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  • resection
  • Patients with early gastric cancer were randomly treated with H. pylori antibiotics after surgical resection and were followed up for three years. (innovations-report.com)
  • Fifty seven were found to have gastric cancer, 36 being treated by potentially curative resection, including 15 with early cancer. (bmj.com)
  • In non-standard gastrectomy, the extent of gastric resection and/or lymphadenectomy is altered according to the tumor characteristics. (springer.com)
  • 2.1.1.2.1 Modified surgery The extent of gastric resection and/or lymphadenectomy is reduced compared to standard surgery. (springer.com)
  • Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer, Therapeutic Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Oliviu Pascu, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/24614. (intechopen.com)
  • pylori
  • Patients who received antibiotic treatment had a significantly lower risk of developing gastric cancer, confirming the importance of careful management of H. pylori. (innovations-report.com)
  • It is thought that certain strains of H. pylori (especially east-Asian cytotoxin-associated gene [cagA]-positive strains) might carry an increased risk of developing gastric cancer, but currently identified cagA genotypes in the Asia-Pacific are not associated with cancer. (innovations-report.com)
  • The study does have several limitations, including the fact that it is observational and was done in Hong Kong, where there are well recognized specific risks for gastric cancer in Asian patients, including diet and high rates of H. pylori. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • Led by Wai Keung Leung, MBChB, MD, from Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, the study looked at H. pylori infection and its relationship with gastric cancer, among other outcomes. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • Despite the study's limitations, Dr Leung and colleagues state that, to their knowledge, "this is the first study to demonstrate that long-term PPIs use, even after H. pylori eradication therapy, is still associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • This is likely related to the profound acid suppression of PPIs that worsens atrophic gastritis, particularly in those patients with established gastric atrophy as a result of chronic H. pylori-induced inflammation. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • Recently completed randomised trials in Colombia, China, and Mexico indicate that curing the H pylori infection results in a modest slow down of the precancerous process but does not prevent all cancers. (bmj.com)
  • Discoveries in the past decade have determined that most gastric cancer is caused by a bacterium called H. pylori that induces chronic inflammation of the stomach (gastritis). (uwgi.org)
  • UW researchers are developing microarray gene probes to identify H. pylori species that are pathogenic and will lead to chronic inflammation and eventually cancer. (uwgi.org)
  • disease
  • The prognosis of the disease is very poor because gastric cancer fails to display specific stages until it becomes advanced. (qiagen.com)
  • Gastric cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the stomach. (oncolink.org)
  • Age, diet, and stomach disease can affect the risk of developing gastric cancer. (oncolink.org)
  • Further, vagotomized DU (duodenal ulcer) patients had a greater risk of noncardia gastric cancer in the first decade after the operation when compared to unoperated patients with the same disease, but this excess disappeared when 10 years had elapsed. (medpagetoday.com)
  • In fact, when you look at the data, you find that it was only patients who had been admitted to the hospital for severe duodenal ulcer disease who had the marked reduction in gastric cancer. (medpagetoday.com)
  • We have learned from this research that there may be a role for this approach in the treatment of gastric cancer, a disease that is notoriously discovered at a late stage in the U.S. and poorly responsive to currently available standard chemotherapy. (medpagetoday.com)
  • However, we still need specific new systemic agents, based on our underlying understanding of gastric cancer biology, to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease. (redorbit.com)
  • researchers
  • An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. (innovations-report.com)
  • Researchers noted whether the study participants consumed wine, beer or liquor regularly, and the location and severity of their gastric cancer, if any. (livescience.com)
  • Researchers found that people who regularly consumed more than 60 grams of alcohol (equivalent to four to five beers) a day had a 65 percent higher risk of developing gastric cancer over the study period than people who regularly drank 0.1 to 4.9 grams of alcohol a day (less than a beer). (livescience.com)
  • When researchers looked purely at beer consumption (instead of general alcohol consumption), gastric cancer risk increased, as it did when the researchers looked at people who were heavy drinkers and had the gene variant rs1230025. (livescience.com)
  • Researchers aren't sure why only beer seems to produce this gastric cancer risk and not wine or liquor, Duell said, but it could be a combination of higher consumption of beer than wine or liquor, and the specific carcinogens that are produced when beer is metabolized. (livescience.com)
  • Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now identified two mechanisms through which this bacterium can cause gastric cancer. (innovations-report.com)
  • infection
  • At present, there are no effective therapies for gastric cancer and growing spread of antibiotic resistances is further complicating treatment of the infection. (innovations-report.com)
  • According to the American Cancer Society, long-term infection of the stomach with this germ may lead to pre-cancerous changes of the inner lining of the stomach. (healthcentral.com)
  • Individuals at the highest risk should be cured of their infection and monitored endoscopically to detect dysplasia and "early" cancer, amenable to successful treatment. (bmj.com)
  • Patients
  • OBJECTIVE--To see whether investigation of dyspeptic patients aged over 40 after their first consultation with the general practitioner would increase the proportions with early and operable gastric cancers. (bmj.com)
  • DESIGN--Prospective study of gastric cancer in dyspeptic patients aged over 40 from a defined population. (bmj.com)
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Increase in early and operable gastric cancers detected in middle aged patients with dyspepsia. (bmj.com)
  • Patients with suspected cancer should be referred via the standard two week wait referral proforma from the Healthy London Partnership website . (guysandstthomas.nhs.uk)
  • Like you're alluding to, I think we're seeing more and more gastric patients, particularly in the west, that are getting to third-line and potentially fourth-line therapies. (onclive.com)
  • In a study of peritoneal cancer (PC) diagnosis, investigators found that the administration of carbonated water for dual-time point imaging may improve the accuracy of FDG PET/CT scanning for PC in patients previously diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). (medscape.com)
  • We found a significantly greater risk for noncardia gastric cancer among DU patients who underwent vagotomy, compared with unoperated DU patients, but only during the first 10 [years] after the operation. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Gastritis patients from certain geographic areas are more prone to developing cancer of the stomach. (uwgi.org)
  • The clinical trial was conducted on 355 patients with advanced gastric cancer, 238 of whom received treatment with ramucirumab, while 117 received placebo. (redorbit.com)
  • Second, the study results open new avenues for patients with gastric cancer, offering more treatment options. (redorbit.com)
  • Following first-line gastric cancer chemotherapy, with a median survival of 8 to 10 months, most national medicines agencies have approved second-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. (redorbit.com)
  • gastrointestinal
  • Altered expression of MiR-148a and MiR-152 in gastrointestinal cancers and its clinical significance. (springer.com)
  • With an emphasis on animal models, but also considerable attention to human studies, host genetics and the role of bacterial factors and other environmental factors influencing the pathogenesis of gastric cancer, the topics presented in this book should be of interest to clinicians and investigators interested in gastrointestinal cancer, as well as basic investigators in related areas of cancer research. (springer.com)
  • Pathways
  • Pathways affected by gastric cancer normally regulate cell growth and differentiation including cell cycle, hedgehog, PI3K/AKT, Notch, TGFβ/BMP, and WNT. (qiagen.com)
  • The fact that gastric cancer affects 3 times as many men than women suggests a protective effect by estrogen and its signaling pathways. (qiagen.com)
  • The Human Cancer PathwayFinder RT² Profiler PCR Array profiles the expression of 84 genes representative of 9 different biological pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis. (qiagen.com)
  • risk
  • Heavy beer drinkers have an increased risk of gastric cancer, especially if they possess a certain gene variant, a new study suggests. (livescience.com)
  • People who drink two to three beers a day for many years have a 75 percent increased risk of gastric cancer, and those who have the gene variant called rs1230025 but aren't heavy drinkers have a 30 percent higher risk of gastric cancer, compared with people who drank less than a beer daily, the study showed. (livescience.com)
  • But people who are both chronic heavy beer drinkers and possess rs1230025 have a more than 700 percent increased risk of gastric cancer compared with people who consume less than one drink a day and don't have the gene variation,said study researcher Eric Duell, a senior epidemiologist at the Catalan Institute of Oncology in Barcelona, Spain. (livescience.com)
  • Consumption of wine and liquor did not show elevated risk of gastric cancer,' which could be because heavy drinkers may be more likely to drink beer than other alcoholic beverages. (livescience.com)
  • The findings are correlated, meaning there is a link between beer drinking and gastric cancer risk, but the results can't speak to whether one caused the other or some other factor is responsible. (livescience.com)
  • And if heavy drinkers tend to drink more beer than wine or liquor, then those low amounts of acetaldehyde and NDMA could build up to increase gastric cancer risk, he said. (livescience.com)
  • Next, Duell and his colleagues hope to do additional research to find more gene variants that could have an effect on gastric cancer risk. (livescience.com)
  • Heavy beer consumption increases the risk of gastric cancer, and the risk is even higher if you possess a common gene variant. (livescience.com)
  • Are You at Risk for Gastric Cancer? (healthcentral.com)
  • According to the American Cancer Society, the risk is particularly high for cancer of the upper portion of the stomach near the esophagus. (healthcentral.com)
  • The use of tobacco products , including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and chewing tobacco, is a major risk factor for esophageal cancer . (healthcentral.com)
  • The more a person uses tobacco and the longer it is used, the higher the cancer risk. (healthcentral.com)
  • A study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences in 2012 found that people with type O blood showed a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer compared with non-O type blood groups. (healthcentral.com)
  • When I was "growing up" as a physician and oncologist I remember being taught the opposite, namely that vagotomy increased the risk of gastric cancer, perhaps because of delayed gastric emptying. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Certainly doesn't sound like vagotomy decreased the risk of gastric cancer, does it? (medpagetoday.com)