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  • Haruko Obokata
  • In two papers published in January in Nature , Haruko Obokata at the Riken Center for Developmental Biology in Japan and her colleagues startled the world by showing that simply exposing blood cells of newborn mice to a stress like mild acid was enough to reboot them into becoming "pluripotent" - in other words capable of generating any tissue. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • Haruko Obokata (小保方 晴子, Obokata Haruko, born 1983) is a former stem-cell biologist and research unit leader at Japan's Laboratory for Cellular Reprogramming, Riken Center for Developmental Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • This work was published in 2014, but soon found to be due to fraudulent work by Haruko Obokata. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethical lapses
  • He was lauded as a national hero in South Korea before it emerged that his research was fraudulent and riddled with ethical lapses. (hindustantimes.com)
  • He has publicly apologized for the ethical lapses and quit as head of the World Stem Cell Hub, an international project he had launched in October that envisioned California and British labs in addition to a facility in Korea. (foxnews.com)
  • identical
  • A cloned cell should be identical to its donor, but the probe found that of 48 common genetic variations, or markers, present in the 2004 cells, eight did not match their apparent donor. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The clients) understand that a clone is an identical twin of the original pet, but also has a lot of genetic predispositions and the potential to develop as the original pet," Wang said. (hindustantimes.com)
  • third-party source needed] Clone phishing is a type of phishing attack whereby a legitimate, and previously delivered, email containing an attachment or link has had its content and recipient address(es) taken and used to create an almost identical or cloned email. (wikipedia.org)
  • Korean
  • In their paper, Daley and colleagues report that the SNPs in the Korean cell line do indeed match toward the center of the chromosomes, similar to five parthenogenetic mouse cell lines that the team created for comparison. (scientificamerican.com)
  • How long until North Korean agents kidnap him in order to clone their glorious leader? (techdirt.com)
  • The Korea Times reported on June 10, 2007, that Seoul National University fired him, and the South Korean government canceled his financial support and barred him from engaging in stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • All the above techniques were systematically tested in various combinations on 1000 monkey eggs before ensuring the same in human cells to ensure high success rates. (biotecharticles.com)
  • At Dr. Melton's lab, embryonic stem cells from fertilized human eggs are part of a search for a cure to Type 1 diabetes. (nytimes.com)
  • Now it's true, we use fertilized human eggs to derive embryonic stem cells. (nytimes.com)
  • Dr. Mitalipov said the technique was efficient enough that one donation - which can include multiple eggs - would probably be enough to generate a stem cell line, even accounting for failures. (nytimes.com)
  • experiments
  • He was a professor of theriogenology and biotechnology at Seoul National University (dismissed on March 20, 2006) who became infamous for fabricating a series of experiments, which appeared in high-profile journals, in the field of stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shortly after that his human cloning experiments were revealed to be fraudulent. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • We have cloned many different animals at this point-cats, dogs, sheep-and there is very little holding us back from cloning humans except ethics and law. (scientificamerican.com)
  • It's entirely conceivable that we will see humans cloned for medical or reproductive purposes in the coming decades. (scientificamerican.com)
  • With the success in the creation of Dolly, the first mammal clone a quest to replicate the success in humans ensued but with limited success. (biotecharticles.com)
  • Although the markers for bone marrow stem cells are well defined in humans, many investigators use CD34+ which is a maker for hematopoietic stem cells (i.e. stem cells that make blood cells). (rutgers.edu)
  • Spore-like cells were said to be a specific class of stem cells in adult organisms, including humans, which are small, versatile, and most frequently remain in a dormant "spore-like" state as the rest of the cells of the organism divide, grow, and die. (wikipedia.org)
  • fraud
  • Two main types are cloning and subscriber fraud, which are both illegal under the Wireless Telephone Protection Act. (fcc.gov)
  • What is cell phone cloning fraud? (fcc.gov)
  • To prevent cell phone cloning fraud, ask your service provider about authentication systems installed by device manufacturers as a countermeasure. (fcc.gov)
  • While being charged with fraud and embezzlement, he has kept a relatively low profile at the Sooam Bioengineering Research Institute in Yongin, Gyeonggi Province, where he currently leads research efforts on creating cloned pig embryos and using them to make embryonic stem-cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Fraud that involves cell phones, insurance claims, tax return claims, credit card transactions etc. represent significant problems for governments and businesses, but yet detecting and preventing fraud is not a simple task. (wikipedia.org)
  • pluripotent
  • After being exposed to mild acid for 30 minutes, blood cells known as "CD45 lymphocytes" form clusters of tiny cells that turn out to be pluripotent - capable of forming any tissue. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • These are called induced pluripotent stem cells. (nytimes.com)
  • Please note that we did not know that there were pluripotent stem cells in bone marrow until 1999. (rutgers.edu)
  • Spore-like cells were proposed to be pluripotent cells that lie dormant in animal tissue and become active under stress or injury as adult stem cells, exhibiting behavior characteristic of spores. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vacanti presented these results in July 2012 at the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists conference, and then in January 2014 the journal Nature published two articles suggesting that a simple acid treatment could cause mouse blood cells to become pluripotent. (wikipedia.org)
  • researcher
  • I think this is an extremely important-and solid-paper," says stem cell researcher Robert Lanza, vice president of research and scientific development at Applied Cell Technology, a regenerative medicine company headquartered in Alameda, Calif., who did not take part in the study. (scientificamerican.com)
  • and cloning provides a psychological alternative to the traditional method of just letting the pet go and keeping their memory," said Wang Jae-Woong, a researcher and spokesman for Sooam. (hindustantimes.com)
  • University of Pittsburgh researcher Gerald Schatten has demanded that the journal Science remove him as the senior author of a report it published in June to international acclaim that detailed how individual stem cell colonies were created for 11 patients through cloning. (foxnews.com)
  • A researcher holds a box containing viles of human embryonic stem-cell cultures at a lab in La Jolla, Ca. After approving nearly $45 million for embryonic stem-cell research in February, California's stem-cell agency has authorized another $75.7 million to fund research in the field. (npr.org)
  • Researcher Mariusz Ratajczak has linked spore-like cells to his idea of Very small embryonic-like stem cells, also proposed to be very small adult stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • Pristine and prolific, cells like these could supply whatever you needed to fix your organs: fresh brain, liver or pancreas cells, for instance. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • Teruhiko Wakayama was the first to clone mice and Yoshiki Sasai is revered for his ability to sculpt organs from stem cells. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • That raises the hope that one day the cells will be turned into replacement tissue or even replacement organs to treat a host of diseases. (nytimes.com)
  • Many types of stem cells are present in fetuses, associated with the various organs of the body that are developing. (rutgers.edu)
  • Dolly
  • The embryo-creation technique is essentially the same as that used to create Dolly the sheep and the many cloned animals that have followed. (nytimes.com)
  • research
  • This article will address gender reassignment surgery, stem cell therapy and research, cloning, face transplants, and cancer treatment and research. (thailawforum.com)
  • High profile clients have included Princess Shaikha Latifah of Dubai who cloned her pet dog in 2015 and helped launch a joint research study into cloning camel breeds known for high milk production. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The centre does not conduct any human stem cell research after being repeatedly denied a state approval to do so. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Religious conservatives were among the most vocal early opponents of human cloning, stem cell research, and related procedures, and many liberals and progressives reflexively assumed that the enlightened position was therefore to embrace these technologies. (worldwatch.org)
  • It's not good,' said Rudolf Jaenisch, a leading stem cell scientist at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass. (foxnews.com)
  • The third hat is of Doctors Against Cloning an informal grouping of doctors who want to tell the truth about embryo stem cell research and was formed less than 2 weeks ago. (chooselifeaustralia.org.au)
  • The central ethical misconception is that cloned embryos are not embryos, and therefore creating them for research does not violate research ethics. (chooselifeaustralia.org.au)
  • This political strategy to redefine the cloned embryo was formulated last year by the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and was criticized as 'evasive' by the respected journal Nature ( Playing the name game: stem cell biologists should not try to change the definition of the word 'embryo' , July, 2005). (chooselifeaustralia.org.au)
  • Consequently DOCTORS AGAINST CLONING will direct public attention to stem cell research that is both ethical and effective. (chooselifeaustralia.org.au)
  • Even before President Bush barred federal financing for most human embryonic stem cell research in August 2001, the work of Dr. Melton was mired in controversy. (nytimes.com)
  • Fortunately, stem cell research is not dependent on one discovery. (nytimes.com)
  • The Conference of Catholic Bishops, for instance, said Wednesday that the research "will be taken up by those who want to produce cloned children as 'copies' of other people. (nytimes.com)
  • Attempts to use either type of cell for therapy remain at the early stages of research, so it is not clear which will turn out to be better. (nytimes.com)
  • The research makes them leading contenders in the race towards human cloning. (pearltrees.com)
  • Political pressure to expand the level of government-funded stem cell research has increased amid ongoing reports of the potential medical efficacy of such treatments. (newsbatch.com)
  • The medical possibilities which might result from stem cell research continues to excite the scientific community. (newsbatch.com)
  • Some of his family members have been vocal advocates of the potential of stem cell research to provide treatments for such conditions and his son spoke at the Democratic convention on the subject. (newsbatch.com)
  • Voters in California recently approved a ballot measure to establish a public funded stem cell research program in that state. (newsbatch.com)
  • The 2008 Republican platform continues to reflect the party's religious based opposition to embryonic stem cell research. (newsbatch.com)
  • Current research projects have obtained stem cells from tissue which has been removed during terminated pregnancies or from embryos produced by in- vitro fertilization clinics. (newsbatch.com)
  • But federal restrictions on human embryonic stem-cell research have prompted several state governments to take matters into their own hands. (npr.org)
  • State governments have taken the unusual step of funding biomedical research - usually done with federal grants - because of federal political decisions to restrict funding for embryonic stem-cell research. (npr.org)
  • By action, the governor means a ballot measure approved by California voters that provides $300 million a year for stem-cell research for the next decade. (npr.org)
  • There are only going to be a few cutting-edge stem-cell research centers built around the world, whether Cambridge, England or Cambridge, Massachusetts or Connecticut, and they're all getting rooted right now," he said. (npr.org)
  • So we have gotten in the game, and we will be one of those stem-cell research centers. (npr.org)
  • After completing her master's, Obokata went on to study stem cells and regenerative medicine at the Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, a cooperative research and education facility operated with Tokyo Women's Medical University. (wikipedia.org)
  • babies
  • I predicted that human cloning would be with us in 10 years and I still believe that is the case, because there is a demand among a small number of people for this technology to have babies. (pearltrees.com)
  • tissues
  • But tissues created from those stem cells would not genetically match a patient, meaning steps might be needed to prevent rejection. (nytimes.com)
  • They could be used to produce perfectly-matched 'spare part' tissues for transplant - avoiding the risk of rejection as the cells are taken from the patient's own body Experts predict that treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and diabetes could be available within three years. (pearltrees.com)
  • This is because these cells can be made to replicate specific human tissues. (newsbatch.com)
  • These are cells collected from a variety of tissues, including peripheral blood. (rutgers.edu)
  • believed that these unique cells lie dormant until activated by injury or disease, and that they have the potential to regenerate tissues lost to disease or damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • pluripotency
  • From 25% to 50% of the blood cells could be converted, a staggering percentage given that the iPS technique often achieves less than 1% conversion of skin or blood cells to pluripotency. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • She claimed to have developed a radical and remarkably easy way to make stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP) cells that could be grown into tissue for use anywhere in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • She tried to replicate her own study using genetically manipulated mouse spleen cells that glow green if a gene indicative of pluripotency is activated. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • A series of genetic markers sprinkled throughout the cells' chromosomes show the same pattern found in parthenogenetic mice as opposed to cloned mice, according to a report published online today in the journal Cell Stem Cell . (scientificamerican.com)
  • fertility
  • Being a fertility specialist from Sendai, Japan, the job of sectioning and transferring the cells to new culture media for detecting growth patterns was handled with expertise. (biotecharticles.com)
  • AGreenRoad Project - Teaching A Science Of Sustainable Health/Success: Human Fertility Clinics Drive Human Cloning Attempts - At $50,000 Per Attempt, It Will Make Them Very Rich. (pearltrees.com)
  • Dogs
  • Since 2006, the facility has cloned nearly 800 dogs, commissioned by owners or state agencies seeking to replicate their best sniffer and rescue dogs. (hindustantimes.com)
  • world
  • One well publicised cloning was of Trakr, a former police dog hailed as a hero after discovering the last survivor of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center. (hindustantimes.com)
  • For example, Alzheimer's is often raised as potentially curable with stem cells, even though world authorities such as Professor Colin Masters of Melbourne University dismiss such suggestions. (chooselifeaustralia.org.au)
  • citation needed
  • Because the cell-size of less than 5 micrometers seems rather small as to contain the entire human genome the authors speculate on the "concept of a minimal genome"[citation needed] for these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Work on stem cells, the body's mother cells that can develop into any kind of tissue, may herald a medical revolution. (pearltrees.com)
  • These cells are unique because at this stage in development they are not specialized and have the capacity to develop into 130 different human tissue types. (newsbatch.com)
  • These cells offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissue to treat a myriad of diseases, conditions, and disabilities including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, spinal cord injury, stroke, burns, heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. (newsbatch.com)
  • Despite their dormancy, they apparently retain the ability to grow, divide, and differentiate into other cell types expressing characteristics appropriate to the tissue environment from which they were initially isolated, if some external stimulus should prompt them to do so. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spore-like cells were said to remain viable in unprepared tissue (using no special preservation techniques), frozen at -86 °C and then thawed, or heated to 85 °C for more than 30 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charles Vacanti continued to work on these cells when he moved to Harvard, including with thoracic surgeon Koji Kojima who identified them in lung tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • potentially
  • A stable cell line can be created to genetically match the donor through various harvesting and culturing and can become potentially all types of cell of the human body. (biotecharticles.com)
  • A fraudulent COCOT provider could potentially auto-dial 1-800 wrong numbers and get paid for these as "calls received from a payphone" with charges reversed. (wikipedia.org)
  • animals
  • Some have sought clones of other pets like cats, snakes and even chinchillas, but Wang said the demand for such animals was too small to justify the cost. (hindustantimes.com)
  • This capacity to continue to regenerate new cells has been shown in in vitro conditions for some animals in which all other cells have died, especially if the animal died from exposure to cold elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • naturally
  • The team hope to begin work on the second cloned Saber-Tooth Tiger within the next 2 months and when the two reach maturity, they will be breed naturally. (pearltrees.com)
  • lines
  • On March 9, 2009, President Obama issued an executive order removing the restriction on federal funding for newer stem cell lines. (newsbatch.com)
  • Despite
  • Despite inconclusive results, a new technique has reignited interest in the idea that normal cells can rally in response to stress and help repair the body. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • But despite the worrisome chatter on the web, there are good reasons to keep an open mind, says Martin Pera, a stem cell pioneer at the University of Melbourne. (cosmosmagazine.com)
  • Despite the ever present public fear of misutilization of cloning procedures, little success has been achieved in the animal cloning procedures thus lying to rest the hysteria associated with cloning. (biotecharticles.com)
  • vitro
  • Scientists used them to develop cell cloning, in vitro fertilization, and isolation of stem cells, as well as to research AIDS, cancer, and the effects of radiation and toxic substances. (berkeleysciencereview.com)
  • This capacity to continue to regenerate new cells has been shown in in vitro conditions for some animals in which all other cells have died, especially if the animal died from exposure to cold elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • spinal cord i
  • 10, 2003 (Atty Docket No. IRVN-009WO, entitled "Oligodendrocytes Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells fro Remyelination and Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury," which application was filed in English and designating the United States, which application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. (blogspot.in)
  • Obokata
  • This work was published in 2014, but soon found to be due to fraudulent work by Haruko Obokata. (wikipedia.org)
  • Haruko Obokata (小保方 晴子, Obokata Haruko, born 1983) is a former stem-cell biologist and research unit leader at Japan's Laboratory for Cellular Reprogramming, Riken Center for Developmental Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • After completing her master's, Obokata went on to study stem cells and regenerative medicine at the Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, a cooperative research and education facility operated with Tokyo Women's Medical University. (wikipedia.org)
  • service
  • But given the success of GloFish, and the overwhelming interest received by a (failed) cat cloning service and a ( possibly fraudulent ) hypoallergenic kitty company, it's hard not to wonder whether these cats are destined to be marketed as novelty pets. (wordpress.com)
  • acquiring a download the burnt house from the public young medicine, he were that our universities need the writer of methods of cloud-based people, and that degradomics and cycles can As continue subsequent east products, cloning important service to impressionistic expectations for the order of pathological data such as aim. (procurio-me.com)
  • Slamming is any fraudulent, unauthorized change to the default long-distance/Local carrier or DSL internet service selection for a subscriber's line, most often made by dishonest vendors desirous to steal business from competing service providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • make
  • Today, Berkeley scientists have a wider array of cell lines to choose from, but HeLa's familiarity and hardy growth continues to make it a popular choice. (berkeleysciencereview.com)
  • In this approach (below) bacteria are engineered to find cancer cells, make lots of baby bacteria until they reach a large enough colony size then do a mass self-destructo at the cancer site - releasing a tumor killing drug. (joannenova.com.au)
  • Almost
  • third-party source needed] Clone phishing is a type of phishing attack whereby a legitimate, and previously delivered, email containing an attachment or link has had its content and recipient address(es) taken and used to create an almost identical or cloned email. (wikipedia.org)
  • paper
  • In February 2004, Hwang and his team announced that they had successfully created an embryonic stem cell with the somatic cell nuclear transfer method, and published their paper in the March 12 issue of Science. (wikipedia.org)
  • instead
  • After understanding that many buyers like lookalike phones, but didn't need blaring fake logos, many manufacturers adopted a practice of not using fraudulent logos, instead opting for a generically designed logo. (wikipedia.org)
  • The call appears to originate from the business (instead of the original fraudulent caller) and appears on the company's phone bill. (wikipedia.org)
  • original
  • CECT offers unauthorized clones or replicas of the Apple Inc. iPhone and various Nokia cell phones manufactured in China and sold at a fraction of the price of the original. (wikipedia.org)
  • expert
  • A stem-cell expert would probably never have even bothered to try the experiment Vacanti has been pursuing, on and off, since the late 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • business
  • He usually takes the name of "Máximo Cozzetti", which he took from a fraudulent lender who ran an illegal lending business (episode 2.8). (wikipedia.org)
  • human cell
  • HeLa cells have been infected with an array of diseases, from tuberculosis to salmonella, and have helped scientists understand that a normal human cell has 46 chromosomes, thus making genetic disorders easier to diagnose. (berkeleysciencereview.com)
  • years
  • In July 2005, a series of articles in the BMJ chronicled the perseverance of its previous editor, Richard Smith, who over a period of more than 10 years had attempted to investigate and publicly expose as fraudulent, the 1992 publication by Dr. Ram B. Singh, a private practitioner from Moradabad, India, and six co-authors. (blogspot.com)
  • cancer
  • Left: Fluorescent red cancer cells lined with the fluorescent green blood vessels of a fluorescent green mouse. (wordpress.com)
  • reports
  • Forensic analytics might be used to review the invoicing activity for a vendor to identify fictitious vendors, and these techniques might also be used by a franchisor to detect fraudulent or erroneous sales reports by the franchisee in a franchising environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Various
  • Various combinations of differentiation factors and mitogens can be used to produce cell populations that are over 95% homogeneous in morphological appearance, and the _expression of oligodendrocyte markers such as GalC. (blogspot.in)
  • times
  • The Korea Times reported on June 10, 2007, that Seoul National University fired him, and the South Korean government canceled his financial support and barred him from engaging in stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • mouse
  • Vacanti presented these results in July 2012 at the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists conference, and then in January 2014 the journal Nature published two articles suggesting that a simple acid treatment could cause mouse blood cells to become pluripotent. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • These cells can be driven to yield a high purity population of a desired lineage for a specific cell replacement strategy reducing the influence of environmental signals on the transplant population. (blogspot.in)
  • claims
  • he controversial cult which claims to have cloned five babies says it has discovered a way of reversing the ageing process. (macrumors.com)
  • months
  • Hwang's next claim came only two months later in April 1999, when he announced the cloning of a Korean cow, Jin-i, also without providing any scientifically verifiable data. (wikipedia.org)
  • actually
  • The group are aided by Earth-2's Flash Jay Garrick before they learn that he is actually a time remnant clone of Hunter Zolomon, who is Zoom, and he steals Barry's Speed Force to cure his terminal illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • 60 Minutes" talked about embryonic stem cells on February 26, 2006, including a dicussion of work by Hans Keirstead. (blogspot.in)
  • Nature
  • Stem cell critics also noted that the images in the published articles are very similar to those published in Obokata's doctoral thesis, which were from a quite different project than the Nature publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • technology
  • In February 2011, Hwang visited Libya as part of a $133 million project in the North African country to build a stem cell research center and transfer relevant technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Let them think they can cure aging and can clone people, thats fine--but I don't need it to be such a huge media event. (macrumors.com)
  • i don't think anyone's disputing this, but these are the people who announced the first human clone-- what, a year ago? (macrumors.com)
  • study
  • Not only did they grow vigorously, making it easy to amass the enormous quantity of cells required for the study, but they also become easily infected by the poliomyelitis virus. (berkeleysciencereview.com)
  • patent
  • At least one reseller has been subject to legal demands from Apple Inc.. One company that earned notoriety for producing shanzhai smartphones is Goophone, which in 2012 was reported to have filed a patent for the "Goophone i5", a MediaTek-powered clone marketed prior to the real iPhone 5's official release. (wikipedia.org)