Loading...
  • embryo
  • Blastomeres of the early mouse embryo are thought to be equivalent in their developmental properties at least until the eight-cell stage. (biologists.org)
  • In conclusion, this study shows that while all four-cell blastomeres can have full developmental potential, they differ in their individual developmental properties according to their origin in the embryo from as early as the four-cell stage. (biologists.org)
  • Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the embryo and are pluripotent, thus possessing the capability of developing into any organ or tissue type or, at least potentially, into a complete embryo. (google.es)
  • Thus
  • Thus, in embryos dividing in this way, the progeny of the earlier meridionally dividing cell contribute predominantly to the embryonic part of the blastocyst. (biologists.org)
  • human
  • In a particularly advantageous embodiment, the cells of the preparation are human embryonic stem cells, have normal karyotypes, and continue to proliferate in an undifferentiated state after continuous culture for eleven months. (google.es)
  • mouse
  • We have therefore readdressed this issue having defined cell lineages in mouse embryos undergoing different patterns of cleavage in their second division cycle. (biologists.org)
  • One of the seminal achievements of mammalian embryology of the last decade is the routine insertion of specific genes into the mouse genome through the use of mouse ES cells. (google.es)
  • Mouse ES cells are undifferentiated, pluripotent cells derived in vitro from preimplantation embryos (Evans, at al. (google.es)
  • Mouse ES cells maintain an undifferentiated state through serial passages when cultured in the presence of fibroblast feeder layers in the presence of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) (Williams, et al. (google.es)
  • If LIF is removed, mouse ES cells differentiate. (google.es)
  • Mouse ES cells cultured in non-attaching conditions aggregate and differentiate into simple embryoid bodies, with an outer layer of endoderm and an inner core of primitive ectoderm. (google.es)
  • stem cell lines
  • Similarly, a "parthenote" (derived entirely from one parent) that does not have the potential to develop into a person might be a source of cell lines with potential comparable to that of embryonic stem cell lines. (yale.edu)
  • germ
  • Normally a female germ cell begins to divide when it has about 150 cells - at this point stem cells can be harvested. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The SCNT-hES-1 cells displayed typical ES cell morphology and cell surface markers and were capable of differentiating into embryoid bodies in vitro and of forming teratomas in vivo containing cell derivatives from all three embryonic germ layers in severe combined immunodeficient mice. (sciencemag.org)
  • Orthologs of Oct-4 exist in humans and several other species including: Oct-4 contains the following protein domains: Oct-4 has been implicated in tumorigenesis of adult germ cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vertebrates, a special population of embryonic cells called the neural crest has been proposed as a "fourth germ layer", and is thought to have been an important novelty in the evolution of head structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • During organogenesis, molecular and cellular interactions between germ layers, combined with the cells' developmental potential, or competence to respond, prompt the further differentiation of organ-specific cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of embryonic and foetal cells from all germ layers in the amniotic fluid was gradually determined since the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2007, it was confirmed that the amniotic fluid contains a heterogeneous mixture of multipotent cells after it was demonstrated that they were able to differentiate into cells from all three germ layers but they could not form teratomas following implantation into immunodeficient mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • pluripotency
  • Such a technology would not only provide an ethically acceptable alternative to research cloning, but it would also offer a method to interrogate the biological basis of "sternness," the constellation of gene expression and protein signaling that underlie self-renewal and pluripotency. (yale.edu)
  • A landmark study published in 2006 and many subsequent reports demonstrate that the reactivation of a handful of particular genes can "reprogram" a differentiated cell from a variety of rodent and human tissues into a cell with several properties of embryonic stem cells, including self renewal and pluripotency. (yale.edu)
  • Mouse embryos that are Oct-4-deficient or have low expression levels of Oct-4 fail to form the inner cell mass, lose pluripotency and differentiate into trophectoderm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pluripotency of these embryonic-like stem cells remains to be fully established. (wikipedia.org)
  • They form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCNT
  • SCNT involves removing the nucleus of a donor cell and transferring it to an egg cell that has had its nucleus removed. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This is the first time that scientists have been able to use SCNT to create human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • After continuous proliferation for more than 70 passages, SCNT-hES-1 cells maintained normal karyotypes and were genetically identical to the somatic nuclear donor cells. (sciencemag.org)
  • Although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that the cells had a parthenogenetic origin, imprinting analyses support a SCNT origin of the derived human ES cells. (sciencemag.org)
  • The first study to review the long-term health outcomes of cloning, the authors found no evidence of late-onset, non-communicable diseases other than some minor examples of osteoarthritis and concluded "We could find no evidence, therefore, of a detrimental long-term effect of cloning by SCNT on the health of aged offspring among our cohort. (wikipedia.org)
  • hESCs can be generated by SCNT using dermal fibroblasts nuclei from both a middle-aged 35-year-old male and an elderly, 75-year-old male, suggesting that age-associated changes are not necessarily an impediment to SCNT-based nuclear reprogramming of human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • totipotent
  • They are classified as either totipotent (iTC), pluripotent (iPSC) or progenitor (multipotent-iMSC, also called an induced multipotent progenitor cell-iMPC) or unipotent-(iUSC) according to their developmental potential and degree of dedifferentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • He'd like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes. (wunc.org)
  • Regenerative medicine generally refers to using cells and genes to artificially create tissues and organs and then transplanting them to regenerate physiological functions in patients. (childresearch.net)
  • By culturing ES cells and manipulating the genes in their nuclei, it is possible to develop them into the necessary tissues or organs. (childresearch.net)
  • The EUCOMM program is funded by the European Union sixth R&D programme to make a library of mutant mouse embryonic stem cell clones (ES cells), to enable the mouse research community to rapidly create mutant mice with specific mutant genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of these 13000 mutant genes, 8000 mutations in mouse ES Cells are 'targeted': that is, the mutation which knocks out gene function is inserted precisely into the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 8000 genes selected for mutation in mouse ES cells were drawn from the total set of protein coding mouse genes, based on a rough metric of how easy the genes were to mutate, with the technologies present at the time the project started. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cloning is commonly used to amplify DNA fragments containing whole genes, but it can also be used to amplify any DNA sequence such as promoters, non-coding sequences and randomly fragmented DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethical issues
  • On February 24, 1997, President Bill Clinton gave the NBAC 90 days to advise him on ethical issues concerning the cloning of human beings (Eiseman). (scribd.com)
  • Full text of the congressional hearing discussing the ethical issues raised by stem cell research recently conducted in Seoul, South Korea. (iupui.edu)
  • The induced cells also sidestep the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells, which are often created by destroying embryos. (nytimes.com)
  • insulin-secre
  • Specifically, this refers to efforts to culture, for example, skin for the treatment of burns, cornea for cataracts, myocardial cells for myocardial disorders, bone and cartilage for motor disorders, neurocytes for neurological disorders, insulin-secreting cells for diabetes, among others. (childresearch.net)
  • tissue
  • Adult tissue , i.e. adult stem cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Scientists have for the first time turned adult human skin cells into stem cells , which can grow into any type of tissue in the body, using cloning techniques. (stem-cells-news.com)
  • Scientists have finally succeeded in using cloning to create human embryonic stem cells, a step toward developing replacement tissue to treat diseases but one that might also hasten the day when it will be possible to create cloned babies. (nytimes.com)
  • That raises the hope that one day the cells will be turned into replacement tissue or even replacement organs to treat a host of diseases. (nytimes.com)
  • The gene can be later knocked out (inactivated) at a specific time-point or tissue-type in mutant mice derived from the mutant ES Cells, by appropriate breeding to other transgenic mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • During gastrulation the cells of the blastula undergo coordinated processes of cell division, invasion, and/or migration to form two (diploblastic) or three (triploblastic) tissue layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • After injury, mature terminally differentiated kidney cells dedifferentiate into more primordial versions of themselves and then differentiate into the cell types needing replacement in the damaged tissue Macrophages can self-renew by local proliferation of mature differentiated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In newts, muscle tissue is regenerated from specialized muscle cells that dedifferentiate and forget the type of cell they had been. (wikipedia.org)
  • world's
  • On November 2015, a Chinese biotech company Boyalife Group announced that it will partner with Hwang's laboratory, Sooam Biotech, to open the world's largest animal cloning factory in Tianjin as early as 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • It was later deterimined that only two of these four factors, Oct4 and Klf4 were sufficient to reprogram mouse adult neural stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although those cells which expressed the markers were able to differentiate into muscle, adipogenic, osteogenic, nephrogenic, neural and endothelial cells, this did not necessarily occur from a homogenous population of undifferentiated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • One example is the transformation of iris cells to lens cells in the process of maturation and transformation of retinal pigment epithelium cells into the neural retina during regeneration in adult newt eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • transplantation
  • Parkinsons, Alzheimers, diabetes and other degenerative diseases could be treated with cell transplantation of new and healthy cells. (ung.si)
  • Dolly's
  • Dolly's birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern - along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases. (wunc.org)
  • The funding for Dolly's cloning was provided by PPL Therapeutics and the UK's Ministry of Agriculture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some in the press speculated that a contributing factor to Dolly's death was that she could have been born with a genetic age of six years, the same age as the sheep from which she was cloned. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people - not just cells from infants - to create therapies for adult diseases. (wunc.org)
  • Such stem cells can regenerate and replace those damaged cells and tissues and alleviate diseases that affect millions of people. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • experiments
  • At present, experiments have succeeded in generating different tissues and organs by exposing ES cells to activin, a particular protein molecule that is secreted from this area. (childresearch.net)
  • In in-vitro experiments of murine Embryonic Stem Cells, Oct-4 has often been used as a marker of stemness, as differentiated cells show reduced expression of this marker. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was a professor of theriogenology and biotechnology at Seoul National University (dismissed on March 20, 2006) who became infamous for fabricating a series of experiments, which appeared in high-profile journals, in the field of stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shortly after that his human cloning experiments were revealed to be fraudulent. (wikipedia.org)
  • generate
  • Dr. Mitalipov said the technique was efficient enough that one donation - which can include multiple eggs - would probably be enough to generate a stem cell line, even accounting for failures. (nytimes.com)
  • The Potential of Stem Cells It may become possible to generate healthy heart muscle cells in the laboratory and then transplant those cells into patients with chronic heart disease. (slidesfinder.com)
  • The European Conditional Mouse Mutagenesis Program or EUCOMM is an EU-funded program to generate a library of mutant mouse embryonic stem cells for research purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of nontumorigenic stem cells display the ability to generate multiple cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • nuclear
  • Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep's egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. (wunc.org)
  • Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell , they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. (wunc.org)
  • The reprogramming process that cells need to go through during cloning is not perfect and embryos produced by nuclear transfer often show abnormal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryonic-like stem cells were originally identified using markers common to embryonic stem cells such as nuclear Oct4, CD34, vimentin, alkaline phosphatase, stem cell factor and c-Kit. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • Even in the Petri dish, the fertilized egg created through in vitro fertilization continues to divide, with the number of cells doubling quickly. (childresearch.net)
  • progenitor
  • Haematopoietic progenitor cells were first reported to be present in the amniotic fluid in 1993, specifically up to the 12th week of pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientists
  • In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients - just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors. (wunc.org)
  • Scientists in Oregon recently created patient-specific embryonic stem cells through cloning, an achievement that brings with it a number of ethical considerations. (utsw.edu)
  • research
  • ban all federal funding for cloning research as well as asking for a temporary voluntary moratorium on cloning research by private institutions until more could be learned about the issue. (scribd.com)
  • The main argument for why cloning research should be continued is the possible benefits it can have. (scribd.com)
  • In an interview with NPR, Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children's Research Institute at UT Southwestern, joined other stem cell biology experts in discussing the research's implications. (utsw.edu)
  • Now, a team at the Research Institute for Stem Cell Research at CHA Health Systems in Los Angeles and the University of Seoul said they have achieved the same result with two adult males, 'The Telegraph' reported. (stem-cells-news.com)
  • So if you can't do this with adult cells it is of limited value," said Robert Lanza , co-author of the research published in the journal Cell Stem Cell . (stem-cells-news.com)
  • Human cloning and embryonic stem cell research after Seoul. (iupui.edu)
  • Values in conflict] contains the document "Values in Conflict: Public Attitudes on Embryonic Stem Cell Research. (iupui.edu)
  • Attempts to use either type of cell for therapy remain at the early stages of research, so it is not clear which will turn out to be better. (nytimes.com)
  • To all: This week two bills regarding human embryonic stem cell research and human cloning are likely to receive committee and floor action. (aproundtable.org)
  • Would prohibit state funds for embryonic stem cell research [ESCR] from tissues derived from destroying human embryos (or from induced abortions - this provision regarding abortion is already in state law). (aproundtable.org)
  • Concerns: For the first time in state law, both bills provide an express intent to encourage research on human embryonic stem cells (even though it is limited to the federal registry). (aproundtable.org)
  • SB 210 is even less restrictive, because it would encourage human cloning research with private funds. (aproundtable.org)
  • But the stem cell research component was introduced at the end of September and came specifically from negotiations with Ohio Right to Life as a trade off to stand down on Issue 1. (aproundtable.org)
  • What are the goals of stem cell research? (slidesfinder.com)
  • One of Culver's first initiatives was to sign legislation easing limits on types of stem cell research in Iowa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Culver proposed spending $12.5 million to establish a stem cell research center at the University of Iowa. (wikipedia.org)
  • He's been an outspoken proponent of the Catholic Church's positions in opposition to human cloning and embryonic stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • On May 12, 2006, Hwang was charged with embezzlement and bioethics law violations after it emerged much of his stem cell research had been faked. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Korea Times reported on June 10, 2007, that Seoul National University fired him, and the South Korean government canceled his financial support and barred him from engaging in stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 2011, Hwang visited Libya as part of a $133 million project in the North African country to build a stem cell research center and transfer relevant technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • His alleged success was touted as the fifth instance in the world in cow cloning, with a notable caveat: Hwang failed to provide scientifically verifiable data for the research, giving only media sessions and photo-ops. (wikipedia.org)
  • attempts
  • Though neither of these attempts were successful, both show that attempts on human cloning will still occur as long as there is no worldwide legislation. (scribd.com)
  • The attempt to clone a banteng bull was more successful, as were the attempts to clone mouflon (a form of wild sheep), both resulting in viable offspring. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • The technique works by removing the nucleus from an unfertilised egg and replacing it with the nucleus of a skin cell. (stem-cells-news.com)
  • The process involves sucking out the nucleus of a somatic (body) cell and injecting it into an oocyte that has had its nucleus removed Using an approach based on the protocol outlined by Tachibana et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • They repeated the process - this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man. (wunc.org)
  • Korean
  • Hwang's next claim came only two months later in April 1999, when he announced the cloning of a Korean cow, Jin-i, also without providing any scientifically verifiable data. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • However, a number of other features are needed, and a variety of specialised cloning vectors (small piece of DNA into which a foreign DNA fragment can be inserted) exist that allow protein production, affinity tagging, single stranded RNA or DNA production and a host of other molecular biology tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • This previously unidentified progenitor occurs as a temporally discrete population during ES cell differentiation, and differs from the preceding and succeeding populations in gene expression and differentiation potential, with the unique ability to form surface ectoderm in response to BMP4 signalling. (biologists.org)
  • Research applications such as gene editing, gene expression, and directed differentiation depend on the effective, efficient delivery of DNA, RNA and/or Cas9 protein complexes into stem cells. (thermofisher.com)
  • In addition, Lipofectamine Stem reagent can be used for the transfection of mRNA for gene expression or directed differentiation studies using stem cells. (thermofisher.com)
  • in 9 days (FS) showed that the Ped candidate gene is present in FF and FS but not in 8-cell embryos. (usp.br)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is found in rod cells in the back of the eye and is essential for vision in low-light conditions. (genecards.org)
  • This discovery changed the current thinking about cancer from a model wherein cancer is caused by a foreign substance (a viral gene) to one where a gene that is normally present in the cell can cause cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other studies showed that lack of Daxx gene caused a higher apoptotic rate in embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although senescent cells can no longer replicate, they remain metabolically active and commonly adopt an immunogenic phenotype consisting of a pro-inflammatory secretome, the up-regulation of immune ligands, a pro-survival response, promiscuous gene expression (pGE) and stain positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • Mice deficient for Mxd3 show increased sensitivity of neuronal and lymphoid cells to gamma-radiation induced apoptosis. (uniprot.org)
  • The experimental elimination of senescent cells from transgenic progeroid mice and non-progeroid, naturally-aged mice led to greater resistance against aging-associated diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gli2-/- and Gli3-/- double homozygous transgenic mice are not viable and do not survive beyond embryonic level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transgenic mice over-expressing the transcription factor Gli2 under the K5 promoter in cutaneous keratinocytes develop multiple skin tumours on the ears, tail, trunk and dorsal aspect of the paw, resembling those of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). (wikipedia.org)
  • After modifying the technique, Obokata was able to show that white blood cells from newborn mice could be transformed into cells that behaved much like stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was the first in a series of development that have begun to make rats tractable as genetic research subjects, although they still lag behind mice, which lend themselves better to the embryonic stem cell techniques typically used for genetic manipulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • chromosome
  • In human fertilization, a released ovum (a haploid secondary oocyte with replicate chromosome copies) and a haploid sperm cell (male gamete)-combine to form a single 2n diploid cell called the zygote. (wikipedia.org)
  • inducible
  • This means that in these cell types long term tetracycline inducible expression can be achieved. (clontech.com)
  • When expressing the Tet-On 3G transactivator protein from the EF-1 alpha promoter, 83% of the Jurkat Tet-On 3G clones showed strong inducible expression and 33% demonstrated very high inducibility (greater than 2,000-fold). (clontech.com)
  • plasmid
  • Time-lapse phase-contrast (left) and fluorescence (right) movies of human ES cells (H9) grown in Essential 8 medium on vitronectin and transfected with 1 µL Lipofectamine Stem reagent complexed with a GFP-expression construct (500 ng total plasmid DNA). (thermofisher.com)
  • The goal of this study was to illustrate the versatility of Invitrogen Lipofectamine Stem Transfection Reagent, which was developed specifically for stem cells, to co-deliver multiple payloads in addition to large plasmid constructs with high transfection efficiency. (thermofisher.com)
  • (A) Human ES (H9) cells or Human Episomal iPSCs were transfected with Lipofectamine Stem Reagent or FuGENE HD Regent according to the accompanying protocol and either a 5 kb or 11 kb DNA plasmid expressing GFP and examined for GFP expression 24 hours posttransfection. (thermofisher.com)
  • In the bottom panel NCRM-iPS cells transfected using Lipofectamine Stem Reagent with a ~10.5 kb plasmid expressing Cas9 and GFP followed by detection via immunocytochemistry. (thermofisher.com)
  • heterochromatin
  • The nucleus of senescent cells is characterized by senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF) and DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence (DNA-SCARS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins
  • Gli family zinc finger proteins are mediators of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and they are implicated as potent oncogenes in the embryonal carcinoma cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the field of molecular biology, nuclear receptors are a class of proteins found within cells that are responsible for sensing steroid and thyroid hormones and certain other molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • TGF-β regulates a variety of different cellular developmental processes including growth, differentiation, proliferation, and cell death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular senescence is the phenomenon by which normal diploid cells cease to divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, cellular senescence represents a change in "cell state" rather than a cell becoming "aged" as the name confusingly suggests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consistent with this, telomerase-immortalised cells continued to age (according to the epigenetic clock) without having been treated with any senescence inducers or DNA-damaging agents, re-affirming the independence of the process of epigenetic ageing from telomeres, cellular senescence, and the DNA damage response pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or mDNA) is the DNA located in mitochondria, cellular organelles within eukaryotic cells that convert chemical energy from food into a form that cells can use, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells are cells found in most, if not all, multi-cellular organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • eukaryotic cell
  • A zygote (from Greek ζυγωτός zygōtos "joined" or "yoked", from ζυγοῦν zygoun "to join" or "to yoke") is a eukaryotic cell formed by a fertilization event between two gametes. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryos
  • Thus, in X. laevis embryos, the ectoderm is patterned by the secretion of BMP antagonists from the dorsal blastopore lip, or Spemann's organizer: BMP signalling is active ventrally, and induces the formation of surface ectoderm, whereas dorsal BMP signalling is inhibited, and the cells adopt a neural fate ( Hemmati-Brivanlou and Melton, 1997 ). (biologists.org)
  • STAP cells injected into mouse embryos grew into a variety of tissues and organs found throughout the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Belgium bans reproductive cloning but allows therapeutic cloning of embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Italy has a 2004 law that forbids all sperm or egg donations and the freezing of embryos, but allows, in effect, using existing stem cell lines that have been imported. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2003, Spain's laws state that embryos left over from IVF and donated by the couple that created them can be used in research, including ES cell research, if they have been frozen for more than five years. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • of TRPC decreased the cell routine S stage and cell migration, implicating an operating function for TRP-mediated Ca2+ entrance in cell proliferation and invasion. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Exogenous PUFA and a TRPC3 antagonist regularly attenuated breasts cancer tumor cell proliferation and migration, recommending a mechanism where PUFA restrains the breasts cancer partially via its inhibition of TRPC stations. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Ca2+ entrance via turned on TRPC was improved when PUFA had been absent, recommending a double-gating system for Danshensu TRPC which may be involved with MCF breasts cancer tumor cell proliferation and invasion. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Lipofectamine Stem reagent can be used to transfect a wide range of stem cell types with superior efficiency while supporting continued proliferation without inducing differentiation. (thermofisher.com)
  • Invitrogen
  • MCF-7 cells had Danshensu been passaged onto coverslips in 500 l Opti-MEM (Invitrogen) 1 day before transfection and reached about 40C50% confluence during transfection. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Designed for dramatically improved transfection efficiency, Invitrogen Lipofectamine Stem Transfection Reagent offers a simple, robust and reproducible method for delivering DNA, RNA and RNP such as Cas9/gRNA complexes into a wide range of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells, neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells (Figure 2) . (thermofisher.com)
  • Human
  • (B) Human ES (H9) cells were transfected with Lipofectamine Stem Reagent or FuGENE HD Reagent according to the protocol with an mRNA expressing GFP. (thermofisher.com)
  • After DNMT1 knockout in human cancer cells, these cells were found to retain their inherited methylation pattern, which suggests maintenance activity by the expressed DNMT3s. (wikipedia.org)
  • diploid
  • The result of karyogamy is the formation of a diploid cell called zygote or zygospore. (wikipedia.org)
  • After approximately 30 hours from the time of fertilization, fusion of the pronuclei and immediate mitotic division produce two 2n diploid daughter cells called blastomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • sperm
  • In seedless plants, the archegonium is usually flask-shaped, with a long hollow neck through which the sperm cell enters. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • C, left) Lipofectamine Stem Reagent was used to transfect cells with Cas9 mRNA (modified)/ gRNA: Emx-1 crRNA (Exon2)-tracrRNA oligo/ GFP mRNA (modified) or Cas9 protein/gRNA: Emx-1 crRNA (Exon2)-tracrRNA oligo/ GFP mRNA (modified). (thermofisher.com)
  • Alkaline phosphatase in E. coli is located in the periplasmic space and can thus be released using techniques that weaken the cell wall and release the protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • viability
  • This newest addition to the Lipofectamine transfection reagent family helps ensure high-efficiency transfection while maintaining maximum cell viability and growth in an undifferentiated state. (thermofisher.com)
  • Required for photoreceptor cell viability after birth. (genecards.org)
  • stem cell res
  • All of these attributes make this versatile reagent an ideal addition to your stem cell research tool kit and a readily accessible alternative to electroporation. (thermofisher.com)
  • The European Union has yet to issue consistent regulations with respect to stem cell research in member states. (wikipedia.org)
  • Germany has restrictive policies for stem cell research, but a 2008 law authorizes "the use of imported stem cell lines produced before May 1, 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United Kingdom is one of the leaders in stem cell research, in the opinion of Lord Sainsbury, Science and Innovation Minister for the UK. (wikipedia.org)
  • A new £10 million stem cell research centre has been announced at the University of Cambridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • divisions
  • In normal circumstances, absent telomerase, if a cell divides recursively, at some point the progeny reach their Hayflick limit, which is believed to be between 50-70 cell divisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • oncogenes
  • Cells can also be induced to senesce via DNA damage in response to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of oncogenes and cell-cell fusion, independent of telomere length. (wikipedia.org)
  • mitosis
  • This cell may then enter meiosis or mitosis depending on the life cycle of the species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telomerase replaces short bits of DNA known as telomeres, which are otherwise shortened when a cell divides via mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • In Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), alkaline phosphatase is located in the periplasmic space, external to the inner cell membrane and within the peptidoglycan portion of the cell wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluorescence
  • Adjustments in the Ca2+ focus had been indicated as F/F, where F was the fluorescence strength when cells had been at rest, and F was the modification in fluorescence during excitement. (cancercurehere.com)
  • subsequently
  • The technique for producing STAP cells was subsequently studied by Obokata at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), while she was studying as a post doc under Charles Vacanti, and then at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • Within this research, we discovered the functional appearance of TRPC3 in individual MCF-7 breasts cancer tumor cell-mediated Ca2+ entrance. (cancercurehere.com)
  • found
  • This partnership is found mainly in the S-phase of the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • On August 5, 2014, Yoshiki Sasai-Obokata's supervisor at RIKEN and one of the coauthors on the STAP cell papers-was found dead at a RIKEN facility after an apparent suicide by hanging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indeed, it was found that differentiation was partially rescued if Dnmt3a-/- HSCs experienced an additional Ctnb1 knockdown - Ctnb1 codes for β-catenin, which participates in self-renewal cell division. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has also been found that DNMT3A-mutated cell lines exhibit transcriptome instability, in that they have much more erroneous RNA splicing as compared to their isogenic[disambiguation needed] wildtype counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • reagent
  • Cell routine evaluation After removal of methanol, cells had been treated having a Coulter DNA-Prep reagent package (Beckman-Coulter, France). (cancercurehere.com)