Loading...
  • measles
  • William H. McNeill (b.1917), a world historian, noted in chapter three of his book Plagues and Peoples (1976) that the Roman Empire suffered the severe and protacted Antonine Plague starting around 165 A.D. For about twenty years, waves of one or more diseases, possibly the first epidemics of smallpox and/or measles, swept through the Empire, ultimately killing about half the population. (novaroma.org)
  • THE UNITED STATES and Central America are in the grip of their worst measles epidemics in years. (newscientist.com)
  • About 40 per cent of those who have contracted measles in the current epidemic have been vaccinated, according to Bill Atkinson at the CDC. (newscientist.com)
  • America
  • Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America is a book by Robert Whitaker published in 2010 by Crown. (wikipedia.org)
  • papers
  • A theory of dynamics and inequalities under epidemics ," CORE Discussion Papers 2007037, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE). (repec.org)
  • A theory of dynamics and inequalities under epidemics ," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007022, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques. (repec.org)
  • social
  • Bringing together interdisciplinary discussions across medical anthropology, social epidemiology, political ecology and human geography, this conference connects perceptions of the natural world as a threat to human health, and of epidemics as a result of human intervention in the natural, to practices and trajectories (discursive, aesthetic, and political) of naturalization. (cam.ac.uk)
  • In general, the Red Cross Red Crescent response to epidemics prioritizes creating awareness, advocating effective action, social mobilization based on volunteer activities and logistics support (transport, warehouses, etc). (ifrc.org)
  • Indeed, Scott (2001) notes with irony that the writings of those who claimed that 'satanic ritual abuse' is a 'moral panic' had many of the features of a moral panic: scapegoating therapists, social workers and sexual abuse victims whilst warning of an impending social catastrophe brought on by an epidemic of false allegations of sexual abuse. (goodreads.com)
  • world
  • Epidemic events have profoundly shaped human perceptions of the natural world and human ways of relating to and engaging with nature. (cam.ac.uk)
  • The epidemics have prompted eerily similar reactions from health officials and the public, raising crucial questions about why the world remains persistently unprepared to react to the sudden emergence of viral threats. (nytimes.com)
  • diseases
  • How are "invisible" epidemics of non-communicable diseases produced as unnatural, for example, in the case of the presence of diseases of (supposed) surplus and overconsumption where they are assumed not to exist? (cam.ac.uk)
  • Similar epidemics caused by new diseases may have weakened the Chinese Han empire and contributed to its collapse. (novaroma.org)
  • city
  • The once thriving city soon became distraught under the raging epidemic, leaving many to fight for their own lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rush alerted his colleagues and the government that the city faced an epidemic of "highly contagious, as well as mortal. (wikipedia.org)
  • List
  • This document discusses those changes made by the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act which primarily affect persons selling products containing the List I chemicals ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine. (usdoj.gov)
  • health
  • In response to this increase, the Washington State Secretary of Health declared a pertussis epidemic on April 3, 2012. (cdc.gov)
  • In Nicaragua, epidemics come about once every four to five years, so the southern region's health officials had anticipated problems in 1990. (newscientist.com)
  • title
  • The Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 ( Title VII of the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005, P.L. 109-177 ) was signed into law March 9, 2006. (usdoj.gov)
  • worst
  • The worst-hit countries are Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, which has already reported 2436 cases - as many as in the whole of 1986, when the last epidemic occurred, according to the WHO's regional office in Washington DC. (newscientist.com)
  • control
  • Epidemic control measures comprise mosquito destruction and elimination of breeding sites and the use of mosquito repellents by exposed persons. (ifrc.org)
  • As fall began, the flu epidemic spiraled out of control. (history.com)
  • impact
  • What is the historical and contemporary impact of equilibrium approaches to epidemics, whether these focus on human-made imbalance or on epidemics as nature's re-balancing act? (cam.ac.uk)
  • time
  • An epidemic is generally a large number of cases of an illness in a relatively short period of time. (bio.net)
  • brought
  • The mortality rate peaked in October, before frost finally killed the mosquitoes and brought an end to the epidemic in November. (wikipedia.org)
  • kind
  • Epidemics may be the consequence of disasters of another kind, such as tropical storms , floods , earthquakes , droughts , etc. (ifrc.org)
  • government
  • But the official foot-dragging that first greeted the AIDS epidemic wound up pitting activists against government agencies and officials. (nytimes.com)