Loading...
  • Adult
  • The adult olive fruit fly is very small-about 5 mm long with a wingspan of 10 mm (Weems 1966). (ufl.edu)
  • The thorax and abdomen of the adult fly are mostly dark-brown to black, with yellow-brown markings and short, silvery hairs (Weems 1966) (Figure 2). (ufl.edu)
  • 2000
  • The female olive fruit fly has been reported to lay as many as 500 eggs in her lifetime of less than six months (Rice 2000). (ufl.edu)
  • In warm areas with abundant host plants, like California, the olive fruit fly may produce up to five or six generations per year (Rice 2000). (ufl.edu)
  • olive fru
  • The olive fruit fly is found almost anywhere cultivated olives are grown or wild olives naturally occur. (ufl.edu)
  • 2006). Newly deposited eggs of the olive fruit fly are opaque and creamy white in color. (ufl.edu)
  • Damage thresholds for the olive fruit fly vary by region, but are typically low. (ufl.edu)
  • Field sanitation is a critical step in preventing outbreaks of the olive fruit fly. (ufl.edu)
  • genetic
  • Genetic studies suggest that this fruit fly is native to Africa, where its original host plants were wild precursors of the cultivated olive (Nardi et al. (ufl.edu)