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  • dysphoria
  • In a meta-analysis of twin studies, nearly 40% of identical twins were concordant for gender dysphoria in comparison with none of the non-identical twins. (endocrineweb.com)
  • In a study of 250 genetic females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia who were raised as females, 95% identified as females in adulthood and 5% identified as males or with gender dysphoria, which is at least 10 to 20 times more frequent than in a control population for female-to-male transgenderism. (endocrineweb.com)
  • Role
  • Like an individual's concept of his or her sex role , gender identity develops by means of parental example, social reinforcement, and language. (britannica.com)
  • The data that support a role of biology in gender identity development basically come from three different biomedical disciplines: from genetics, endocrinology, and brain studies. (endocrineweb.com)
  • 2 "This suggests that prenatal and early postnatal androgens play some role in gender identity development," Dr. Rosenthal said. (endocrineweb.com)
  • generally
  • Basic gender identity-the concept "I am a boy" or "I am a girl"-is generally established by the time the child reaches the age of three and is extremely difficult to modify thereafter. (britannica.com)
  • Health
  • This means that no one can be discriminated against because of their gender identity or because of a health care provider's stereotype about sex - what a man or a woman "ought to look like. (thetaskforceblog.org)
  • data
  • Compelling data now suggest that gender identity is not simply a psychosexual construct, but that it is influenced by biology, environmental, and cultural factors," explained Dr. Rosenthal, who is Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Medical Director of the Child & Adolescent Gender Center at University of California in San Francisco. (endocrineweb.com)
  • child
  • both physiologic and social factors contribute to the early establishment of a core identity, which is modified and expanded by social factors as the child matures. (britannica.com)