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  • STEC
  • STEC, Shiga toxin-producing Esherichia coli . (cdc.gov)
  • This report describes the results of the investigation, which determined that the illnesses were caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111 (STEC O111) infections. (cdc.gov)
  • During April-July, 10 inmates at the facility received a diagnosis of laboratory-confirmed STEC O111 infection, and a retrospective prevalence study of 100 inmates found that, during March-April, 14 other inmates had experienced diarrheal illness suspected of being STEC O111 infection. (cdc.gov)
  • An environmental investigation determined that inmates employed at the dairy might have acquired STEC O111 infection on the job or transported contaminated clothing or other items into the main correctional facility and kitchen, thereby exposing other inmates. (cdc.gov)
  • No staff members reported symptoms consistent with STEC infection, and diarrheal illness was not reported at other Colorado correctional facilities. (cdc.gov)
  • The type of bacteria responsible for this outbreak was among those referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli or STEC. (cdc.gov)
  • Shiga Toxin
  • Clinical isolates were typed as E. coli O121:H19 (one case was typed as E. coli O121:H undetermined) with Shiga toxin 2-producing genes by in silico toxin testing and had closely related PFGE patterns and WGS. (blogspot.com)
  • 2017
  • In March 2017, E. coli O121 with the outbreak PFGE pattern was isolated from an open flour sample from a patient's home and a closed sample collected at a retail store, both of the same brand and production date. (blogspot.com)
  • PFGE
  • Public health investigators used DNA "fingerprints" of E. coli bacteria obtained through diagnostic testing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or PFGE, to identify cases of illness that were part of this outbreak. (cdc.gov)
  • outbreaks
  • To prevent similar outbreaks in correctional facilities, authorities should consult with public health officials to design and implement effective infection control measures. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of the recent emergence of E. coli outbreaks linked to flour, public health professionals should consider flour as a possible source in E. coli outbreaks and communicate the risk associated with exposure to flour, raw batter, and dough in public health messaging. (blogspot.com)
  • O121
  • Knowledge of a recent E. coli O121 flour-associated outbreak prompted interviewers to ask about baking and exposure to raw flour or dough ( 1 ). (blogspot.com)
  • Surveillance
  • They used data from PulseNet , the national subtyping network made up of state and local public health laboratories and federal food regulatory laboratories that performs molecular surveillance of foodborne infections. (cdc.gov)