• Since the 1980s and 1990s, with new assisted reproductive technology procedures available, such as gestational surrogacy (available since 1985), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (available since 1989), and cytoplasmic transfer (first performed in 1996), concern has grown about the possible revival of a more potent form of eugenics after decades of promoting human rights. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another criticism is that eugenics policies eventually lead to a loss of genetic diversity , thereby resulting in inbreeding depression due to a loss of genetic variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet another criticism of contemporary eugenics policies is that they propose to permanently and artificially disrupt millions of years of evolution, and that attempting to create genetic lines "clean" of "disorders" can have far-reaching ancillary downstream effects in the genetic ecology, including negative effects on immunity and species resilience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eugenics" comes from the Greek roots for "good" and "origin," or "good birth" and involves applying principles of genetics and heredity for the purpose of improving the human race. (nature.com)
  • In vitro eugenics might be used to study the heredity of genetic disorders and to produce cell lines of a desired character for medical applications. (bmj.com)
  • By magnifying the mythic importance our culture assigns to heredity -- and by increasingly appropriating the right to define what is 'normal' in human biology and behaviour -- molecular biologists threaten to impose a new eugenics upon society. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • In 1911, the influential geneticist Charles Davenport published Heredity in Relation to Eugenics, advancing his ideas of how genetics would improve society in the 20th century. (cshlpress.com)
  • In 1883, Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin, coined the word eugenics to express his dream of perfecting the human race by applying the laws of genetic heredity. (johnsmith.co.uk)
  • Adapting Darwin's theory of evolution to human society, eugenics soon became a powerful, international movement, committed to using the principles of heredity and statistics to encourage healthy and discourage unhealthy reproduction. (johnsmith.co.uk)
  • One of the most prominent movements to apply genetics to understanding social and personality traits was the eugenics movement, which originated in the late 19th century. (britannica.com)
  • Examining the development of eugenics in the early 20th century, especially in the United States, can be instructive for evaluating how genetics can be used and misused in biomedicine today. (sciencemag.org)
  • Available exclusively from its distributor Bullfrog Films, " A Dangerous Idea: Eugenics, Genetics and the American Dream " takes on the bogus science that underpins Trump's complaint about too many people from "shithole countries" like Haiti and not enough from Norway. (counterpunch.org)
  • With the introduction of genetics, eugenics became associated with ideology of genetic determinism in which human character was due to genes, unaffected by education or living conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite half a century of warnings by moral conservatives, advances in genetics and reproductive technology have created the conditions for a consumer-driven mass eugenics industry. (quadrant.org.au)
  • But in his provocative new book, The Science of Human Perfection , medical historian Nathaniel Comfort demonstrates that the American drive to improve health through science is something that historical eugenics and contemporary medical genetics share. (ideastations.org)
  • Eugenics made the false conclusion that genetics was purely deterministic. (uncommondescent.com)
  • The exact definition of eugenics has been a matter of debate since the term was coined by Francis Galton in 1883. (wikipedia.org)
  • In defending eugenics, I want to reclaim the spirit of authors like Francis Galton and Charles Darwin, who believed that our reproductive obligations change with our understanding of biology and our capacity to control it. (springer.com)
  • 2 His cousin Francis Galton, a polymath who founded the eugenics movement, shared Darwin's diagnosis but was more optimistic about solutions. (springer.com)
  • The term eugenics, which from its Greek roots means "good in birth," was coined by Francis Galton in 1883. (faqs.org)
  • Eugenics was coined in 1883 by British explorer and naturalist Francis Galton , who was influenced by the theory of natural selection developed by his cousin, Charles Darwin . (britannica.com)
  • Their work owed much to Francis Galton , who especially sought to apply statistical reasoning to the study of biological evolution and eugenics. (britannica.com)
  • The term eugenics was coined in 1883 by the Victorian polymath Francis Galton, geographer, statistician, and first cousin of Charles Darwin. (sciencemag.org)
  • The term eugenics was first coined by Francis Galton in the late 1800's (Norrgard 2008). (nature.com)
  • The term eugenics, derived from the Greek eugenes, was first coined by the English mathematician and geographer Francis Galton (1822 - 1911) in his Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development (1883) to refer to one born "good in stock, hereditarily endowed with noble qualities. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Eugenics had been the brainchild of Charles Darwin's cousin Francis Galton, and was developed in response to Darwin's theory of natural selection. (blogspot.com)
  • In 1883, Sir Francis Galton, a nineteenth-century English social scientist, statistician, and psychologist, coined the term "eugenics" from the Greek word eugenes , meaning well-born. (dp.la)
  • The discovery of genes - effectively in 1900, when Gregor Mendel's work was disinterred - made the selective breeding of people much harder than Francis Galton, the founder of eugenics, had expected. (rationaloptimist.com)
  • Eugenics is a term coined by a cousin of Charles Darwin, Francis Galton in 18832. (scribd.com)
  • The truth about the science of eugenics is that there is no science to eugenics. (ufl.edu)
  • Those who questioned the "settled science" of eugenics were dismissed as "deniers," much like those who question the "settled science" of climate change are today dismissed as "deniers. (uncommondescent.com)
  • Early in the twentieth century and across the world, doctors, social reformers, and politicians turned to the new science of eugenics as a means to improve and strengthen their populations. (johnsmith.co.uk)
  • These abortion advocates echo Margaret Sanger's words and beliefs in an attempt to foist Nazi-era eugenics on a new generation of Americans. (americanthinker.com)
  • Brisbane's Archbishop Mark Coleridge has compared Queensland's proposed decriminalization of abortion to Nazi Germany's eugenics program. (rt.com)
  • A conservative law group has accused the abortion industry in countries like Iceland and Denmark of carrying out "evil eugenics," pointing to very high abortion rates for unborn babies with Down syndrome in a statement before the U.N.'s Human Rights Council. (christianpost.com)
  • The abortion industry is once again using abortion to accomplish an evil eugenics agenda worldwide. (christianpost.com)
  • A History of Eugenics and Abortion A tragic chapter in American history began in the early 1900s with the rise of the eugenics movement. (thejoojoo.com)
  • What seems like individual choice in reproduction is really a very carefully controlled response to media bias toward abortion, euthanasia, and eugenics. (all.org)
  • Now this type of eugenics which existed de facto in the 96% abortion rate, is about to be codified into policy of the government of France. (catholiclane.com)
  • Furthermore, negative eugenics in particular is considered by many to be a violation of basic human rights, which include the right to reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first formal negative eugenics, that is a legal provision against birth of inferior human beings, was promulgated in Western European culture by the Christian Council of Agde in 506, which forbade marriage between cousins. (wikipedia.org)
  • It meant to him "truly- or well-born," and referred to a plan to encourage the "best people" in society to have more children (positive eugenics) and to discourage or prevent the "worst elements" of society from having many, if any, children (negative eugenics). (sciencemag.org)
  • They took two approaches: positive and negative eugenics. (dp.la)
  • The concept of positive eugenics to produce better human beings has existed at least since Plato suggested selective mating to produce a guardian class. (wikipedia.org)
  • German eugenicists were also particularly interested in increasing the number of "fitter" elements in society (positive eugenics) - where prior to the National Socialist takeover in 1933, "fitness" was understood more in terms of class than of race. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Positive eugenics encouraged healthy people perceived to have above-average intelligence to reproduce. (dp.la)
  • German professor of medicine, anthropology and eugenics Eugen Fischer was the director of this organization, a man whose work helped provide the scientific basis for the Nazis' eugenics policies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nationalists eagerly embraced eugenics as a means to legitimize their countries' superiority and racialized assumptions, and the Nazis notoriously used eugenics to shape their final solution. (johnsmith.co.uk)
  • Evolutionary theory took precedence as the human race was divided into the "fit" and "unfit," and eugenics became thescientific community's calling as it promoted ways in which, according to Galton, "social control may improve or impair the racial qualities of future generations whether physically or mentally. (faqs.org)
  • In 1883, one year after Darwin's death, Galton gave his research a name: eugenics. (wikipedia.org)
  • James Watson talks about Galton and the beginnings of Eugenics. (dnalc.org)
  • Galton defined Eugenics as the study of the agencies under social control that may improve or impair the racial qualities of future generations. (scribd.com)
  • North Carolina has voted down the first attempt to compensate the victims of its eugenics program, one of 32 such programs that sterilized tens of thousands without their knowledge or consent across the US from the 1930s to the 1970s. (rt.com)
  • Operating from 1933 to 1977, the Eugenics Board of North Carolina quietly sterilized an estimated 7,600 people, targeting minorities and poor young women due to their low income and education. (rt.com)
  • Blackmon is among the more than 7,000 people in North Carolina - many poor, many African-American, many disabled - who were sterilized between 1929 and 1976 in one of the country's most aggressive eugenics programs . (npr.org)
  • The denial letter, the only thing it really stated was that there were no records found and that her case was not approved by the North Carolina Eugenics Board," Adams says. (npr.org)
  • Eugenics programs in states like California and North Carolina sterilized thousands of people and provided models for Nazi Germany's eugenics work. (dp.la)
  • The eugenics programs implemented in Nazi Germany are probably the main reason most people no longer acknowledge that there might be some truth to Darwin's worries. (springer.com)
  • The law and its corollaries would not apply to discussions covering genocide, propaganda, eugenics (racial superiority) or other mainstays of Nazi Germany" - courtesy of Wikipedia. (catholicculture.org)
  • California eugenicists played an important, although little-known, role in the American eugenics movement's campaign for ethnic cleansing. (sfgate.com)
  • Eugenics research in Germany before and during the Nazi period was similar to that in the United States (particularly California), by which it had been partly inspired. (wikipedia.org)
  • Upon returning from Germany in 1934, where more than 5,000 people per month were being forcibly sterilized, the California eugenics leader C. M. Goethe bragged to a colleague: You will be interested to know that your work has played a powerful part in shaping the opinions of the group of intellectuals who are behind Hitler in this epoch-making program. (wikipedia.org)
  • they don't realize that the U.S. did it too," says Rebecca Kluchin, an assistant professor of History at California State University, Sacramento who specializes in the U.S. eugenics programs. (go.com)
  • Like more than half of all U.S. states, California once sterilized people against their will, in eugenics programs "that sought to prevent social ills by seeing that those who caused them were never born," as NPR reported in 2011. (wemu.org)
  • and it was from California that Ernst Rüdin of the German Society of Racial Hygiene took his model when he was appointed Reichskommissar for eugenics by the incoming National Socialist government in 1933. (rationaloptimist.com)
  • Of 32 states that had eugenics laws, none used the practice as much as California. (nytimes.com)
  • Since the 1980s and 1990s, with new assisted reproductive technology procedures available, such as gestational surrogacy (available since 1985), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (available since 1989), and cytoplasmic transfer (first performed in 1996), concern has grown about the possible revival of a more potent form of eugenics after decades of promoting human rights. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular, they will facilitate a new form of eugenics, the improvement of humans by deliberately choosing their inherited traits. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • This systematic elimination of affected children before - or even at birth - is a contemporary form of eugenics and racism," it continued. (christianpost.com)
  • Different forms of eugenics have been practiced around the world and are currently in effect in the People's Republic of China, where reproduction is strictly limited. (faqs.org)
  • Recently on Twitter , evolutionary psychologist and provocateur Jesse Bering posed the question of whether a case could be made for modern-day eugenics. (blogspot.com)
  • The controversial practice is referred to as a modern day eugenics scheme in the lawsuit filed by advocacy lawyers of a pro bono legal group of a national GPS monitoring company. (jdjournal.com)
  • President and CEO Mike Donovan of Nexus Services Inc. said, "This case is nothing more than a modern day eugenics scheme. (jdjournal.com)
  • The documentary suggests persuasively that the US, with its own long fascination with eugenics, most likely sub-contracted these experiments to Israel as a way to bypass the increasing domestic legal impediments it faced. (mwcnews.net)
  • The advent and broad acceptance of Darwinism in the late nineteenth century, combined with a more general belief in the power of science and scientific management to solve social problems, led to a fascination with eugenics and the possibility of using public policy to ensure the "survival of the fittest" and the purity and strength of the human race. (fee.org)
  • Early advocates of eugenics considered it as a way of improving groups of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advocates of eugenics add that we should also manipulate biology to promote well-being, provided we can do so without imposing undue risk on our children or on other people with whom they will share the planet. (springer.com)
  • Defending eugenics does not commit us to endorsing state-sponsored coercion, nor to the parochial views held by some advocates of eugenics in the early twentieth century. (springer.com)
  • From Cold Spring Harbor, eugenics advocates agitated in the legislatures of America, as well as the nation's social service agencies and associations. (sfgate.com)
  • American eugenics advocates believed with religious fervor that the same Mendelian concepts determining the color and size of peas, corn and cattle also governed the social and intellectual character of man. (sfgate.com)
  • Synthetic biology advocates are veering too close to eugenics. (slate.com)
  • One of the early advocates of eugenics in the United States was Margaret Sanger, founder of what was to become Planned Parenthood. (americanthinker.com)
  • Eugenics advocates claimed their methods would result in healthier, fitter babies and would dramatically limit human suffering. (johnsmith.co.uk)
  • Since the 1980s and 1990s, when new assisted reproductive technology procedures became available such as gestational surrogacy (available since 1985), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (available since 1989), and cytoplasmic transfer (first performed in 1996), fear has emerged about a possible revival of eugenics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even after the eugenics law was amended in 1996, the victims were provided with no compensation or apology for their suffering. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • By the time the eugenics law was scrapped in 1996, around 25,000 people had been sterilized on the basis of their disabilities - including some 16,500 without their consent - according to the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry and the Japan Federation of Bar Associations. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Agar describes three technologies that may soon make liberal eugenics a practical possibility - cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer, genomics, and genetic engineering - and argues that parents can use these technologies to realize their procreative goals without harming the people they will bring into existence. (booktopia.com.au)
  • This paper discusses the potential of this technology to make possible what I call ' in vitro eugenics': the deliberate breeding of human beings in vitro by fusing sperm and egg derived from different stem-cell lines to create an embryo and then deriving new gametes from stem cells derived from that embryo. (bmj.com)
  • In particular, it might allow what I will call ' in vitro eugenics': the deliberate breeding of human beings in vitro by fusing sperm and egg derived from different stem-cell lines to create an embryo and then deriving new gametes from stem cells derived from that embryo, which in turn might be used in the creation of another embryo. (bmj.com)
  • Alternatively, gene selection rather than "people selection" has recently been made possible through advances in genome editing, leading to what is sometimes called new eugenics, also known as neo-eugenics, consumer eugenics, or liberal eugenics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liberal Eugenics offers refreshingly sensible guidance to the possibilities of cloning, genetic therapy, and genetic enhancement by reference to our ?moral images? (booktopia.com.au)
  • With Liberal Eugenics , Nicholas Agar has given us a lively, sophisticated defense of genetic enhancement, challenging the anxious sentimentality of biotech luddites without embracing the naïve, reckless optimism of bio-tech enthusiasts. (booktopia.com.au)
  • During this period, the American Eugenics Society was founded, in addition to many local societies and groups around the country (PBS 1998). (nature.com)
  • Kingsley Davis was in fact listed as a member ('56 and '74) and director ('52 to '55) of the American Eugenics Society . (conspiracyarchive.com)
  • American Eugenics Society (Pres. (conspiracyarchive.com)
  • Nazi eugenics (German: Nationalsozialistische Rassenhygiene, "National Socialist racial hygiene") were Nazi Germany's racially based social policies that placed the biological improvement of the Aryan race or Germanic "Übermenschen" master race through eugenics at the center of Nazi ideology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Support for eugenics and racial hygiene increased with the encouragement of Margaret Sanger in the United States. (faqs.org)
  • In 1910, Davenport founded the Eugenics Record Office (ERO) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island "to improve the natural, physical, mental, and temperamental qualities of the human family" (Norrgard 2008). (nature.com)
  • Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Eugenics Records Office. (els.net)
  • Eugenics clubs and societies grew rapidly and many of the leading intellectuals of the early twentieth century, including a number of well-known economists (such as John Maynard Keynes and Irving Fisher, perhaps the most famous American economist of the time), were active in these groups and saw their work through the lens of eugenics. (fee.org)
  • In the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century United States, eugenics programs received widespread public support. (dp.la)
  • Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution , the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. (sfgate.com)
  • The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz. (sfgate.com)
  • Eugenics movements did not begin to arise in Europe or the United States until the first decade of the twentieth century, and they did not become generally effective in promoting social and political programs nationally or internationally until after 1910. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Eugenics, a widely accepted practice in the USA, would evolve into genocide as Hitler became more and more rabid in his racial enmity. (counterpunch.org)
  • The practice of eugenics aims to improve the genetic quality of a human population through selective breeding-encouraging reproduction for the "strongest" humans while discouraging reproduction for the "weakest" humans. (dp.la)
  • And, it should be perfectly acceptable for a mother to practice eugenics by carefully choosing which child of desired traits she allows to live and which she kills. (freerepublic.com)
  • Roll‐Hansen N (1988) The Progress of Eugenics: Growth of Knowledge and Change in Ideology. (els.net)
  • In many respects, the ideology behind eugenics long predated Darwin and the theory of evolution, and this ideology still exists today, even amongst those who don't accept evolution. (uncommondescent.com)
  • This odious ideology, based on an odious (and scientifically vacuous) assertion that natural selection is the origin of man, is the foundation of eugenics, and is Darwin's only real legacy to medicine. (evolutionnews.org)
  • The earliest eugenics movements were founded in Germany in 1904, in Britain in 1907, and in the United States in 1908 - 1910. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Allen G (1986) The Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbour, 1910-1940: An Essay in Institutional History. (els.net)
  • Modern bioethicists who advocate new eugenics describe it as a way of enhancing individual traits, regardless of group membership. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eugenics can be thought of as any attempt to harness the power of reproduction to produce people with traits that enable them to thrive. (springer.com)
  • Supporters regarded eugenics as a social philosophy for the improvement of human hereditary traits through the promotion of higher reproduction of certain people and traits, and the reduction of reproduction of other people and traits. (prweb.com)
  • Eugenics, the art of breeding better men, imperatively demands reliable measurement of human traits of body and mind, of their inter-relations, and of their modification by environmental factors. (blogspot.com)
  • Certain core principles and beliefs did link various eugenics movements together, however, and the three major international eugenics congresses, held in 1912, 1921, and 1932, emphasized the similarities among the various movements while also revealing the differences. (encyclopedia.com)
  • giving an overview of the symposium's focus: the history of eugenics movements in North America, and why they are disturbingly relevant today. (wordpress.com)
  • These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics' racist aims. (sfgate.com)
  • His main research focus is the economic, social, and political context of the history of eugenics and its implications today. (sciencemag.org)
  • Adams M (1990) Towards a comparative history of eugenics. (els.net)
  • Mistaking Eugenics for Social Darwinism: Why Eugenics Is Missing from the History of American Economics ," History of Political Economy , Duke University Press, vol. 37(5), pages 200-233, Supplemen. (repec.org)
  • This time they break down the history of Big Oil carbon eugenics agenda and the future of the technocratic post-carbon world. (corbettreport.com)
  • Roundtable talk on the "Disability in the History of Eugenics" given October 9, 2009 at the conference Eugenics and Disability: History and Legacy in Washington. (thejoojoo.com)
  • The people currently wrecking homes and businesses, statues and churches have a history with eugenics as well. (uncommondescent.com)
  • The widespread acceptance of eugenics in the United States, especially by progressives, is a troubling part of U.S. history unknown to many Americans, and the role model America provided for Nazi race law is even more troubling. (uncommondescent.com)
  • Tonight on Corbett Report Radio James dips into the corbettreport.com archive for interviews, articles and episodes that help to shine light on the eugenics agenda and the "elite's" obsession with preserving their genes…and eliminating ours. (corbettreport.com)
  • This blog is the combined effort of a team of researchers and community members working around the world in different disciplines to address concerns around human variation, normalcy, eugenics, and enhancement. (wordpress.com)
  • Proceedings of the eighth annual symposium of the Eugenics Society. (worldcat.org)
  • a symposium held by the Eugenics Society in October 1964. (worldcat.org)
  • The Eugenics Society reached its peak, in terms of membership, during the 1930s, and the cusp of the following decade saw the zenith of its prestige. (blogspot.com)
  • And a good deal of it was undertaken at meetings of the Eugenics Society. (blogspot.com)
  • His scheme of family allowances had originally been devised within the Eugenics Society with a graduated rate, which paid out more to middle-class parents and very little to the poor. (blogspot.com)
  • This is how the Eugenics Society conceived of its funding for the IPPF. (conspiracyarchive.com)
  • He rejects the idea that eugenics need divide society into genetic haves and have-nots, and denies that social pressures need force eugenic choices to converge on a single view of human excellence, suggesting that these threats to liberal social arrangements can be resisted. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Eugenics was widely accepted by academics, politicians, intellectuals, government, the U.S. Supreme Court, and especially progressives, who supported eugenics-inspired policies as policy instruments to be utilized by an interventionist administrative state to establish a healthy and productive society. (uncommondescent.com)
  • She published numerous books on Eugenics and a 'Eugenics Review' for the society itself and was a 'life fellow' until her death. (ipbhost.com)
  • Upon her death in 1958 she left her clinic and a substantial part of her assets to the Eugenics Society. (ipbhost.com)
  • Much attention has been paid in recent months to America's silent eugenics program. (rt.com)
  • China has been running the world's largest and most successful eugenics program for more than thirty years, driving China's ever-faster rise as the global superpower. (blogspot.com)
  • I'm afraid the chip could be activated in some harmful way," such as a future eugenics program, Whitehead said. (lifesitenews.com)
  • These publications contained a Zionist worldview of which eugenics formed an integral part, subjecting Jewish mothers to an unremitting program of education, indoctrination and regulation. (realjewnews.com)
  • Patient records showed how the eugenics program was driven by the prejudices of the day. (nytimes.com)
  • Galton's presentation of eugenics came on the heels of Charles Darwin's 1859book, The Origin of Species . (faqs.org)
  • but Claudia Cohen Hall is on the medical campus at Penn, so I surmise that the presentations will be on eugenics (apologies for it, I hope), which is Darwin's only legacy to medicine. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Darwin's theory was (and is) indispensable for only one thing in medicine: eugenics. (evolutionnews.org)
  • For the past century, Darwin's only legacy to medicine has been eugenics. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Eugenics has been viewed as an imperative (and still is) by many Darwinists, because if the origin of human beings is natural selection ("survival of the fittest"), then human compassion for the weak (i.e. human civilization) impairs natural selection, and a corrective is needed to avert degeneration of our race. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Afterwards, he proudly shared the award with his colleagues, remarking that he felt that it symbolized the "common understanding of German and American scientists of the nature of eugenics. (wikipedia.org)