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  • vaccines
  • Science took this point on directly, listing several vaccines that are still produced in WI-38 or MRC-5, rebutting statements in the majority report that fetal cells had "never" been used to produce a polio vaccine, and that "none" of the currently-licensed vaccines in the US are produced using fetal cells. (bioethics.net)
  • The fetal-derived cell lines WI-38 and MRC-5 were adopted by the pharmaceutical industry as tools for the production of vaccines shortly after they were developed in the 1960s.And for a small minority of vaccines, these tools are still used today. (bioethics.net)
  • For example, although vaccines against Hepatitis A are produced using the historic fetal-derived cell line MRC-5, modern vaccines against the related Hepatitis B virus are produced using genetically engineered yeast cells. (bioethics.net)
  • It is currently being used to develop and test vaccines for potential treatment of influenza, dengue fever, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis B and C. It is vital for research in other areas as well. (statnews.com)
  • An uninterrupted supply of aborted baby tissue for experimentation is "absolutely critical" to the development of many new vaccines, Temple added. (ncregister.com)
  • unborn
  • The idea that it would be better to discard fetal tissue than use it to protect unborn babies makes little sense to me. (statnews.com)
  • Earlier this month, the Family Research Council announced Congressman Sensenbrenner received a perfect score during the 114th Congress on its annual Vote Scorecard for Members of Congress who demonstrate an unwavering commitment to the protection of unborn children. (urbanmilwaukee.com)
  • practice
  • The Safe RESEARCH Act would help end this practice and take another important step forward in protecting the lives of our nation's most vulnerable citizens. (urbanmilwaukee.com)
  • bone marrow
  • Bone marrow biopsy and aspiration is the removal of some bone marrow tissue for diagnosis and management of cancers of blood cells and multiple myeloma. (medindia.net)
  • Fetal tissue is used to create a special breed of humanized mice called Hu-BLT, which refers to the bone marrow, liver and thymus tissue harvested from aborted babies, usually between 18- and 22-weeks gestation. (ncregister.com)
  • experimental
  • Given these results, the future prospect is to translate the concept of MFDCs as cells of therapeutic interest into experimental models of tissue regeneration," they concluded. (medindia.net)
  • stem cell
  • No one at HHS has commented on the scope of the investigation, how long it will take, or what the goal may be, but it has caused protests from the American Pediatric Society, the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and even Yale and New York universities. (americanlegalnews.com)
  • The resulting debate hampered stem cell research in the U.S. for nearly a decade, after the George W. Bush Administration prevented federal research money from being used to study excess embryos that couples had donated after IVF. (time.com)
  • These mice have been critical for the development of Truvada, said Temple, whose organization advocating fetal and embryo stem-cell work has received $6 million in federal funding over the past three years. (ncregister.com)
  • federal
  • Federal law was adjusted in 1975 to add language clarifying that this research be "conducted only in accordance with any applicable State or local laws regarding such activities," and only for "the development of important biomedical knowledge which cannot be obtained by other means. (statnews.com)
  • Note: The ISSCR and 64 scientific, medical, and patient organizations wrote in opposition to a U.S. House of Representative's proposal to restrict federal funding for fetal tissue research on 10 September. (isscr.org)
  • acquisition
  • The Scientific Directors (SD), who provide immediate oversight of intramural research in each institute, are aware of the legal requirements governing acquisition and use of fetal tissue. (nih.gov)
  • In the annual Management Controls review , each Scientific Director will be asked to verify that he or she has reviewed the legal requirements regarding fetal tissue acquisition and use for research in their intramural program, and to identify and correct any potential problem areas. (nih.gov)