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  • probe
  • Advances in probe and microscope technology have led to the rapid development of techniques for fluorescence over the past decade. (microscopyu.com)
  • The hybridization signals for each probe when a nucleic abnormality is detected. (wn.com)
  • However, in situ hybridization requires that many steps be taken with precise optimization for each tissue examined and for each probe used. (wn.com)
  • Using spectrally distinct fluorophore labels for each hybridization probe, this approach gives you the power to resolve several genetic elements or multiple gene expression patterns through multicolor visual display. (thermofisher.com)
  • Probe specificity was improved with a competi-tor oligonucleotide, and fluorescence intensity and cell visualization were enhanced by the design andapplication of two adjacent helpers. (csic.es)
  • Probe performance was tested in soil samples along a pH gradient,and counting results matched the expected in situ distributions. (csic.es)
  • microscopy
  • Over the past 15 years, however, a revolution in light microscopy has occurred through the development of fluorescence techniques that allow unprecedented ease, precision, and accuracy in locating, identifying, and recording data on the genetic makeup of biomedical samples. (microscopyu.com)
  • After washing and signal amplification, the specimen is screened for the reporter molecules by fluorescence microscopy. (microscopyu.com)
  • mRNA
  • In situ hybridization is a powerful technique for identifying specific mRNA species within individual cells in tissue sections, providing insights into physiological processes and disease pathogenesis. (wn.com)