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  • Contraception
  • Eugenics takes three forms in California: limiting the number of children for whom a woman on welfare can get state support, coercing drug-addicted women to surrender reproductive capacities and forcing contraception use a term of probation. (wikipedia.org)
  • movement
  • This continued until World War II, after which the number of sterilizations began to decrease, largely due to the fallout of Hitler's eugenics movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • education
  • citation needed] David Starr Jordan: Founding president of Stanford University and chairman of the American Eugenics Commission, vice-president of the American Society for Social Hygiene, and vice-president of the Eugenics Education Society of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • proponents
  • Invariably, proponents of eugenics saw their own class and race as most deserving of propagation. (faqs.org)
  • Proponents of eugenics carried out elaborate research programs to determine the type of inheritance these traits exhibited (dominant, recessive, incompletely dominant, sex-linked, etc. (sciencemag.org)
  • The author, Richard Conniff, takes note of Fisher's prodigious professional accomplishments and his private decency in order to foreground the real subject of his article: the economist's role as one of his era's highest-wattage proponents of eugenics. (patheos.com)
  • 1996
  • Since the 1980s and 1990s, when new assisted reproductive technology procedures became available such as gestational surrogacy (available since 1985), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (available since 1989), and cytoplasmic transfer (first performed in 1996), fear has emerged about a possible revival of eugenics. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996) Eugenics and the Welfare State: Sterilization Policy in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland. (els.net)
  • It is regrettable that the victims of forced sterilization under the eugenics policy are denied judiciary relief after being left unattended for decades - and more than 20 years after the eugenics law was finally amended in 1996 to scrap its discriminatory provisions authorizing forced sterilization on the grounds of disabilities. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Even after the eugenics law was amended in 1996, the victims were provided with no compensation or apology for their suffering. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Hitler's
  • This continued until World War II, after which the number of sterilizations began to decrease, largely due to the fallout of Hitler's eugenics movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many will be quick to equivocate his statements to Hitler's policy of eugenics, Nyborg preemptively says that Hitler practiced extermination along racial lines, removing the intelligent with the not-so-intelligent from the gene pool. (gnxp.com)
  • Nazi
  • The eugenics movement became negatively associated with Nazi Germany and the Holocaust when many of the defendants at the Nuremberg trials attempted to justify their human rights abuses by claiming there was little difference between the Nazi eugenics programs and the U.S. eugenics programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The eugenics programs implemented in Nazi Germany are probably the main reason most people no longer acknowledge that there might be some truth to Darwin's worries. (springer.com)
  • Kuhl S (1994) The Nazi Connection: Eugenics, American Racism, and German National Socialism. (els.net)
  • These abortion advocates echo Margaret Sanger's words and beliefs in an attempt to foist Nazi-era eugenics on a new generation of Americans. (americanthinker.com)
  • The state's programme was said to be the model for the Nazi eugenics policies introduced by Adolf Hitler when he aspired to create a master race. (bbc.com)
  • principles
  • I'll begin with an overview of the problem that motivates eugenics, then describe the widely shared moral principles to which eugenicists have appealed. (springer.com)
  • The practice of eugenics reached its height in the period between the latenineteenth century and World War II, when German Nazis carried eugenic principles to the extremes of mass sterilization and genocide. (faqs.org)
  • Certain core principles and beliefs did link various eugenics movements together, however, and the three major international eugenics congresses, held in 1912, 1921, and 1932, emphasized the similarities among the various movements while also revealing the differences. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The core principles of eugenics as they came to be understood by the mid-1930s were summarized in a report, Eugenical Sterilization: A Reorientation of the Problem, published in 1936 by the Committee for the Investigation of Eugenical Sterilization of the American Neurological Association. (encyclopedia.com)
  • humans
  • The court noted that the right to decide whether to have children relates to our foundation of life as humans and is a basic individual right guaranteed under the Constitution, and that sterilization under the eugenics law unilaterally deprived the victims of this right on irrational grounds and trampled on their dignity as individuals. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • In particular, they will facilitate a new form of eugenics, the improvement of humans by deliberately choosing their inherited traits. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Likewise
  • Likewise, defending eugenics does not commit us to genetic determinism, according to which genes determine every important aspect of our personality. (springer.com)
  • Pearson, likewise, was intensely devoted to the development of a mathematical theory of evolution, and he became an acerbic advocate for eugenics. (britannica.com)
  • early
  • As an early leading force in the field of eugenics, California became the third state in the United States to enact a sterilization law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because eugenics developed in a variety of national contexts with a wide range of ideological and political programs, its content and style varied from one country to another and over time, from the early 1900s until just before the onset of World War II . (encyclopedia.com)
  • History
  • Adams M (1990) Towards a comparative history of eugenics. (els.net)
  • Allen G (1986) The Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbour, 1910-1940: An Essay in Institutional History. (els.net)
  • His main research focus is the economic, social, and political context of the history of eugenics and its implications today. (sciencemag.org)
  • Among other things, that history helps to clarify the meaning of the term eugenics in both its older and more modern usage. (sciencemag.org)
  • Mistaking Eugenics for Social Darwinism: Why Eugenics Is Missing from the History of American Economics ," History of Political Economy , Duke University Press, vol. 37(5), pages 200-233, Supplemen. (repec.org)
  • traits
  • Eugenics can be thought of as any attempt to harness the power of reproduction to produce people with traits that enable them to thrive. (springer.com)
  • sterilization of people
  • The Sendai District Court ruling on a damages suit filed by victims of forced sterilization under the old Eugenics Protection Law has determined that the law, which authorized sterilization of people with intellectual disabilities, mental illnesses and hereditary disorders to stop them from giving birth to "inferior offspring," was unconstitutional because it violated their rights to have children and pursue happiness. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • programs
  • In addition to the conquest to hurt the "undesirables" in the state, the California Eugenics plan also was a way to save the state money so they could eliminate the money the state spends on welfare and other programs that help the less fortunate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eugenics movements did not begin to arise in Europe or the United States until the first decade of the twentieth century, and they did not become generally effective in promoting social and political programs nationally or internationally until after 1910. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Origin
  • Galton's presentation of eugenics came on the heels of Charles Darwin's 1859book, The Origin of Species . (faqs.org)
  • term
  • Eugenics takes three forms in California: limiting the number of children for whom a woman on welfare can get state support, coercing drug-addicted women to surrender reproductive capacities and forcing contraception use a term of probation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek
  • The general concept of eugenics is first mentioned in Greek records dating back to 368 BC. (faqs.org)
  • founder
  • Charles Goethe: First chairman of the board of trustees for California State University, Sacramento and founder of the Eugenics Society of Northern California. (wikipedia.org)
  • largely
  • The research methods used in eugenics were based largely on the work of Gregor Johann Mendel. (ufl.edu)
  • Society
  • citation needed] David Starr Jordan: Founding president of Stanford University and chairman of the American Eugenics Commission, vice-president of the American Society for Social Hygiene, and vice-president of the Eugenics Education Society of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proceedings of the eighth annual symposium of the Eugenics Society. (worldcat.org)
  • a symposium held by the Eugenics Society in October 1964. (worldcat.org)
  • social
  • As for eugenics and procreation, I deny these lie in the realm of individual freedom and beyond the power of a lawful higher social authority. (faem.com)
  • The review covers the Chinese concept of 'Yousheng' which is more appropriate than eugenics as an expression of Chinese social policy and public attitudes. (prweb.com)
  • world
  • Different forms of eugenics have been practiced around the world and are currently in effect in the People's Republic of China, where reproduction is strictly limited. (faqs.org)
  • The Eugenics Protection Law was enacted by the Diet in 1948 in response to the serious food shortage and sharp population increase after the end of World War II. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • made
  • Recently on Twitter , evolutionary psychologist and provocateur Jesse Bering posed the question of whether a case could be made for modern-day eugenics. (blogspot.com)
  • Policy
  • The Sendai court ruling determined that it was "practically difficult" for the plaintiffs to seek damages within 20 years of their sterilization - since the procedures were performed lawfully under government policy when the eugenics law was still in place and because it was effectively hard for them to find evidence when the records of many sterilizations had been lost. (japantimes.co.jp)