Loading...
  • Acute
  • Acute effects appear immediately after exposure to high levels of a toxic substance and may be treatable. (levitt-safety.com)
  • In fact, published studies have shown that workplace exposures to hazardous drugs can cause both acute and chronic health effects such as skin rashes, adverse reproductive outcomes (including infertility, spontaneous abortions, and congenital malformations), and possibly leukemia and other cancers. (cdc.gov)
  • Here are the following features: Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia cerebellar hypoplasia microcephaly mental retardation ataxia dysmorphic features: small face, thick ears deep set eyes, right eye epicanthal fold, slightly small jaw narrow palate neurosensorial hearing loss The mother worked in an ink factory involving many chemicals and had acute and chronic exposures. (bio.net)
  • 2016
  • The average lifetime costs derived from childhood IPV exposure are estimated to be over $50,000 per victim (2016 U.S. dollars) due to increased healthcare costs ($11,000), increased crime costs ($14,000), and productivity losses ($26,000). (springer.com)
  • Centers
  • NPDS is a near real-time, comprehensive poisoning surveillance system that collects data on calls regarding poison exposure placed to any of the U.S. poison centers. (cdc.gov)
  • Calls to poison centers come from health-care professionals or persons voluntarily reporting a poison exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Chemical
  • Chemical, thermal, and biological ocular exposures. (springer.com)
  • The Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) play distinct roles in dealing with chemical and biological (CB) exposures and are responsible for developing DoD deployment occupational and environmental health surveillance, risk assessment and risk management policies. (health.mil)
  • The permissible exposure limit ( PEL or OSHA PEL ) is a legal limit in the United States for exposure of an employee to a chemical substance or physical agent such as high level noise. (wikipedia.org)
  • What seem to be the main focus in chemical exposure involves Toluene and many types of Glycol s. (bio.net)
  • As emphasized in a report by the National Academy of Science, 'Animals as Sentinels of Environmental Health Hazards,' systematic evaluation of chemical exposure-related diseases of companion animals could lead to identification of unsuspected chemical hazards to vulnerable human populations that might otherwise go unnoticed (National Research Council 1991). (ewg.org)
  • EWG reviewed veterinary research literature published over the past three decades, and identified numerous studies documenting illnesses linked to chemical exposures in companion animals. (ewg.org)
  • While this study did not identify specific chemical exposures that lead to bladder cancer in dogs, pet dogs living in chemically polluted area were found to have high levels serum levels of toxic chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Schilling 1988). (ewg.org)
  • carcinogens
  • In a study of 8,760 pet dogs at 13 veterinary teaching hospitals, a significant positive correlation was seen between the morbidity ratios for canine bladder cancer and the overall level of industrial activity in the host county of the hospital, suggesting environmental exposure to carcinogens (Hayes 1981). (ewg.org)
  • shutter speed
  • Fast shutter speed (short exposure time) of a breaking wave. (wikipedia.org)
  • In photography , exposure value ( EV ) is a number that represents a combination of a camera 's shutter speed and f-number , such that all combinations that yield the same exposure have the same EV (for any fixed scene luminance ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Its intent was to simplify choosing among equivalent camera exposure settings by replacing combinations of shutter speed and f -number (e.g., 1/125 s at f /16) with a single number (e.g., 15). (wikipedia.org)
  • The f-number (relative aperture ) determines the depth of field , and the shutter speed ( exposure time ) determines the amount of motion blur , as illustrated by the two images at the right (and at long exposure times, as a second-order effect, the light-sensitive medium may exhibit reciprocity failure , which is a change of light sensitivity dependent on the irradiance at the film). (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • The greater the market exposure, the greater the market risk in that specific investment area. (investopedia.com)
  • For example, a portfolio with both stock and bond holdings that includes market exposure to both types of assets typically has less risk than a portfolio with exposure only to stocks. (investopedia.com)
  • In addition to the health care worker involved becoming ill because of the exposure, the worker may become a potential health risk to patients in the future, and this may need to be addressed. (medscape.com)
  • Surgical Procedure Characteristics and Risk of Sharps-Related Blood and Body Fluid Exposure. (medscape.com)
  • To describe more completely the national burden of CO exposure and risk factors associated with vulnerable populations, CDC used data from the National Poison Data System (NPDS) to characterize reported unintentional, non--fire-related CO exposures, including those that were managed at the site of exposure and were not treated at a health-care facility. (cdc.gov)
  • Surveillance and analysis of data from NPDS and secondary sources might provide a more comprehensive description of the burden of CO exposure in the United States and assist in the development of interventions better targeted to high-risk populations. (cdc.gov)
  • Give PEP for exposures posing risk of infection transmission. (cdc.gov)
  • The health risk depends on how much exposure a worker has to these drugs and how toxic they are. (cdc.gov)
  • worker
  • worker exposure levels may exceed 3 times the PEL-TWA for no more than a total of 30 minutes during a workday, and under no circumstances should they exceed 5 times the PEL-TWA, provided that the PEL-TWA is not exceeded. (wikipedia.org)
  • proportion
  • Compared with all exposures reported to NPDS, the proportion of reported CO exposures steadily declined, from 0.31% in 2006 to 0.24% in 2009. (cdc.gov)
  • A greater proportion of CO exposures managed on-site occurred in the Northeast (35.5%) ( Table 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • phobias
  • Exposure therapy is the most successful known treatment for phobias. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agoraphobia and social anxiety disorder are examples of phobias that have been successfully treated by exposure therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • From its early uses in treating phobias, exposure methods have expanded greatly, being established now as state of the art and first-line interventions for all anxiety and many other mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress, obsessive-compulsive, somatoform and addictive disorders. (springer.com)
  • descriptive
  • The 1964 ASA standard for automatic exposure controls for cameras, ASA PH2.15-1964 , took the same approach, and also used the more descriptive term camera exposure settings . (wikipedia.org)
  • The data were then stratified according to management site (i.e., health-care facility or site of exposure) and a descriptive analysis was conducted. (cdc.gov)
  • pathology
  • Some of the body's 'memories' of early fluoride exposure may become translated into pathology and thereby determine disease in later life,' they write. (prnewswire.com)
  • commonly
  • Exposure value is also used to indicate an interval on the photographic exposure scale, with a difference of 1 EV corresponding to a standard power-of-2 exposure step, commonly referred to as a stop . (wikipedia.org)
  • Each increment of 1 in exposure value corresponds to a change of one "step" (or, more commonly, one "stop") in exposure, i.e., half as much exposure, either by halving the exposure time or halving the aperture area, or a combination of such changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyanoacrylate (super glue), commonly seen as a result of home and iatrogenic exposure, is also discussed. (springer.com)
  • therapist
  • The exposure therapist identifies the cognitions, emotions and physiological arousal that accompany a fear-inducing stimulus and then tries to break the pattern of escape that maintains the fear. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Studies done with pregnant rodents have found that prenatal MA exposure results in altered neural circuitry, both structurally and functionally. (wikipedia.org)
  • health care
  • Within the investor's 80% market exposure to stocks, there might be a 30% market exposure to the health care sector, 25% exposure to the technology sector , 20% to the financial services sector, 15% to the defense sector and 10% to the energy sector . (investopedia.com)
  • The portfolio's returns are more influenced by health care stocks than by energy stocks because of the greater market exposure to the former. (investopedia.com)
  • National estimates of CO exposures have been based on secondary data sources, such as hospital administrative records, and are limited to exposures treated within the health-care system. (cdc.gov)
  • Although symptoms varied slightly between persons managed on-site and those treated at a health-care facility, most CO exposures occurred at home and most often involved females, children aged ≤17 years, and adults aged 18--44 years. (cdc.gov)
  • The number of persons with reported CO exposures who were transported to a health-care facility ranged from 11.1 to 14.3 per million each year and the number of persons with reported CO exposures who were managed on-site ranged from 8.6 to 14.0 per million each year ( Figure ). (cdc.gov)
  • aperture
  • On some lenses with leaf shutters , the process was further simplified by allowing the shutter and aperture controls to be linked such that, when one was changed, the other was automatically adjusted to maintain the same exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • Exposure therapy involves exposing the target patient to the anxiety source or its context without the intention to cause any danger. (wikipedia.org)
  • describe
  • The aims of the survey were used to describe patterns of exposure to vibration in conjunction with patters of vibration control provisions with respect to industry, occupation and other relevant demographic and employment variables. (safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
  • indicates
  • The decrease in shivering activity combined with an increase in EE, following the ingestion of EGCG and caffeine during the cold exposure, indicates that NST pathways can be significantly stimulated in adult human subjects. (cambridge.org)
  • adult
  • van Tongeren M, Mee T, Whatmough P, Broad L, Maslanyj M, Allen S. Assessing occupational and domestic ELF magnetic field exposure in the uk adult brain tumour study: results of a feasibility study. (medscape.com)
  • If the root of adult disease is already seeded by the exposures of fluoride during this period, one can even argue that fetal, newborn and childhood nutritional environment is as important as adult dietary habit and lifestyle,' they write. (prnewswire.com)
  • burden
  • While much research has been conducted on the effect of IPV exposure on multiple short- and long-term outcomes, no research to date has examined the economic burden associated with IPV exposure. (springer.com)
  • Effects
  • The effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and caffeine on non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) during cold exposure is unknown. (cambridge.org)
  • The purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of co-ingesting EGCG and caffeine on the thermogenic responses of a 3 h cold exposure. (cambridge.org)
  • Though in recent years conducted by Pedro Melo, Vincente Zanon Moreno, Sheila Pons Vazquez, Maria Dolores Pinazo-Duran, Maria Amelia Tavares for the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Porto, Portugal researched rats who were exposed to MA use and its effects on the optic nerve myelination after prenatal exposure to this psycho-stimulant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effects of exposure and development on normal contrast, silver-image monochrome film. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • males
  • Total reported CO exposures included 34,356 females (23.0 per million) and 30,257 males (20.9 per million). (cdc.gov)
  • intensity
  • Results showed that the AUC of shivering intensity over the cold exposure period was reduced by approximately 20 % in the Green tea (266 ( sem 6) % maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) × min) compared with the Placebo (332 ( sem 69) %MVC × min) ( P = 0·01) treatments. (cambridge.org)
  • chemicals
  • As a result of these multiple exposures, pet cats have 23 times higher levels of brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs) in their serum compared to humans, while dogs are contaminated with perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) at levels 2.4 times higher than typical amounts found in people. (ewg.org)
  • injury
  • CO is an odorless, colorless gas that usually remains undetectable until exposure results in injury or death. (cdc.gov)
  • type of exposure (i.e., percutaneous injury, mucous membrane or nonintact skin exposure, and bites resulting in blood exposure). (cdc.gov)
  • This page has information about what to do, where to go, and how to ensure timely payment for services after exposure to a blood-borne pathogen or a needlestick/sharps injury. (washington.edu)
  • In most cases, Health Sciences students who have already satisfied their initial program requirements by proving their immunity to Hepatitis B do not need to have these labs drawn after a bloodborne pathogen exposure or needlestick/sharps injury. (washington.edu)
  • Disease
  • For children and young adults, early-life exposure to fluoride could become the root of the development of neurodegenerative disease [e.g. autism] in later life,' they write. (prnewswire.com)
  • treatment
  • ERP or EX/RP) is a variant of exposure therapy that is recommended by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), the American Psychiatric Association (APA), and the Mayo Clinic as first-line treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) citing that it has the richest empirical support for both youth and adolescent outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mainstay of treatment for the majority of these exposures is rapid recognition and initiation of irrigation. (springer.com)
  • However, there are several key features unique to each exposure type that must be considered for complete evaluation and treatment. (springer.com)
  • Atley K, Ridyard E. Treatment of hydrofluoric acid exposure to the eye. (springer.com)
  • The division also provides the names of these individuals along with their exposure information to the VA. The VA then notifies individuals of their potential exposure, provides treatment, if necessary, for these individuals and adjudicates any claim for compensation. (health.mil)
  • markets
  • The exposure of a portfolio to particular securities/markets/sectors must be considered when determining a portfolio's asset allocation since it can greatly increase returns and/or minimize losses. (investopedia.com)
  • known
  • it was generally known as the Exposure Value System (EVS) when the features became available on cameras in the United States ( Desfor 1957 ). (wikipedia.org)
  • This book is a comprehensive illustrated surgical guide to operative exposures of the spinal nerves, also known as peripheral nerves. (springer.com)
  • Development
  • STAE helps to build communities, promote communities development, enhance exposure and connects volunteers/interns, organizations and communities. (idealist.org)