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  • fetus
  • The particular sensitivity of the fetus to radiation exposure, and the ability of radioisotopes to attach to cells, tissues, and DNA raise the question of whether fetuses/newborns with birth defects with the greater exposures suffered elevated harm during the period after the meltdown. (scirp.org)
  • On the same day, June 28, 2007, The Times also published an article concerning exposure to secondhand smoke for pregnant women and the alleged risks that such exposure creates for a developing a fetus. (forces.org)
  • utero
  • Tobacco smoke exposure in utero causes long-lasting neurocognitive, behavioral, and respiratory harms. (aappublications.org)
  • Although fetal responses to such exposures may impart an enhanced capacity to cope with the immediate stressor, such in utero 'developmental programming' can contribute a significant risk for a number of important adult diseases. (frontiersin.org)
  • Disruption of Rat Testis Development Following Combined In Utero Exposure to the Phytoestrogen Genistein and Anti-Androgenic Plasticizer Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate. (pops-edc.ru)
  • absorption
  • To determine the effects that the timing, amount, and subsequent absorption of toxins and nutrients have on ASD, Mount Sinai researchers used validated tooth-matrix biomarkers to analyze baby teeth collected from pairs of identical and non-identical twins, of which at least one had a diagnosis of ASD. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • significantly
  • Since the late 1970s a number of commercial products have become ubiquitous, which provide human exposures to levels of RF radiation that are significantly higher than either of the previous or present background levels. (elettrosensibili.it)
  • Free radicals appeared to be a cause of this damage - as animals exposed to aspartame had significantly reduced anti-oxidants (protection from free radical damage) which included lower levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide disumutase activity, catalase activity. (chem-tox.com)
  • periods
  • We found significant divergences in metal uptake between ASD-affected children and their healthy siblings, but only during discrete developmental periods," said Manish Arora, PhD, BDS, MPH, Director of Exposure Biology at the Senator Frank Lautenberg Environmental Health Sciences Laboratory at Mount Sinai and Vice Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • These toxins break down slowly and build up in our fatty tissues where they remain in the body for long periods of time. (mercola.com)
  • risk
  • But those guidelines don't cover the risk of cancer, and they are "not intended to define clean up or action levels for ATSDR or other Agencies," according to ATSDR's website . (insideclimatenews.org)
  • 4 Tobacco-related carcinogens measured in house dust samples of smokers are at levels sufficient to increase cancer risk, 5 and young children may have greater exposure. (aappublications.org)
  • The National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), funded a $25 million study on the cancer risk of lab animals from wireless exposures. (latitudes.org)
  • Specifically, for each tenfold increase in prenatal pesticide metabolite levels, there was a fivefold greater risk of a child scoring high on the evaluation, suggesting a higher likelihood that the child had ADHD. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Adding yet another alleged risk of exposure to ETS, now for unborn children, tends to increase sales of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for use in "Smoke Free" environments advocated by tobacco control advocates who are directly funded by pharmaceutical special-interests. (forces.org)
  • fetuses
  • Children and fetuses are more vulnerable to environmental exposures than adults because their systems are still developing, which makes them less able than adults to metabolize, detoxify, and excrete toxins. (epa.gov)
  • environment
  • It is in this environment of low-level RF radiation that life on earth developed and exists to this day. (elettrosensibili.it)
  • The Third European Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, held in London in 1999, emphasized the importance of protecting children from undesirable environmental exposures in stating: "We recognize the special vulnerability of children and commit to develop policies and actions to achieve a safe environment in which children can develop to their highest attainable level of health. (aacrjournals.org)
  • radiation
  • Prior to the twentieth century the only sources of radiofrequency (RF) radiation were the hyper-low levels of RF energy originating from our sun and the even lower levels of extra-solar RF noise. (elettrosensibili.it)
  • However, over the span of decades the number of terrestrial RF radiation sources, now counted in the billions, has increased to the degree that, presently, the base radiation level is many thousands of times higher than from solar RF energy impinging on the earth. (elettrosensibili.it)
  • Notwithstanding the proliferation of RF radiation sources during the early decades of the "radiofrequency age", the 1940s through the 1970s, humans were seldom exposed to RF radiation at levels that might cause concern. (elettrosensibili.it)
  • But what we have today, regardless of how low intensity it is meant to be, is exposure to billions of times more radiation than our parents experienced when they were born. (latitudes.org)
  • The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is in charge of setting human exposure limits for radiofrequency (RF) radiation, the main carrier of the wireless signal. (latitudes.org)
  • harm
  • While these five anomalies are relatively uncommon (about 7500 cases per year in the U.S.), sometimes making statistical significance difficult to achieve, the consistency of the results lend strength to the analysis, and suggest fetal harm from Fukushima may have occurred in western U.S. states. (scirp.org)
  • behavioral
  • Dr. Bruce Lanphear MD, MPH, has studied children's environmental health for nearly two decades and is currently principal investigator for the HOME Study, a 400-person birth cohort study, designed to examine the impact of low-level exposures to toxins on learning and behavioral problems in children. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • Dr. Lanphear also designs experimental trials to test the efficacy of reducing children's exposures to environmental hazards on asthma symptoms and behavioral problems. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • In addition, careful examination of the University of Washington study data reveals that the calculations to establish an alleged strong association between ETS exposure and later behavioral problems for children are based on a numeric value assigned by the authors, to apparently quantify the amount of nicotine allegedly ingested. (forces.org)
  • consequences
  • However, the apparent scientific corollary to this position is that children are particularly or even uniquely vulnerable to environmental health hazards, i.e ., that the consequences of exposure in children are more severe than the consequences in adults. (aacrjournals.org)
  • birth
  • Furthermore, metal levels at three months after birth were shown to be predictive of the severity of ASD eight to ten years later in life. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • Experimentally, prenatal exposure to stress or excess glucocorticoids in a variety of animal models can malprogram offspring physiology, resulting in a reduction in birth weight and subsequently increasing the likelihood of disorders of cardiovascular function, glucose homeostasis, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and anxiety-related behaviours in adulthood. (frontiersin.org)
  • In one study of the blood of 300 newborns, the higher the infants' level of exposure to PFOA, the lower their birth weight and head size . (mercola.com)
  • limits
  • Indeed, OSHA itself says that many of its exposure limits for dangerous substances don't offer sufficient protection for workers. (slate.com)