Loading...
  • high functi
  • The normative sample included children with developmental and acquired neurological disorders (reading disorder, ADHD subtypes, traumatic brain injury, Tourettes disorder, mental retardation, localized brain lesions, and high functioning autism). (academictherapy.com)
  • impairment in executive
  • EF has received extensive attention in the autism literature for many years largely due to the influential proposal that the inherent rigidity and invariance of autistic behaviors could be explained by a primary impairment in executive control [ 7 , 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • lifespan
  • Given the increasingly sedentary disposition of Western society (World Health Organization, 2012a , 2012b ) and the rapidly aging population (United Nations Population Division, 2009 ), it is in the interests of health providers and the public that the links between exercise and executive functioning across the lifespan be thoroughly examined. (springer.com)
  • intervention
  • Several chapters are devoted to practical aspects of executive dysfunction, including research-based treatment strategies, educational implications, forensic cautions and intervention resources. (ovid.com)
  • The present study examined potential changes in executive function performance associated with participation in the Social Competence Intervention (SCI) program, a short-term intervention designed to improve social competence in adolescents with ASD. (hindawi.com)
  • Autism
  • Cross-sectional group comparisons revealed little evidence for an executive deficit in children with autism at either age. (bl.uk)
  • 2017
  • January 13, 2019 from 6:00-8:00 pm at North Park Elementary School (2017 W. Montrose Ave., Chicago, IL 60618) Executive function skills are the core set of cognitive skills required for planning, completing and evaluating the completion of tasks, as well as overseeing our communication exchanges. (google.com)
  • developmental
  • In light of the developmental time course of executive functions, we consider separately children, young adults, and older adults. (springer.com)
  • Despite the consensus in the developmental literature regarding the role of executive function (EF) skills in supporting the development of language skills during the preschool years, we know relatively little about the associations between these EF skills, their components, and language skills among preschool- aged children. (scirp.org)
  • working memory
  • Encouraging results from the adaptive training of specific executive capacities such as working memory merit further investigation. (medscape.com)
  • In young adults, working memory updating is the main executive function shown to benefit from regular exercise, but cross-sectional data further suggest that task-switching and posterror performance may also benefit. (springer.com)
  • The term 'executive function' refers to several cognitive skills including inhibitor)'control, generation of novel responses, working memory and planning. (bl.uk)
  • Stroop
  • Scatter plots demonstrate the relationship between the percentage of correct AS responses and tests of executive function: modified trails (A) , design fluency (B) and the Stroop task (C) . Circles indicate subjects with low education (unfilled) and high education (filled). (nih.gov)
  • neurocognitive
  • Moderate physical activity improved odds of lower neurocognitive impairment, particularly as measured by executive function, in a study of 80 older HIV-positive people by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) . (natap.org)
  • skill
  • Join NPES for the opportunity to hear Sarah Ward, renowned expert in executive function skill support, share immediately applicable strategies that will leave you energized for the second semester of school and beyond. (google.com)
  • control
  • A latent variable approach to executive control in healthy ageing. (novapublishers.com)
  • Using a case-control design, executive functioning, orienting, and cortical thickness was assessed in 21 white-collar criminals matched with 21 controls on age, gender, ethnicity, and general level of criminal offending. (nih.gov)