there is a whole family of NGA proteins, and showed that all of them bind to the region of the NCED3 gene that triggers its transcription. (isaaa.org)
  • Search for antibodies, proteins, shRNAs and other products associated with your gene of interest using our Gene Search Tool . (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • KNOX proteins regulate target genes that control hormone homeostasis in the meristem and interact with another subclass of homeodomain proteins called the BELL family. (biologists.org)
  • multiple genes
  • While schizophrenia is tied to multiple genes, "a more complete picture of miRNAs may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia," Tsai says. (mit.edu)
  • However, Bresnick points out that since "GATA-2 regulates multiple genes required for the stem cell production, one needs to consider how the overall genetic network mediates this critical process, and we are making significant strides in understanding the problem at this level. (biotechcareer.org)
  • mutation
  • Caprioli J, Bettinaglio P, Zipfel PF et al (2001) The molecular basis of familial hemolytic uremic syndrome: mutation analysis of factor H gene reveals a hot spot in short consensus repeat 20. (springer.com)
  • Novel Mutation in Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator Gene Causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Retinitis Pigmentosa. (nih.gov)
  • To screen the mutation in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator ( RPGR) ORF15 in a large Chinese family with X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa and describe the phenotype in affected male and female carriers. (molvis.org)
  • 3. A strain carrying an amber suppressor-sensitive mutation in the i-gene is phenotypically constitutive and also fails to show transient catabolite repression. (biochemj.org)
  • genome
  • The genes regulated by introns are often expressed in most tissues and are among the most highly expressed in the genome. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is crucial for the proper development and function of an organism that only some of the genes in its genome are expressed at a certain time, under particular conditions, or in each specific cell type. (frontiersin.org)
  • A number of potential positive and negative regulators of HIV latency identified in CARE-sponsored studies will be systematically tested including the genome organizer and transcription repressor CTCF, select receptor subunits in the immunosuppressive PDCD1 and pro-inflammatory interleukin IL22RA pathways, and a putative Tat cofactor termed TRIM32. (grantome.com)
  • histone
  • When the DNA is wrapped around the histone, the genes on that stretch of DNA remain inactive. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Esa1 chemically alters the histone, which then loosens its grip on the DNA and allows the genes to be read or switched on," says Shelley Berger, of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Next, we targeted a different genomic locus, the Drosophila melanogaster histone cluster, and identified several regulators of the essential histone locus and validated their functional association with genes within the locus. (pnas.org)
  • researchers
  • Researchers from Virginia Tech and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered one gene regulator that maintains the fast muscle type and inhibits the development of a slow muscle type. (healthcanal.com)
  • Researchers at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have identified a master genetic regulator that could account for faulty brain functions that contribute to schizophrenia. (mit.edu)
  • Researchers have found a key regulator that controls the production of early blood stem cells and adult blood system from hemogenic endothelial cells. (biotechcareer.org)
  • Researchers were able to stop the production of blood stem cells within 10 days in embryonic mice by deleting the specific sequence (+9.5) of GATA-2 gene but proved fatal in 14 days. (biotechcareer.org)
  • By identifying the bacterial genes that can alter how well microbes can colonize a plant, researchers can develop targeted approaches to improve plant health and growth for a number of applications, including increased biomass yield for biofuel production. (doe.gov)
  • downstream
  • Professor Adam Siepel's team at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) with colleagues at Cornell University led by Dr. Charles Danko, used a technology called PRO-Seq to measure nascent transcription - the generation of RNA copies of genomic DNA up- and downstream of genes. (phys.org)
  • cellular
  • The evaluation of these cellular genes in primary CD4 T cell models of HIV latency formed in memory CD4 T cells, Th17 CD4 T cells and Treg CD4 T cells promises to provide key insights into the role of these genes in HIV latency. (grantome.com)
  • atypical
  • Esparza-Gordillo J (2005) Predisposition to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome involves the concurrence of different susceptibility alleles in the regulators of complement activation gene cluster in 1q32. (springer.com)
  • Fremeaux-Bacchi V, Dragon-Durey MA, Blouin J et al (2004) Complement factor I: a susceptibility gene for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. (springer.com)
  • role
  • This shows a master regulator role for MiRNA-137 as an exciting common regulator of presynaptic function. (mit.edu)
  • The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. (medicalxpress.com)
  • But the exact role of these candidate genes in HIV latency occurring within resting primary CD4 T cells, remain unknown. (grantome.com)
  • enhancer
  • There are 3 "lines" of data for each species, with the top line in each (red for human, green for chimp) reflecting the conclusion that in this genomic space, gene enhancer activity in unactivated T-cells is very similar, with one exception: the yellow "peak" (arrows) indicates a likely gene enhancer that's active in human but inactive in chimp. (phys.org)
  • In these cases, the genes tend to be more stable, but we found each individual enhancer is more likely to change. (phys.org)
  • Sequencing
  • Sequencing of the corresponding cloned gene revealed that it is identical to RTG2 previously cloned as a pivotal gene in controlling interorganelle retrograde communication. (genetics.org)
  • diseases
  • LONDON (AP) The European Medicines Agency is recommending the first-ever approval of a gene therapy treatment in the EU, in a significant move for a type of treatment that has so far failed to deliver on its promise to cure diseases. (theusdaily.com)
  • Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to cure diseases by replacing genes that don't work. (theusdaily.com)
  • Escherichia
  • In this paper, we describe the cloning of this gene in Escherichia coli by using an inserted transposon (Tn551) as a cloning probe. (asm.org)
  • antibodies
  • We believe that just like antibodies, gene therapy will one day be a mainstay in clinical practice," he said in a statement. (theusdaily.com)
  • Variants
  • Variants of this gene are associated with the disease in every population we have studied worldwide," Liu says, including Caucasians, blacks in South Africa, the Japanese as well as Southeast Asians in India. (eurekalert.org)
  • Determining the pathogenicity of novel variants is important for enrollment of patients into gene therapy trials. (nih.gov)
  • bioenergy
  • They comprise a little-explored realm of fungi, providing a repertoire of important and valuable gene products for DOE missions in bioenergy and environment. (eurekalert.org)
  • Using genomics, we explore the diversity of fungi to develop catalogs of genes, enzymes, and pathways -- parts lists for bio-based economy and bioenergy applications," said Grigoriev. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gene Atlases of Grass-Microbe Interactions This proposal seeks to build comprehensive gene atlas maps for diverse bioenergy grass-microbe interactions, including pathogenic and beneficial interactions in two grass models, Brachypodium and Setaria. (doe.gov)
  • despite
  • Today, biologists add an important discovery to a growing body of data explaining why we're different from chimps and other primate relatives, despite the remarkable similarity of our genes. (phys.org)
  • variations
  • Genetic variations in the gene encoding a particular microRNA - miRNA-137 - have been linked with an increased risk for schizophrenia. (mit.edu)
  • We test the hypothesis that polymorphisms of the brain regulator genes MCPH1 and ASPM contribute to variations in human brain size and its correlates. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • master
  • O'Malley, senior author of the study appearing in the journal Science, said that fasting for a day can cause the blood sugar levels of mice lacking steroid receptor-2 (SRC-2)-a master regulator gene called a coactivator-to plummet, and that the animals can die if they go another day without food. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These pathways are controlled by RGS5 which makes it a kind of master regulator. (perkins.org.au)
  • species
  • The experiments revealed that while the activity of genes across the three species was quite similar in the CD4+ T cells, there were intriguing differences in the way genes were regulated. (phys.org)
  • White Rot Fungi's Size Explained by Breadth of Gene Families Involved "Armillaria species are some of the most devastating forest pathogens, responsible for forest decline in many temperate regions. (doe.gov)
  • therapy
  • China was the first country to approve a gene therapy treatment in 2003 for cancer. (theusdaily.com)
  • It is only meant for patients with the greatest need," said Monika Benstetter, an EMA spokeswoman, explaining the gene therapy is intended for people with no other treatment options. (theusdaily.com)
  • She said only a handful of gene therapy treatments had been considered before one was recommended for approval but its manufacturer withdrew it before it was finalized. (theusdaily.com)
  • Benstetter said there are no other gene therapy treatments currently under consideration by the EMA and was unsure if the agency would get more applications based on Glybera's approval. (theusdaily.com)
  • The criteria are the same for gene therapy as for any other medicines. (theusdaily.com)
  • transposon
  • The cloned gene, consisting of a 241-codon open reading frame containing the site of the transposon insertion, was recloned to an S. aureus vector, pSK265, and shown to be functional in S. aureus. (asm.org)