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  • defects
  • Mutations to SBDS underlie Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), an inherited syndrome featuring bone marrow failure, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, skeletal defects, and an elevated risk for developing hematologic cancers. (bloodjournal.org)
  • erosion
  • In a laboratory setting, electromigration failure is readily imaged with an electron microscope, as interconnect erosion leaves telltale visual markers on the metal layers of the IC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Airflow
  • A compressor surge is a disruption of the airflow through a gas turbine jet engine that can be caused by engine deterioration, a crosswind over the engine's inlet, ingestion of foreign material, or an internal component failure such as a broken blade. (wikipedia.org)
  • equipment
  • Failures related to exposure to high voltage electricity or high intensity microwaves Power-generating equipment, arc welding equipment and powerful magnets (as in medical devices, heavy equipment or motors) can inhibit pulse generators. (wikipedia.org)
  • In document ISO 10303-226, a fault is defined as an abnormal condition or defect at the component, equipment, or sub-system level which may lead to a failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mission critical factor of a system is any factor (component, equipment, personnel, process, procedure, software, etc.) that is essential to business operation or to an organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typical
  • This is because typical industrial environments often involve fluids, temperatures, pressures and flows that could be harmful to the delicate electronic sensor components. (machinerylubrication.com)
  • result
  • Failure or disruption of mission critical factors will result in serious impact on business operations or upon an organization, and even can cause social turmoil and catastrophes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The key difference between a safety critical system and mission critical system, is that safety critical system is a system that, if it fails, may result in serious environmental damage, injury, or loss of life, while mission critical system may result in failure in goal-directed activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Because high temperatures can significantly reduce life span or cause permanent damage to components, and the heat output of components can sometimes exceed the computer's cooling capacity, manufacturers often take additional precautions to ensure that temperatures remain within safe limits. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clause read as follows: "We exclude all liability, loss, damage or expense consequential or otherwise caused to your property, goods, persons or the like, directly or indirectly resulting from our negligence or delay or failure or malfunction of the systems or components provided by HFS for whatever reason. (lexology.com)
  • Multiple paths between any two points on the network allow those points to continue communicating with each other, the packets "routing around" damage, even after any single failure of any one particular path or any one intermediate node. (wikipedia.org)
  • As some interconnects fail before others, the circuit exhibits seemingly random errors, which may be indistinguishable from other failure mechanisms (such as electrostatic discharge damage). (wikipedia.org)
  • By replacing the bad component with that of a different supplier, WD was able to correct the flaw, but not before significant damage to the company's reputation. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, passengers in a jet powered aircraft may become quite alarmed by other engine events such as a compressor surge - a malfunction that is typified by loud bangs and even flames from the engine's inlet and tailpipe. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, unless very carefully designed and using suitable components, switching adapters are more likely to fail than the older type, due in part to complex circuitry and the use of semiconductors. (wikipedia.org)
  • refers
  • Implant failure refers to the failure of any medical implant to meet the claims of its manufacturer or the health care provider which installs it. (wikipedia.org)
  • aircraft
  • Aircraft system safety requires the independence of failure conditions for multiple systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • A turbine engine failure occurs when a turbine engine in an aircraft unexpectedly stops producing thrust or power production due to a malfunction other than fuel exhaustion, although the term "turbine engine failure" can also apply to failure of any turbine engine, such as ground based turbines used in power plants, turbine-engined vessels (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turboprop-powered aircraft and turboshaft-powered helicopters are also powered by turbine engines and are subject to engine failures for many similar reasons as jet-powered aircraft. (wikipedia.org)
  • procedure
  • A turbine-powered aircraft's takeoff procedure is designed around ensuring that an engine failure will not endanger the flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • specification
  • Due to limitations inherent in the Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) specification for driving slots, backplanes are now offered as passive and active. (wikipedia.org)
  • require
  • Many electronic components, including fourth-generation µPs, require forced-air cooling. (edn.com)
  • AC adapters are used with electrical devices that require power but do not contain internal components to derive the required voltage and power from mains power. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Failure of a dental implant is often related to the failure of the implant to osseointegrate correctly with the bone, or vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Components are often designed to generate as little heat as possible, and computers and operating systems may be designed to reduce power consumption and consequent heating according to workload, but more heat may still be produced than can be removed without attention to cooling. (wikipedia.org)