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  • Americium
  • I used radioactive Americium (Am-241), from a smoke detector in the test chamber, to calibrate the low energy peak position, and also the scintillator efficiency at around 40 keV. (sccc.org.au)
  • DTPA has been considered for treatment of radioactive materials such as plutonium, americium, and other actinides. (wikipedia.org)
  • In August, 2004 the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) determined zinc-DTPA and calcium-DTPA to be safe and effective for treatment of those who have breathed in or otherwise been contaminated internally by plutonium, americium, or curium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The recommended treatment is for an initial dose of calcium-DTPA, as this salt of DTPA has been shown to be more effective in the first 24 hours after internal contamination by plutonium, americium, or curium. (wikipedia.org)
  • After that time has elapsed both calcium-DTPA and zinc-DTPA are similarly effective in reducing internal contamination with plutonium, americium or curium, and zinc-DTPA is less likely to deplete the body's normal levels of zinc and other metals essential to health. (wikipedia.org)
  • widespread
  • Subsequent studies examining the deposition of cesium-137 in the white-tailed deer indicated there was not widespread contamination of cesium in the vicinity of Three Mile Island following the Three Mile Island accident. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation protection
  • Defines the criteria for zoning of radioactive contamination and develops proposals for of radiation protection measures for the public, the personnel, and the environment in these areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Provides scientific and expert analysis of draft laws and other regulations in the field of radiation protection and radiation safety of the public, examination of construction plans of nuclear power companies, businesses that use ionizing radiation sources and facilities for radioactive waste management, of programs for use of spent nuclear fuel and ionizing radiation sources and their disposal, takes part in environmental impact assessment of these facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • Data on metal levels in foods and diets have been updated with information gathered from recent international literature. (ebooks.com)
  • As you know, one of the standards used to assess the extent of radioactive releases and longtime human health effects is the levels of cesium 137 (Cs137) released into the environment. (nirs.org)
  • The story was familiar to us, as in March this year, while conducting radiation checks in a park in the suburb of Watari, we came across a newly installed official radiation monitoring post […] as soon as you stepped off the cleaned area the levels of contamination rose sharply, and remained much higher throughout the park - with the exception of around the official monitoring post itself. (enenews.com)
  • Contamination levels within 25 metres of the posts were up to six times higher than at the posts themselves. (enenews.com)
  • In 2014, FDA updated methods of measuring elements in foods to detect and differentiate them at lower levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Upon a FOIA request, the Center for Food Science and Applied Nutrition could not find any records or communications of the coordinator investigating the possible cause of high levels of perchlorate in bologna, collard greens and salami lunchmeat nor receipts to identify brand and lot Total Diet Study US FDA,Page Last Updated: 04/08/2016, accessed 10 Nov 2017 Total Diet Study. (wikipedia.org)
  • A particular problem is encountered with naturally generated radon gas which can affect instruments which are set to detect contamination close to normal background levels and can cause false alarms. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the impact of these increases on the risk to human health from radinuclide contamination of foods is very small (less than 0.05 mSv/y).[citation needed] Other metals Steel industry wastes, which are recycled into fertilizers for their high levels of zinc (essential to plant growth), can include the following toxic metals: lead, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hotspot for this increased toxicity, however was the Malwa region of Punjab, which showed extremely high levels of chemical, biological and radioactive toxicity, including uranium contamination. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathway
  • In this study, Dr. Wing and his colleagues argue that earlier findings had "logical and methodological problems" and conclude that "cancer incidence, specifically lung cancer and leukemia, increased following the TMI accident in areas estimated to have been in the pathway of radioactive plumes than in other areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission defines two emergency planning zones around nuclear power plants: a plume exposure pathway zone with a radius of 10 miles (16 km), concerned primarily with exposure to, and inhalation of, airborne radioactive contamination, and an ingestion pathway zone of about 50 miles (80 km), concerned primarily with ingestion of food and liquid contaminated by radioactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance
  • Depending on the radioactive substance, its content in the medium to be analysed and the nature of the medium, various methods for analysis and measurement are used. (bfs.de)
  • Known agents that have not been identified as causing foodborne illness include microbes, chemicals, or other substance known to be in food. (wikipedia.org)
  • spinach
  • Over the past few years, high-profile outbreaks related to various foods, from spinach and peanut products to eggs, have underscored the need to make continuous improvements in food safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Japanese Industry Minister Banri Kaieda Tuesday apologized to the public, especially fishermen, for causing concern about the process but assured the discharge of the low-level radioactive water posed no major health risk. (upi.com)
  • But before that happens, the utility must ensure there is no more higher radioactive water leaking from the facility. (upi.com)
  • Radioactive water can be cleaned by filtering, but it would be an enormous task to meet the demands of an urban area. (latimes.com)
  • The CRIIRAD has an analysis laboratory, equipped for identification of radioactive contamination (food, water, etc.), which has been delivered the technical qualification certificate by the Health minister. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the region's groundwater and food chain was gradually contaminated by industrial effluents flowing into fresh water sources used both for irrigation and drinking purposes, the region showed a rise in neurological diseases, and a sharp increase in cancer cases and kidney ailments, for example in Muktsar district between 2001 and 2009, 1,074 people died of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • threat
  • The Bioterrorism Act of 2002 granted the FDA administrative detention authority over food items if there is credible evidence or information that indicates the food presents a threat of serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • It enables the FDA to focus more on preventing food safety problems rather than relying primarily on reacting to problems after they occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • biological
  • In the biological sciences, accidental introduction of "foreign" material ('contamination') can seriously distort the results of experiments where small samples are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemicals
  • Contamination may be recognized or not and may become an issue if the impure chemical is mixed with other chemicals or mixtures and causes additional chemical reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • therefore
  • What happens to food and eating is, therefore, an important index of change, a privileged basis for the exploration of historical processes. (routledge.com)
  • 1998
  • The 2003 food-list update used a food list from the USDA's 1994-96, 1998 "Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals" (CSFII) published in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • consumption of food
  • Specific consideration will be given to eating environments and physiological changes that influence access, preparation, and consumption of food by older adults living in the community and in facilities. (uoguelph.ca)
  • This book documents the effects of war on the lives of ordinary people through the investigation of a variety of connections that developed between war-waging and the production, distribution, preparation and consumption of food throughout Asia since the 1930s. (routledge.com)
  • Chemical
  • In the compilation of this cutting-edge new edition, full account has been taken of the significant advances in the ready availability of multi-element analysis, improved sample preparation procedures and a growing interest in the content of chemical species in foods. (ebooks.com)
  • safety
  • The third edition of Metal Contamination of Food is an essential reference book for food industry personnel, including those working in food processing, formation and ingredients, packaging, quality control and food safety. (ebooks.com)
  • Major themes are the nutritional and functional properties of food, nutrient assimilation, food preservation and safety, and the interactions between food processing, diets and health. (uoguelph.ca)
  • But there are no hard and fast rules in the United States, said George H. Pauli, a retired food safety official who spent 29 years at the FDA. (latimes.com)
  • The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 4, 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • This bill is similar to the Food Safety Enhancement Act which passed the House in 2009. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is considered the first major piece of federal legislation addressing food safety since 1938. (wikipedia.org)
  • The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), enables FDA to better protect public health by strengthening the food safety system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under the new law, the FDA will now have new prevention-focused tools and a clear regulatory framework to help make substantial improvements in their approach to food safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first version of the law, the Food Safety Enhancement Act, passed the House on June 9, 2009. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, negotiations with the Senate led to the final product, the 'Food Safety and Modernization Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • practices
  • How eating happens on and off the battlefield and amid wartime and post-war food storages is the focus of this compelling collection of essays, which also addresses the implications of wartime food practices for the outcome of wars, as well as post-war state building, culture, and society. (routledge.com)
  • diets
  • The topics addressed range from issues at stake at the time of the conflicts, such as provisioning the troops and food rationing and food relief for civilians, to long-term, often surprising consequences of war waging and wartime mobilization of resources on the food systems, diets, and tastes of the societies involved. (routledge.com)
  • time
  • An example of reducing radiation doses by reducing the time of exposures might be improving operator training to reduce the time they take to handle a radioactive source. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, for the first time, the FDA has a legislative mandate to require comprehensive, preventive-based controls across the food supply chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Content
  • citation needed] Radioactive elements The radioactive content of the fertilizers varies considerably and depends both on their concentrations in the parent mineral and on the fertilizer production process. (wikipedia.org)
  • products
  • It also controls radioactive contamination of food products. (wikipedia.org)
  • The agency's food tracking system has been programmed to automatically flag all shipments of FDA-regulated products from Japan. (latimes.com)
  • Foods from Japan make up less than 4% of products imported to the United States, and only a fraction of those are dairy products. (latimes.com)
  • The new law also significantly enhances the FDA's ability to achieve greater oversight of the millions of food products coming into the United States from other countries each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Preventive controls include steps that a food facility would take to prevent or significantly minimize the likelihood of problems occurring. (wikipedia.org)
  • environmental
  • The course will review environmental, social, and other factors associated with food insecurity and take critical look at the effectiveness of programs and policies designed to improve food security. (uoguelph.ca)
  • He received the Goldman Environmental Prize in 1992, for his efforts to help people from the Rongelap Atoll, which was subject to nuclear contamination after the test of the Castle Bravo hydrogen bomb in 1954. (wikipedia.org)
  • analysis
  • Since publication of the previous edition of this successful book, there have been many advances in the field of food science and metal analysis and these have been taken into account of in compiling this new edition. (ebooks.com)
  • adults
  • Children are more vulnerable than adults because they are still growing and absorb more contamination, pound for pound, compared with adults. (latimes.com)
  • nutritional
  • This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the Food and Nutritional Sciences from both historical and modern perspectives. (uoguelph.ca)
  • possible
  • To make estimates as realistic as possible, foods are bought from the same places "as consumers do", in each of four regions of the country (North Central, West, South, and Northeast). (wikipedia.org)