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  • fibers
  • Here, we show that neutrophils generate extracellular fibers, or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are structures composed of granule and nuclear constituents that disarm and kill bacteria extracellularly. (sciencemag.org)
  • Surprisingly, we found that activated neutrophils but not na├»ve cells made prominent extracellular structures (arrows, Fig. 1, B and D ). These fibers, or NETs, were very fragile, and specimens had to be washed and fixed carefully to preserve them. (sciencemag.org)
  • Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are networks of extracellular fibers, primarily composed of DNA from neutrophils, which bind pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • bind
  • They demonstrated first that BMPs bind the extracellular matrix, are present at the apical ectodermal ridge in the developing limb bud, are chemotactic for human monocytes, and have neurotropic potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular
  • The molecular mechanism of bone induction studied by Professor Reddi led to the conceptual advance in tissue engineering that morphogens/metabologens bound to an insoluble extracellular matrix scaffolding act in collaboration to stimulate stem cells to form cartilage and bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathway
  • While the exact process in which a cell will reduce an extracellular acceptor will vary from species to species, methods have been shown to involve the use of an oxidoreductase pathway that will transport electrons to the cell membrane that is exposed to the external environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • This pathway splits off from the ETC pathway after the cytochrome bc1 complex (Complex III) is oxidized by c-type cytochromes designed to move electrons towards the extracellular face of its outermost membrane instead of towards cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV). (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • For example, hormones , growth factors , cytokines and chemokines act by travelling the extracellular space towards biochemical receptors on cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extracellular recording is an electrophysiology technique that uses an electrode inserted into living tissue to measure electrical activity coming from adjacent cells, usually neurons. (nature.com)
  • Cells behave better on Corning Matrigel matrix-the original, trusted extracellular matrix (ECM). (corning.com)
  • Extracellular RNA (also known as exRNA or exosomal RNA) describes RNA species present outside of the cells from which they were transcribed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The extracellular field potential is the electrical potential produced by cells, e.g. nerve or muscle cells, outside of the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • For individual cells, the time course of the extracellular potential theoretically is inversely proportional to the transmembrane current. (wikipedia.org)
  • organic matter
  • Heterotrophic nutrition means that fungi utilize extracellular sources of organic energy, organic material or organic matter, for their maintenance, growth and reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Extracellular digestion is a form of digestion found in all saprobiontic annelids, crustaceans, arthropods, lichens and chordates, including vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrients
  • Extracellular enzyme production supplements the direct uptake of nutrients by microorganisms and is linked to nutrient availability and environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often
  • In these experiments the extracellular field potential will be detected as an electrical potential whose source and composition is often ambiguous, making its interpretation difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • Similar to the term "non-coding RNA", "extracellular RNA" defines a group of several types of RNAs whose functions are diverse, yet they share a common attribute which, in the case of exRNAs, is existence in an extracellular environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The term, "extracellular signal-regulated kinases", is sometimes used as a synonym for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but has more recently been adopted for a specific subset of the mammalian MAPK family. (wikipedia.org)