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  • stem
  • Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell line(ZZUi006-A)from a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The fibroblasts from a patient with DM1 were successfully converted to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), designated ZZUi006-A, by employing episomal plasmids expressing OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, LIN28, L-MYC. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line from urinary cells of a patient with primary congenital glaucoma using integration free Sendai technology. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We have generated a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line derived from urinary cells of a 10years old patient with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line, KSCBi003-A, from human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells using a chromosomal integration-free system. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We generated a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) line, KSCBi003-A, from adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs) using a Sendai virus-based gene delivery system. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Generation of ZZUi008-A, a transgene-free, induced pluripotent stem cell line derived from chorionic villi cells of a fetus with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In this paper, we reported the generation of ZZUi008-A, an induced pluripotent stem cell(i. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (VRFi001-A) from orbital adipose tissue of a bilateral retinoblastoma patient with heterozygous RB1 gene deletion. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We have generated induced pluripotent stem cell line VRFi001-A from a bilateral retinoblastoma pa. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Induction of pluripotent stem cells by reprogramming human ocular fibroblasts under xeno-free conditions. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To develop an efficient and xeno-free standard eye-derived induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming protocol for use during induced pluripotent stem cell-based cell therapies in treating retinal de. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In order to study the transplantation effect of hematopoetic stem cells from beta-thalassemia induced pluripotent stem cells. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells potentially may be useful in the future as an unlimited source of cells for transplantation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • (bioportfolio.com)
  • Procedures used for the induction of CELLULAR REPROGRAMMING to change the terminal phenotype of a cell, such as the generation of INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS from differentiated adult cells by the forced expression of specific genes. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The malignant stem cells of TERATOCARCINOMAS, which resemble pluripotent stem cells of the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS. The EC cells can be grown in vitro, and experimentally induced to differentiate. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Clofarabine and Low Dose Total Body Irradiation as a Preparative Regimen for Stem Cell Transplant in Leukemia. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bortezomib when given together with melphalan, and total-body irradiation before stem cell transplant and to see how well it. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Single Dose Daily Fractionated Is Not Inferior To Twice A Day Fractionated Total Body Irradiation Prior To Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation For Acute Leukemia: A Useful Practice Simplification Resulting From The Sarasin Study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Total body irradiation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation during early childhood is associated with the risk for diabetes mellitus. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for life-threatening malignancies and related diseases. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Long-term thyroid disorders in pediatric survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy-only conditioning. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Thyroid dysfunction (TD) was usually described in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients who were given total body irradiation (TBI) in the conditioning regimen. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This process instructs fully specialized adult cells how to turn into stem cells that can guide the formation of any tissue type. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • Moreover, because scientists can create reprogrammed cells from adult tissue, the technologies come without the controversy that accompanies methods based on embryonic stem cells. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • The resulting zygote can give rise to embryonic stem cells, a partially developed animal (tadpole or fetus), or a fertile adult. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • NBC News ] Researchers say they have made powerful stem cells from both young and old adults using cloning techniques, and also found clues about why it is so difficult to do this with human beings. (bioethics.net)
  • The team, at Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology and the Institute for Stem Cell Research in Los Angeles, say they used the cloning methods to create the stem cells to match a 35-year-old man and a 75-year-old man. (bioethics.net)
  • If verified, it would be only the second confirmed time someone's been able to use cloning methods to make human embryonic stem cells, considered the body's master cells. (bioethics.net)
  • Therapeutic cloning has long been envisioned as a means for generating patient-specific stem cells that could be used to treat a range of age-related diseases," said Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer for Advanced Cell Technology. (bioethics.net)
  • When human embryonic stem cells were first discovered in 1998, scientists immediately dreamed of using cloning technology to help people grow their own organ and tissue transplants, and to use them to study disease. (bioethics.net)
  • This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged Beginning of Life Matters and Reproductive Technologies , biotechnology , Genetic Testing and Privacy Issues , genomics , Stem Cells and Cloning , syndicated , World News - Home , World News - News . (bioethics.net)
  • The stem cells produced can be used to study genetic diseases, test treatments and create tissues (and organs? (abpischools.org.uk)
  • Yet a subset of cancer types have been reprogrammed to pluripotency or near‐pluripotency by blastocyst injection, by somatic cell nuclear transfer and by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology. (embopress.org)
  • Do you think that cloning and our understanding of stem cells will directly influence human health? (biologists.org)
  • Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis shows that the transcriptional reprogramming of pluripotency genes, such as Sox2 and Oct4, takes place in transplanted nuclei from C3H10T1/2 cells and from newly differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Work on stem cells, the body's mother cells that can develop into any kind of tissue, may herald a medical revolution. (pearltrees.com)
  • As to Mr. Stem cell breakthrough could reopen clone wars - opinion - 29 January 2014. (pearltrees.com)
  • In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. (pnas.org)
  • Although the transferred nucleus isn't adequately reprogrammed to make an animal, it can be tested to see if it functions well enough to make a line of stem cells. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Oocytes
  • Once meiosis resumes, oocytes complete MI and undergo an asymmetric cell division, arresting again at metaphase of MII. (jove.com)
  • To assess ploidy, we describe our conditions for in vitro maturation of oocytes to MII eggs. (jove.com)
  • There, Illmensee worked with Beatrice Mintz to manipulate the unfertilized eggs (oocytes) of mice. (asu.edu)
  • genes
  • This advance established that cells retain all of their genes as they specialize and that fully developed cells can be re-set to an embryonic state - controversial discoveries at the time. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • in the other, cells retain their complete collection of genes, but turn them on and off as needed. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • Although each of these cells has the same genetic material, each cell can only access the genes needed for its particular function. (dnalc.org)
  • The question is whether or not the progressive specialization of cells during development is accompanied by the loss of genes no longer required in each cell type. (scientificamerican.com)
  • For example, does an intestine-cell nucleus retain the genes needed for the synthesis of hemoglobin, the protein characteristic of red blood cells, and a nerve-cell nucleus the genes needed for making myosin, a protein characteristic of muscle cells? (scientificamerican.com)
  • If unwanted genes are lost, the possibility exists that it is the progressive loss of different genes that itself determines the specialization of cells, as August Weismann originally proposed in 1892. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The clearest alternative is that all genes are retained in all cells and that the genes are inactive in those cells in which they are not required. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Previous studies have identified genes preferentially expressed in the blastema tissues in various animals, but transcriptome analysis of the isolated proliferating blastema cells has not yet been reported. (jove.com)
  • Russian Blue, Cat]), and replacing the eggs nucleus with the genes/DNA form the animals being cloned, and putting the eggs back into the female, which then, over time is pumped with hormonal injections to get pregnancy faster (I think), and then gives birth to the baby clone. (sd43.bc.ca)
  • Genes can be taken from organisms and linked to other DNA molecules to form recombinant DNA and introduced into living cells. (powerofthegene.com)
  • Any human proteins in these hybrid cells thus had to be produced by genes located on one of the remaining human chromosomes. (powerofthegene.com)
  • Rana
  • The only previous work of this kind had been done with an American frog called Rana pipiens , which has the disadvantage that it only lays eggs for one or two months each year, usually in March or April. (biologists.org)
  • SCNT
  • Hans Spemann , who taught zoology at the University of Freiburg in Freiburg, Germany, theorized about SCNT in his 1938 book Embryonic Development and Induction . (asu.edu)
  • As illustrated below, basic research regarding the biological mechanisms of SCNT has led to scientific advances in the areas of reprogramming, cell fate determination, and epigenetic regulation during development. (pnas.org)
  • blastula
  • In the Amphibia the cells of choice for this purpose are those of the late blastula. (pnas.org)
  • A blastula or early gastrula (St. 8 to 10, Shumway 11 ), placed in the same dish, is then opened up and one of the subsurface animal pole cells is dissected free from its neighbors. (pnas.org)
  • divide
  • After conception, the zygote (fertilized egg) is allowed to divide and nutrients are added to promote cell division. (essaypride.com)
  • Within a day the fused cells began to divide in the culture dish. (docplayer.net)
  • Leonard Hayflick in the US during the early 1960s showed that normal populations of embryonic cells divide a finite number of times. (asu.edu)
  • In their experiments, Illmensee and Hoppe removed one of the pronuclei from the fertilized mouse egg and placed the egg in a liquid that included ingredients to encourage the pronucleus to divide (cytochlasin B). The single pronucleus remaining in the egg then created a copy of itself, meaning the egg had the correct amount of genetic material required for development. (asu.edu)
  • As the zygote and its daughter cells divide, they start to become specialized, meaning they begin to take on characteristic structures and functions that will be needed in the adult plant or animal. (scienceclarified.com)
  • early
  • Early studies in frog cloning provided some of the first experimental evidence for reprogramming. (sciencemag.org)
  • The ability to study live cells as they progress through the stages of cancer provides the opportunity to discover dynamic networks underlying pathology, markers of early stages, and ways to assess therapeutics. (embopress.org)
  • Diverse studies show that reprogrammed cancer cells can, in some cases, exhibit early‐stage phenotypes reflective of only partial expression of the cancer genome. (embopress.org)
  • In one case, reprogrammed human pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to recapitulate stages of cancer progression, from early to late stages, thus providing a model for studying pancreatic cancer development in human cells where previously such could only be discerned from mouse models. (embopress.org)
  • In these contexts, tumors inevitably arise that resemble the parental tumor state from which the cells were derived and do not undergo early‐stage progression (Tentler et al , 2012 ). (embopress.org)
  • The early egg was not formed. (stanford.edu)
  • Prior to 1996, it was thought that cloning an entire animal could only be done with embryonic cells - cells present in the early stages of an organism's development. (dnalc.org)
  • Studies in amphibians, rabbits, and mice suggested that the very early cleavage stages (two-cell to four-cell) were flexible and that each blastomere could yield a viable blastocyst. (pnas.org)
  • sheep
  • A year earlier, the team had produced twin sheep, named Megan and Morag, by cloning cultured embryonic cells in an effort spearheaded by Roslin developmental biologist Keith Campbell. (scientificamerican.com)
  • It seems it is much harder to clone a human being than it is to clone a sheep, a frog or a mouse. (bioethics.net)
  • For instance, in a sheep, udder cells could generate other udder cells, but not an entire sheep. (dnalc.org)
  • An egg cell was taken from another sheep. (dnalc.org)
  • These fused egg cells were then inserted into several different sheep. (dnalc.org)
  • transplant
  • This was important, because if you transplant a nucleus and get a normal animal out of it, you really want to prove beyond doubt that the animal has come from the transplanted nucleus and not from the resident egg nucleus, which, occasionally, might not have been removed. (biologists.org)
  • clone
  • She is a clone of these udder cells. (dnalc.org)
  • A laboratory in Hawaii run by Dr. Ryuzo Yanagimachi was the second group to successfully clone an animal from an adult cell. (dnalc.org)
  • First, the cells used to clone the mice were not grown in culture, but instead were used immediately. (dnalc.org)
  • cows have also been cloned using ovary and cumulus cells with the same method that was used to clone Dolly. (dnalc.org)
  • All attempts to clone mouse cells from adults have failed. (probe.org)
  • Ryuzo Yanagimachi, Tony Perry, and Teruhiko Wakayama clone 50 mice form adult cells, 2. (sd43.bc.ca)
  • genome
  • If so, a nucleus from a fully differentiated cell retains a complete genome, capable of directing all types of specialization. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • The scientific team, led by Roslin embryologist Ian Wilmut, reasoned that the best way to make these changes would be to tweak the genome of a cell in culture and then transfer the nucleus to a new cell. (scientificamerican.com)
  • lamb
  • Cloning of Animals On Sunday, February 23, 1997, Scottish researchers broke one of nature's greatest laws by cloning a lamb from a single cell of an adult ewe. (essaypride.com)
  • Of the 277 fused cells, only one progressed to form a developed lamb. (dnalc.org)
  • species
  • Continuing their collaboration, Illmensee and Hoppe began to create hybrid cells, cells that contained gentic material from two different species. (asu.edu)
  • they take some eggs out of a female animal, (of the same species and types [ex. (sd43.bc.ca)
  • Even in species like cattle, where cloning has become routine, only 4 percent of eggs that have received a transplanted nucleus survive. (discovermagazine.com)
  • rejection
  • This study is being done to learn whether a new method to prevent rejection between the donor immune system and the patient's body is effective. (bioportfolio.com)
  • There is no risk of immune rejection if the cells are re-implanted in patients. (abpischools.org.uk)
  • She is not concerned about tissue incompatibility and rejection, because these cells are her own genetically reprogrammed skin cells. (docplayer.net)
  • cytoplasm
  • Until this technique was developed the only kind of nucleus that could be made to penetrate an egg was the nucleus of a sperm cell, and this was obviously of limited use for an analysis of those interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm that lead to the majority of cell differences in an individual. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The egg cytoplasm when normally nucleated is of course, capable of giving rise to the complete range of differentiated cell types, while in the absence of the nucleus it may cleave but fails completely to differentiate. (pnas.org)
  • intestinal
  • Having followed that lineage, it made sense to go on to the intestinal epithelium, which is what the endoderm cells go on to form. (biologists.org)
  • mice
  • They cloned mice using cumulus cells, a cell type found in the ovaries. (dnalc.org)
  • The offspring of those mice were called mosaic mice, as they inherited traits from both the cancer cells and normal cells. (asu.edu)
  • Offspring of mosaic mice also inherited cancerous cells, thought the mice did not develop cancer. (asu.edu)
  • Mice created with rat - mouse hybrid cells produced proteins found in rats. (asu.edu)
  • Cloning
  • A process known as gene cloning, uses the host cell to make many copies of the inserted gene and the protein it codes for. (powerofthegene.com)