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  • moral
  • What makes these emotions count as moral ones is that they are related to the "laws of proper behavior and customs in daily life" (2). (nd.edu)
  • adopt a representational approach to understanding the neural bases of moral emotions rather than a process approach. (nd.edu)
  • More precisely, on their view the elicitation of moral emotions is carried out by dynamic prefrontal cortex-temporolimbic network representations, which arise from the activation of one or more of the following six components: attachment, aggressiveness, social rank, outcome assessment, agency, and norm violation (13). (nd.edu)
  • They end their paper by briefly but systematically sketching how each moral emotion may depend on particular combinations of these six components. (nd.edu)
  • need to acknowledge better the role of background moral theories, (b) they need to explain how basic reward-processing relates to the six components above, and (c) they need to combine a representational approach together with a process approach to the moral emotions (19). (nd.edu)
  • s criterion for what makes an emotion moral, (ii) concerns about the role of the basic emotions and the lack of discussion of inhibition, (iii) concerns about certain of the six components, and (iv) concerns about inadequate attention devoted to the role of propositional content. (nd.edu)
  • And the history of ideas about emotion provides several important threads in the history of ethics, whether in the guise of "passion as a threat to reason" or in the more benign role of sympathy and the moral sentiments. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If emotions are such as to contribute to our well-being and the good life, and if emotions motivate moral behavior, then it makes good sense to say that emotions are rational or at least contribute to rationality. (encyclopedia.com)
  • sentiments
  • In contrast to this view, I argue that character can be understood as a complex stratification of motives whose relation to emotions and sentiments can be accounted for without resorting to any "out of character" explanation. (springer.com)
  • responses
  • Emotions are complex psychophysical processes that evoke positive or negative psychological responses (or both) and physical expressions, often involuntary. (wikiquote.org)
  • Psychology
  • Ideas about emotions and their function in human and animal life have been a major theme in philosophy - and more recently in psychology and the social sciences - since the time of the ancient Greeks. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Therefore
  • Therefore, psychopathy seems more related to changes in the ability to adjust PID depending on the social context than to an overall tolerance for shorter PIDs. (psychologicalscience.org)
  • Therefore, the effects of high negative urgency on psychopathology might be diminished by clinical interventions targeting emotion regulation. (psychologicalscience.org)
  • rational
  • Even seemingly rational decisions are influenced by emotion. (conversionxl.com)
  • And are emotions rational? (encyclopedia.com)
  • An emotion is for the most part an unconscious or at least not necessarily conscious physiological process, which may or may not still serve an evolutionary function but does not involve sufficient "cognition" to be rational in any meaningful sense. (encyclopedia.com)
  • By contrast, Aristotle (384 - 322 b.c.e.) insisted that emotions, while fully natural, are also an essential part of rational, civilized life and themselves social and cultural, consisting of ideas, learned and cultivated and even "intelligent. (encyclopedia.com)
  • suggests
  • One train of thought since ancient times suggests that the emotions are indeed an aspect of our animal life, unsuitable to civilized life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People
  • Some people are naturally more in touch with their emotions than others. (kidshealth.org)
  • He studied people with brain damage that prevented them from feeling emotions. (conversionxl.com)
  • And usually, people have no trouble figuring out what emotions a tennis player is feeling when they see a photo of that player standing on a tennis court, clutching a racket. (kuow.org)
  • And when people saw the body alone, they easily knew if this was a positive or negative emotion," explains Aviezer. (kuow.org)
  • I think that many people will find this very surprising," says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a scientist at Northeastern University who studies emotions. (kuow.org)
  • Tears also often tend to come when people are experiencing mixed emotions," says Tom Lutz, the author of Crying: The Natural & Cultural History of Tears ($23, amazon.com ). (realsimple.com)
  • tend
  • The history of ideas about emotion is thus divided into two sometimes complex and interweaving tracks in which emotions tend to be "dumb" and "sophisticated," respectively. (encyclopedia.com)
  • body
  • Dolphins read each other's emotions by sonar and it's the inside of the body, the configuration of the viscera, that lets dolphins know whether the dolphin they are meeting is tense or happy. (wikiquote.org)
  • Your body may be churing away in high gear, but unless you can interpret, explain, and label those change, you will not feel a true emotion. (cram.com)
  • body language is important and how you move your body, determines your emotion. (cram.com)
  • What he found was that the exact same face would be interpreted as showing a positive or negative emotion, depending on which body it was on. (kuow.org)
  • In medieval medicine, the emotions were the result of organic "humors" in the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Having no body (mental or physical) you are forced to rely on the one thing still remaining: your emotion. (indie-rpgs.com)
  • impression
  • For the nature of the speech that we have composed within our minds is not so important as the manner in which we produce it, since the emotion of each member of our audience will depend on the impression made upon his hearing. (uchicago.edu)
  • upon
  • I do not literally paint that table, but the emotion it produces upon me. (wikiquote.org)
  • The reason for this is that although his aim is to set forth "the right way of living" (E4app, G II/266) and to explain "what freedom of mind, or blessedness, is" (E5pref, G II/277), his accounts of these things depend upon certain key metaphysical principles that he feels must be established first. (utm.edu)
  • results
  • This paper reports the results of a case study which tracked the emotions of two visitors to Philadelphia, USA over four days. (springer.com)
  • equally
  • Although our conclusions may not apply equally well to all emotions, we maintain that the lessons from fear provide general principles that can at least be used as a starting point for theorizing about many emotions. (pnas.org)
  • practice
  • This is the best way to practice putting emotions into words, a skill that helps us feel closer to friends, boyfriends or girlfriends, parents, coaches - anyone. (rchsd.org)
  • Just like anything else in life, when it comes to emotions, practice makes perfect! (rchsd.org)
  • human
  • In this unexpected scenario, the UFO occupants -- despite their obvious technological superiority -- are desperate for both human genetic material and the ability to feel human emotions -- particularly maternal emotions. (wikiquote.org)
  • Emotions like these are part of human nature. (kidshealth.org)
  • The history of ideas about emotion is an essential part of the history of ideas about human nature and about human continuity - and discontinuity - with other animals. (encyclopedia.com)
  • certain
  • In this paper, I wish to consider the extent to which emotions depend on certain dispositions that are often identified in the literature as character traits. (springer.com)
  • View
  • In this paper we challenge the conventional view, which argues that emotions are innately programmed in subcortical circuits, and propose instead that emotions are higher-order states instantiated in cortical circuits. (pnas.org)
  • often
  • Emotions like fear are often said to have been inherited from animal ancestors ( 1 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ - 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • natural
  • This study introduces a new approach to assess travellers' emotions in natural settings, and discusses the implications of this approach within the context of designing tourism places. (springer.com)