Loading...
  • Latin American
  • In The Disappearing Mestizo , Joanne Rappaport weaves a skilful ethnography across the everyday experiences of Latin American men and women who were at various times, classified as mestizos , to ultimately break apart the underlying category and lay bare the local contingencies that shaped it. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In many Latin American nations it is obviously not the case that mestizos make common cause with indigenous people against white elites as "people of color. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Many Hispanic families in New Mexico have long known that they had indigenous ancestry, even though some here still call themselves "Spanish" to emphasize their Iberian ties and to differentiate themselves from the state's 23 federally recognized tribes, as well as from Mexican and other Latin American immigrants. (nytimes.com)
  • lineages
  • I don't know if this type of visual representation is even possible: there are peoples like native Americans, or Bantu farmers where a single haplogroup dominates decisively, but most human groups show a mix of a variety of lineages at different frequencies. (blogspot.com)
  • genetic
  • Their genetic profile is rather like many non-Brahmin South Indians, except the Nair, who have a peculiar attested history with the Brahmins of their region. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Interestingly when the new genetic studies confirming Indian ancestry came on the scene I was "corrected" several times by Indians themselves when reporting this part of the Coloured heritage. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Thus terms as "Negro", "white", "Indian", or "mulatto" do not have any genetic meanings in most of the American societies - in one society they may be classifications based on real or imaginary physical characteristics, in another they may refer more to criteria of social status such as education, wealth, language and custom, or in yet another society they may indicate near or distant ancestry. (vacilando.org)
  • Sanitary Bureau
  • Washington, D.C.: Pan American Health Organization, Pan American Sanitary Bureau, Regional Office of the World Health Organization, 2002. (nationsencyclopedia.com)
  • To test penicillin's effectiveness in treating syphilis and other STDs, researchers led by Dr. John Charles Cutler from the United States (funded by the Public Health Services, the Pan American Health Sanitary Bureau, and the National Institutes of Health) headed to Guatemala in 1946 and found prostitutes who had syphilis, getting them to then give it to unsuspecting Guatemalan soldiers, mental health patients, and prisoners. (todayifoundout.com)
  • 2002
  • According to the German monograph Minderheitenrechte in Europa co-edited by Pan and Pfeil (2002) there are 87 distinct peoples of Europe , of which 33 form the majority population in at least one sovereign state, while the remaining 54 constitute ethnic minorities . (wikipedia.org)
  • continent
  • Precisely how many Indians inhabited the American continent before 1492 will never be known with any certainty. (vacilando.org)
  • The Book of Mormon claims to be an ancient record containing a summary of a now-disappeared civilization that once lived in the American continent but originated in the Middle East. (bmaf.org)
  • They believe it to be an historical record originally engraved on golden plates, covering a period of [Page approximately 1,000 years (600 bc to ad 400) and dealing with ancient people who lived in the American continent hundreds of years before the arrival of the Europeans. (bmaf.org)
  • axis
  • Moreover, the prediction of a South-North axis was confirmed by registry data showing that the prevalence of IgAN-attributable kidney failure is increased in Northern Europe, similar to multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. (prolekare.cz)
  • Mestizos
  • Brian suggests that native elites, like Alva Ixtlilxochitl, worked in collaboration with other elite mestizos , like don Constantino Bravo Huitzimengari, as well as, interviewed many eider indians so as to gather "original histories. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ethnography
  • In the context of European ethnography in particular, the terms ethnic group , people , nationality and ethno-linguistic group , are used as mostly synonymous, although preference may vary in usage with respect to the situation specific to the individual countries of Europe . (wikipedia.org)
  • tribes
  • In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the prevailing theory was that the Lumbees were the descendants of the coastal Algonkian tribes of North Carolina and the English colony that mysteriously disappeared from Roanoke Island in 1587. (encyclopedia.com)
  • What I hope this book will do is give an overview of the possible tribes Melungeons descend from, show some of the ethnic mixing that happened, and relate family stories and traditions about Indian heritage. (multiracial.com)
  • slaves
  • Some theories purport that the Melungeons were part of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony, the Ottoman Turks, Native Americans, Portuguese, escaped slaves, Juan Pardo's or Hernando de Soto's expeditions, and the list goes on. (melungeon.org)
  • No doubt it was far more likely that the usual lot of the descendants of Indian slaves during the Dutch era would be to be absorbed into the melange of the Coloured population than assimilated into what later became the Afrikaners. (discovermagazine.com)
  • St. Thomas the Apostle Church in Abiquiú, N.M., a village settled by former Indian slaves, or Genízaros, in the 18th century. (nytimes.com)
  • Their captive forebears were Native Americans - slaves frequently known as Genízaros (pronounced heh-NEE-sah-ros) who were sold to Hispanic families when the region was under Spanish control from the 16th to 19th centuries. (nytimes.com)
  • Many Indian slaves remained in bondage when Mexico and later the United States governed New Mexico. (nytimes.com)
  • Seeking to strengthen the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in 1865, Congress passed the Peonage Act of 1867 after learning of propertied New Mexicans owning hundreds and perhaps thousands of Indian slaves, mainly Navajo women and children. (nytimes.com)
  • African-American
  • Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 â October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist and seamstress whom the U.S. Congress dubbed the Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement. (statemaster.com)
  • demographic
  • Obviously, this is not the explanation for the divergence between North and South Korea, but Wade argues that it does explain why Western Europe and its demographic offshoots have developed institutions conducive to economic growth and democracy while other regions have not. (econlib.org)
  • We found that inferences of demographic history restricted to neutrally evolving genomic regions allowed a simple one-pulse model to be robustly rejected, suggesting that differences in selection cannot explain the differences in Neandertal ancestry. (blogspot.com)
  • mainly
  • Located mainly in southeastern North Carolina along the Lumber River, the Lumbees have lived among the river swamps for almost three centuries. (encyclopedia.com)
  • white
  • Should white americans recognize/embrace their African ancestry? (city-data.com)
  • Most white Americans embrace the nationality of their more recent relatives - Irish, Italian, etc. (city-data.com)
  • about a Louisiana woman whose ancestry was one-sixteenth (6.25 percent) 'black,' but who regarded herself as 'white' and had been raised in, and accepted by, the white community. (racialcompact.com)
  • Assuming, for the sake of argument, that the 'average' white person in the United States had five percent black genes (more on this assumption later) only a few would actually be the exact 'average' of five percent or one-twentieth black ancestry. (racialcompact.com)
  • whose
  • Not surprisingly, the U.S., whose completely evil and inhuman profit-driven health care system - controlled by equally inhuman monsters who would gleefully devour their own children if it would raise their corporatations' stock price by even two percent even as they murder 45,000 Americans every year - has been the major source of these profits. (levinlaw.com)
  • History
  • That was not the case for the United States of America for most of its history. (discovermagazine.com)
  • We're discovering things that complicate the hell out of our history, demanding that we reject the myths we've been taught," said Gregorio Gonzáles, 29, an anthropologist and self-described Genízaro who writes about the legacies of Indian enslavement . (nytimes.com)
  • Paleolithic
  • It is believed to have first appeared in the Horn of Africa approximately 26,000 years ago and dispersed to North Africa and the Near East during the late Paleolithic and Mesolithic periods. (city-data.com)
  • tribe
  • Numbering over 54,000 enrolled members, the Lumbees are the largest Indian tribe east of the Mississippi River. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Many claimed to be Cherokee, or simply said they were Indian, without a definite tribe. (multiracial.com)
  • terms
  • These in turn led to Western Europe holding the advantage in terms of guns, germs, and steel, which is hardly edifying from a moral perspective. (econlib.org)
  • several
  • Several factors contributed to this: first, Europeans had been the caretakers of domestic animals for thousands of years, and had over time grown (somewhat) immune to the common diseases that accompanied the domestication of such food sources. (todayifoundout.com)