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  • sperm
  • Then, after a long search, they finally found the best way to stimulate each egg so that it would develop into an embryo without the need to be fertilized with sperm. (kwit.org)
  • Specifically, the repository will archive, maintain and distribute up to 8,500 strains of embryonic stem cell clones, live mouse lines, frozen embryos and sperm and vectors - while assuring product quality and availability for all materials. (genome.gov)
  • Spaced-out aliens making human babies, copies of a castrated race horse, a Danish clinic selling three grades of sperm, the burning of twins and Xeroxed people were some of the ideas aired at The Times Higher's debate on how history will judge cloning. (timeshighereducation.com)
  • When a chromosome from a sperm cell joins with that of an egg, these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs or "snips") tend not to match each other. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This cell is created when a sperm fertilizes an egg. (brightkite.com)
  • In general, in organisms that reproduce sexually, an embryo develops from a zygote, the single cell resulting from the fertilization of the female egg cell by the male sperm cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (Disclosure of Donor Information) Regulations 2004/1511, enabled donor-conceived children to access the identity of their sperm, egg or embryo donor upon reaching the age of 18. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Regulations were implemented on 1 April 2005 and any donor who donated sperm, eggs or embryos from that date onwards is, by law, identifiable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Italy has a 2004 law that forbids all sperm or egg donations and the freezing of embryos, but allows, in effect, using existing stem cell lines that have been imported. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eggan's technique provides a window into exactly what happens to turn back the clock in cells during cloning--and, indeed, in the normal process of creating sperm, eggs and embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early Embryo
  • The primates are used in pure and applied biomedical research into fertility control, early embryo development, obesity, brain development and degeneration, and newly emerging viruses, especially AIDS-related agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • The skin cell nucleus was then fused with the donor egg cell. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The nucleus of a body cell is removed and inserted into an egg cell which has had its nucleus removed. (abc.net.au)
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The technique consists of taking an enucleated oocyte (egg cell) and implanting a donor nucleus from a somatic (body) cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a technique for cloning in which the nucleus of a somatic cell is transferred to the cytoplasm of an enucleated egg. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nucleus of the donor egg cell is removed and discarded, leaving it 'deprogrammed. (wikipedia.org)
  • After being inserted into the egg, the somatic cell nucleus is reprogrammed by its host egg cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process involves sucking out the nucleus of a somatic (body) cell and injecting it into an oocyte that has had its nucleus removed Using an approach based on the protocol outlined by Tachibana et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • the target cells are then transfected with the plasmids, and the gene products are expressed and enter the nucleus to access the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce an embryo
  • In what is being described as a "significant milestone" for medicine, the team from Oregon Health and Science University successfully used a technique which utilised a human skin cell and a woman's egg to produce an embryo which was a genetic copy of the original skin cell. (abc.net.au)
  • Bryophytes and ferns also produce an embryo, but do not produce seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • frozen
  • Additionally, surrogates showed a significantly higher pregnancy rate following frozen embryo transfers than their non-surrogate counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic material
  • They repeated the process - this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man. (wunc.org)
  • Next, they removed most of the DNA from each egg and replaced the genetic material with DNA from other peoples' skin cells. (kwit.org)
  • Dr Mitalipov said that since the reprogrammed cells use genetic material from the patient, there was no concern about transplant rejection. (abc.net.au)
  • Cryoconservation of animal genetic resources is a practice in which animal germplasms, such as embryos are collected and stored at low temperatures with the intent of conserving the genetic material. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • He'd like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes. (wunc.org)
  • In a separate analysis, they also found that three regions lacked the chemical modifications, or imprinting, that paternal genes impose on a fertilized embryo to prevent those genes from being activated. (scientificamerican.com)
  • These genes direct how and what the pluripotent cells become. (brightkite.com)