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  • protein
  • In another essay, Hughes writes: "Purifying selection is the norm in the evolution of protein coding genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through various experiments Kimura was able to determine that proteins in mammalian lineages were polymorphisms of each other, having only one or two point mutations that did not affect the actions of the protein in any way, whereas in Darwinian evolution a slow pattern of selection in genetic lineages with increasing fitness through generations is expected. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, molecular evolutionists found that rates of protein evolution were fairly independent of generation time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chaperones, also called molecular chaperones, are proteins that assist other proteins in assuming their three-dimensional fold, which is necessary for protein function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chaperones also affect the evolution of proteins in general, as many proteins fundamentally require chaperones to fold or are naturally prone to misfolding, and therefore mitigates protein aggregation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since chaperones are mediators of this transition by assisting in the fold of the client protein, chaperone activity is thought to modulate the adaptive evolution of the proteome. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • In the evolution of modern species, there have been millions of molecular changes. (blackwellpublishing.com)
  • Dan Howard - New Mexico State University Rapid evolution of barriers to fertilization in insects: parallels to marine species. (bio.net)
  • With the availability of genomic data from multiple related species, molecular evolution has become one of the most active and fastest growing fields of study in genomics and bioinformatics. (springer.com)
  • Studies performed using computational, chemical, in vitro, and experimental evolutionary methods, and those that target species-independent phenomena such as ribosomal function, genetic code evolution, and regulatory processes will occupy more of the journal space than before, with the consequence that work that is organism-, lineage-, or gene-specific will require a broader impact to be considered for publication. (wikipedia.org)
  • methodology
  • It also explains the methodology involved in dealing with molecular data. (worldcat.org)
  • Applicants from labs with a strong focus on computational molecular evolution methodology need to carefully outline their motivation for attending the course in this context, since they have ready access to expert supervision and are likely to be very skilled already in the topics we teach, or are in the course of becoming very skilled therein. (embo.org)
  • mutations
  • The near‚Äźneutrality concept may be extended to the evolution of such systems, where epigenetics and robustness are important for gene expression and many mutations are weakly selected. (els.net)
  • Mutations occur at random and in the Darwinian evolution model natural selection acts on the genetic variation in a population that has arisen through this mutation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approaches
  • Dear Colleague, We are organizing a Keystone Symposium entitled, 'Molecular Approaches to Marine Ecology and Evolution. (bio.net)
  • For more information about the meeting contact either: Howard Lasker email - biolask at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu or Mary Alice Coffroth email - v226uhbq at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu Dept. of Biological Sciences SUNY at Buffalo Buffalo, NY 14260 (716) 645-2881 (716) 645-2975 FAX *********************************************************************** MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO MARINE ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION INTRODUCTION Howard R. Lasker - SUNY at Buffalo Introductory remarks -structure of the problem and the symposium. (bio.net)
  • Beginning in the 1950s, a few naturalists also experimented with molecular approaches-notably Ernst Mayr and Charles Sibley. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequences
  • What we observe as evolution consists of shuffling round within this limited set of equivalent sequences. (blackwellpublishing.com)
  • Using the mutation rate per generation and the number of nucleotide differences between two sequences, divergence times can be estimated effectively via the molecular clock. (wikipedia.org)
  • A high sequence identity means that it is highly likely that these two sequences diverged from a common ancestral sequence (are homologous), and highly unlikely that these two sequences have evolved independently (see Convergent evolution). (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • THE ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION OF FERTILIZATION - John Pearse - University of California-Santa Cruz Patterns of spawning and fertilization among marine invertebrates. (bio.net)
  • mutation
  • In addition, it is theorized that certain chemical reactions may have taken place on early Earth, before true evolution began, and some of these reactions may have helped to form these informational molecules that enabled replication and mutation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Roles of mutation and selection in molecular evolution. (worldcat.org)