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  • endoscopy
  • The condition must also be excluded from esophageal cancer, which may be done at the time of endoscopy, or which may require esophageal biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Food boluses are common in the course of illness in patients with esophageal cancer but are more difficult to treat as endoscopy to push the bolus is less safe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Esophageal webs can be ruptured during upper endoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most classic sign of AEN is the dark pigmentation of esophageal mucosa in an upper endoscopy, usually viewed as an ulcer or as an infectious disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advanced age (average patient aged 57 years old) Male sex (4 to 1 male dominance) Cirrhosis AIDS Herpes virus Atrial fibrilation Diabetes (currently the most prevalent out of all conditions in patients) Aortic dissection Anti-cardiolipin antibodies CMV infection Herpetic infection Hyperglycemia Hypersensitivity to broad-spectrum antibiotics Hypothermia Ischemia Gastric volvulus Posterior mediastinal haematoma Septic shock Steven Johnson syndrome Acute esophageal necrosis can only be diagnosed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Esophageal cancer is at times treated with surgery. (oncolink.org)
  • This article reviews the different surgical procedures used to treat esophageal cancer, the possible risks associated, and how to manage after surgery. (oncolink.org)
  • For resectable esophageal primaries, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy plus surgery can downstage disease and improve outcome over surgery alone. (springer.com)
  • Shapiro J, van Lanschot JJ, Hulshof MC et al (2015) Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for esophageal or junctional cancer (CROSS): long term results of a randomised controlled trial. (springer.com)
  • Tepper J, Krasna MJ, Niedzwiecki D et al (2008) Phase III trial of trimodality therapy with cisplatin, fluorouracil, radiotherapy, and surgery compared with surgery alone for esophageal cancer: CALGB 9781. (springer.com)
  • Early-stage esophageal cancers can be treated endoscopically avoiding the need for other modalities, while locoregionally advanced tumors require chemotherapy with radiation followed by surgery. (springer.com)
  • Expectation, outcomes, and potential complications of esophageal surgery as well as rationale for various surgical techniques are discussed in detail. (springer.com)
  • endoscopic
  • Esophageal cancers are staged using endoscopic ultrasonography and computed tomography to assess for depth of invasion, nodal disease, and distant metastatic disease. (springer.com)
  • odynophagia
  • Complications of esophageal dilatation include the following: Odynophagia, or painful swallowing Hematemesis, or bloody vomit Esophageal perforation Mediastinitis Welsh JD, Griffiths WJ, McKee J, Wilkinson D, Flournoy DJ, Mohr JA (April 1983). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thoracic
  • The esophageal plexus and the cardiac plexus contain the same types of fibers and are both considered thoracic autonomic plexus(es). (wikipedia.org)
  • stricture
  • PDRhealth - Esophageal Stricture: (http://www.pdrhealth.com/disease/disease-mono.aspx?contentFileName=ND7417G.xml&contentName=Esophageal+Stricture&contentId=506&TypeId=2) Ginex, Pamela K., Manjit S. Bains, Jacqueline Hanson, and Bart L. Frazzitta. (wikipedia.org)