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  • particles
  • Tom Carpenter, executive director of another watchdog group, the Hanford Challenge in central Washington state, said that the Energy Department as recently as last year released an unknown quantity of radioactive particles during demolition of a shuttered weapons factory, the Plutonium Finishing Plant. (latimes.com)
  • The approach typically involves (1) ultra sensitive chemical or radiometric analyses of particles separated on the basis of size, density, mineral or magnetic properties, (2) analysis of chemical extracts that selectively attack certain components of coal or fly ash, (3) direct observation and microbeam analysis of very small areas or grains, and (4) radiographic techniques that identify the location and abundance of radioactive elements. (usgs.gov)
  • Earth's
  • Despite their name, rare-earth elements are - with the exception of the radioactive promethium - relatively plentiful in Earth's crust , with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper . (wikipedia.org)
  • plutonium
  • Recent documents released by the U.S. Department of Energy provide evidence to suggest that a small proportion of other toxic heavy metals such as plutonium also may be present. (ratical.org)
  • soil
  • However, legacy hazards from the Cold War continue to constitute a challenge, as do efforts to clean up contaminated soil and water inside and outside the complex. (ehstoday.com)
  • The radon arising in the soil partly reaches the surface and is released into the atmosphere. (bfs.de)
  • radionuclides
  • The "Basic Recommendations for civil protection in the vicinity of nuclear facilities" and the "Radiological basis for decisions on measures to protect the population against Accidental Releases of radionuclides" regulate these measures. (bfs.de)
  • plume
  • Dr. Vassily Nesterenko, head of the Ukrainian Nuclear establishment at the time of the accident, flew over the burning reactor and took the only measurements of the radioactive plume. (ratical.org)
  • risks
  • Our communities have historically been forced to deal with significant health and environmental risks and we must ensure their health and safety in the wake of this fire, as well as those that may occur in the future. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that one in four Americans lives within 3 miles of a contaminated site, many of which pose serious risks to human health and the environment. (gao.gov)
  • leak
  • Dose assessment modeling of the leak "showed a potential dose of less than one millirem at each of the environmental sampling locations," about a tenth the amount a person would receive from a chest X-ray, the release said. (wtvr.com)
  • materials
  • Proposals involving human subjects, vertebrate animals, radioactive materials, or biohazards require special approval before they can be submitted. (bowdoin.edu)
  • Radioactive Materials. (bowdoin.edu)
  • As an expert in surface chemistry, Gardella also investigates topics relevant to the development of new materials for coatings, drug delivery and controlled release for wound healing. (buffalo.edu)
  • ACCIDENT
  • A study completed in the mid-1990s, however, refutes those findings stating that "cancer incidence, specifically, lung cancer and leukemia , increased more following the TMI accident in areas estimated to have been in the pathway of radioactive plumes than in other areas. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Chemicals
  • After drilling a well, fracking operators forcefully flush a cocktail of water, sand, and chemicals into it in order to crack open the rock and release oil and gas. (nrdc.org)
  • potential
  • Kaltofen also reviewed an internal study in March by an Energy Department contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, that found a calculated potential dose of 95 millirems for workers, roughly 10 times the federal Environmental Protection Agency standard. (latimes.com)
  • Industrial
  • The petition calls on the De Blasio administration to take the lead in developing and implementing a more comprehensive environmental and public health plan as a response to the fire and future commercial/industrial fires like it. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • public
  • That's why the Birmingham environmental injury lawyers with Norris Injury Lawyers say a group of public school students have filed a lawsuit against the City of Birmingham, the Birmingham Police Department, and several officers, stemming from their use of chemical sprays to control students. (norrisinjurylawyers.com)
  • These concentrations remain well below a level of public or environmental hazard," the department said Monday in a news release. (wtvr.com)
  • Department
  • I have written a letter to the commissioners of the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene and the New York City Department of Environmental Protection requesting their support and I look forward to their assistance. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • After a series of three releases during 2017, the Energy Department shut down the demolition and has yet to resume it. (latimes.com)
  • Similarly, the Department of Defense (DOD) addresses hazards at thousands of contaminated areas on active and former military installations. (gao.gov)
  • elements
  • In order to accurately address these questions and to predict the mobility of radioactive elements during the coal fuel-cycle, it is important to determine the concentration, distribution, and form of radioactive elements in coal and fly ash. (usgs.gov)
  • however
  • however, the funder and the College require IRB approval prior to the release of funds. (bowdoin.edu)
  • By the same token, however, little of that gas will be released if one simply drills a well into the shale. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • power
  • Warnings about the declining reserves of coal , petroleum , and natural gas , along with concerns for the environmental hazards posed by power plants run on fossil fuels , fed the hope that nuclear power would soon have a growing role in energy production. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Studies
  • The present invention relates to a method for the administration via bolus type delivery of medicaments employed for either diagnostic studies--such as radioactive gases, aerosols or insufflations for studying pulmonary ventilation function--or for therapeutic applications. (google.com)
  • Includes
  • Includes all the bells and whistles you and your students have come to expect It's hard to imagine a book more innovative and groundbreaking than Living with the Earth: Concepts in Environmental Health Science, Third Edition. (environmental-expert.com)
  • A method and apparatus for the bolus administration of a gas such as a radioactive gas includes a face mask defining a closed space into which a straw-like administration tube extends sufficiently to permit a patient wearing the face mask to suck on the tube. (google.com)
  • content
  • Depending on the radioactive substance, its content in the medium to be analysed and the nature of the medium, various methods for analysis and measurement are used. (bfs.de)