• However, they have often been associated with a variety of adverse effects including spread of vaccine virus to non-vaccinates, inadequate attenuation, production of latently infected carriers, and increased virulence as a result of in vivo passage. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Although many vector-based approaches have demonstrated partial efficacy in non-human primate studies, live-attenuated virus (LAV) 3 vaccine using SIV have consistently shown more efficient protection in macaque studies ( 6 , 7 , 8 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of a novel survivin-based vaccine by subcutaneous or intraperitoneum injection of BALB/c mice with murine fiber-induced MM tumor cells followed by vaccination with recombinant Fowlpox virus replicons encoding survivin. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Considering the high number of new cases of cervical cancer each year that are caused by human papilloma viruses (HPVs), the development of an effective vaccine for prevention and therapy of HPV-associated cancers, and in particular against the high-risk HPV-16 genotype, remains a priority. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The viruses are considered safe to modify into a vaccine that help the body's own immune system kill off cancer cells. (asbestos.com)
  • This is where the fowlpox vaccine comes in handy - it was the perfect vehicle to deliver the survivin to the tumors. (asbestos.com)
  • They then provided a dose of the survivin-laced fowlpox vaccine. (asbestos.com)
  • The fowlpox vaccine is our first attempt to induce an immune response against mesothelioma cells that can be used for both therapeutic and preventive purposes. (asbestos.com)
  • The fowlpox vaccine could help patients avoid those serious side effects, which often include severe nausea and hair loss. (asbestos.com)
  • This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The development of a safe, affordable and effective HIV-1 vaccine remains a priority especially in sub-Saharan Africa where the hypervariability of the virus poses the greatest challenge. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Abortive infection in mammalian cells (no production of progeny viruses) and their ability to accommodate multiple gene inserts are some of the characteristics that make APVs promising vaccine vectors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This review summarizes the current knowledge relating to APVs, including classification, morphogenesis, host-virus interactions, diagnostics and disease, and also highlights the use of APVs as recombinant vaccine vectors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This review summarizes current knowledge of APVs as avian pathogens, including classification, morphogenesis, host-virus interactions, diagnosis, as well as issues relevant to their use as recombinant vaccine vectors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Compare the clinical response in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with immunization with recombinant fowlpox vaccine administered either intravenously or intramuscularly, with or without interleukin-2 (IL-2). (knowcancer.com)
  • Cohort 1: Patients receive recombinant fowlpox virus encoding gp100 peptide (fowlpox vaccine) IV once every 4 weeks for up to 4 doses. (knowcancer.com)
  • Cohort 2: Patients receive fowlpox vaccine intramuscularly (IM) once every 4 weeks for up to 4 doses. (knowcancer.com)
  • IV or IM* once every 4 weeks for 4 doses and IL-2 IV every 8 hours for a maximum of 12 doses beginning 24 hours after fowlpox vaccine. (knowcancer.com)
  • Upon disease progression, patients receive fowlpox vaccine as above and IL-2 IV every 8 hours for a maximum of 12 doses beginning 24 hours after fowlpox vaccine. (knowcancer.com)
  • Patients with no response or progressive disease in cohorts not receiving IL-2 may be treated with fowlpox vaccine and IL-2 as in cohort 3. (knowcancer.com)
  • The seminal observation of their utility for delivery of vaccine antigens to non-avian species has driven much of the interest in this group of viruses. (springer.com)
  • Skinner MA, Laidlaw SM, Eldaghayes I, Kaiser P, Cottingham MG (2005) Fowlpox virus as a recombinant vaccine vector for use in mammals and poultry. (springer.com)
  • Hertig C, Coupar BE, Gould AR, Boyle DB (1997) Field and vaccine strains of fowlpox virus carry integrated sequences from the avian retrovirus, reticuloendotheliosis virus. (springer.com)
  • Swayne DE, Beck JR, Mickle TR (1997) Efficacy of recombinant fowl poxvirus vaccine in protecting chickens against a highly pathogenic Mexican-origin H5N2 avian influenza virus. (springer.com)
  • Despite all the medical treatment success against the virus, an efficacious vaccine is of utmost importance. (eurekalert.org)
  • For this, a vaccine response more rapid than the spread of the virus and one that can stop damage to the cells is sufficient. (eurekalert.org)
  • Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1), which replicates in unicellular Chlorella -like green algae ( 41 , 46 ), and the bacteriophage PRD1 ( 13 ) have a lipid layer beneath the glycoprotein capsid shell. (asm.org)
  • The most successful have been those expressing glycoprotein antigens of enveloped viruses, e.g. avian influenza, Newcastle diseases and West Nile viruses. (springer.com)
  • (asm.org)
  • The major capsid protein (B345) was found to be glycosylated, implying a strong similarity to proteins from other dsDNA viruses. (asm.org)
  • The previously presented structural models in conjunction with the protein, lipid, and carbohydrate information reported here reveal that STIV is strikingly similar to viruses associated with the Bacteria and Eukarya domains of life, further strengthening the hypothesis for a common ancestor of this group of dsDNA viruses from all domains of life. (asm.org)
  • (asm.org)
  • While not common, internal lipid layers are present in a number of dsDNA viruses. (asm.org)
  • They represent therefore ideal targets for immunotherapy, as they contribute to the progression from initial lesions to malignancy and are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated cancers throughout the replicative cycle of the virus. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Co-circulation of influenza A(H5N1) and seasonal influenza viruses among humans and animals could lead to co-infections, reassortment, and emergence of novel viruses with pandemic potential. (vetscite.org)
  • This suggestion is supported by the shared general architecture of this group of viruses and the common fold of their major capsid protein. (asm.org)
  • Reticuloendotheliosis viruses (REVs) are retroviruses that cause a rare disease of gamebirds and waterfowl that includes anemia, immunosuppression, neoplasia, runting, and abnormal feathering. (virology.ws)
  • These viruses circulate in birds, yielding REVs that cause disease, and high antibody levels to REVs in poultry. (virology.ws)
  • Generally CNPV is considered a disease of songbirds, such as canaries, magpies and nightingales, and is associated with higher mortality rates when compared to other avian pox viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the disease progresses blisters get progressively larger and form nodules where the virus can multiply. (wikipedia.org)
  • This disease is caused by a herpes virus and is sometimes called fowl paralysis. (dmoztools.net)
  • In comparison to viruses with eukaryotic and bacterial hosts, little is known about the viruses that infect Archaea . (asm.org)
  • It is not clear when REV DNA inserted into the genomes of these two DNA viruses. (virology.ws)
  • The construction of deletion-knockout poxviruses is a useful approach to determining the function of specific virus genes. (bio-protocol.org)
  • Large eukaryotic DNA viruses, such as poxviruses, phycodnaviruses, phaeoviruses, asfarviruses, iridoviruses (all of which form the recently identified monophyletic clade of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) [ 9 ]), baculoviruses and herpesviruses, also encode a number of transcription factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The shape of all poxviruses resembles something of a 'rounded brick' and remains determined by the specific envelope around the virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we present a detailed characterization of the components forming this unusual virus. (asm.org)
  • In this group, first the fowlpox vector was administered orally, followed by the adenovirus vector as an injection. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the second group that was first treated with the fowlpox vector and afterwards with the adenovirus vector, the likelihood of an infection was reduced by about 70 percent, compared to only a 12 percent reduction in the first group. (eurekalert.org)
  • Provides information on the diseases caused by this group of viruses, their diagnosis and prevention. (dmoztools.net)
  • Duck infectious anemia virus, and the closely related REV spleen necrosis virus (SNV), were both isolated from ducks that were infected with Plasmodium lophurae in 1959. (virology.ws)
  • William Trager in 1959 identified the anemia-inducing agent in stocks of P. lophurae as spleen necrosis virus. (virology.ws)
  • Where this occurred is not known, but one hypothesis is that the Borneo firebacked pheasant in the Bronx Zoo, from which P. lophurae was isolated, had acquired the virus from a mammalian species at the zoo. (virology.ws)
  • Large DNA viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes have complex life cycles with several distinct phases that involve diverse virus-host interactions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, limited information on the diversity and replication of archaeal viruses, in general, has hampered further analysis. (asm.org)
  • Pox viruses are considered some of the most ideal agents for targeted cancer treatment. (asbestos.com)
  • Often, it is through the study of host-virus interactions that insights to the biology of the host are elucidated. (asm.org)
  • According to the WHO, there are currently more than 36 million people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a further 2.4 million become infected every year. (eurekalert.org)
  • Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), isolated from a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, was the first icosahedral virus with an archaeal host to be described. (asm.org)
  • The recent discovery of Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) presents an opportunity to expand our knowledge of virology, study host biology, and investigate the evolutionary relationship of viruses from all three domains of life. (asm.org)