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  • Lanza
  • In 2006, Lanza said this method would preserve the remaining embryo in a viable state. (sfgate.com)
  • At that blastocyst stage, embryos are routinely implanted in the uterus at in vitro fertilization clinics, Lanza said. (sfgate.com)
  • But Lanza has not necessarily proved that the procedure inflicts no harm on the embryos, she said. (sfgate.com)
  • Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, "so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want," Lanza says. (wunc.org)
  • viable
  • However, other people believe that human life does not begin until the fetus is viable (it has at least even chances of surviving outside the womb), usually before about 6 months prenatal. (jiskha.com)
  • They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. (wunc.org)
  • Dr. Matthew Smalley , a senior lecturer at Cardiff University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute who was not involved in the study, told Lopatto the research "holds out real promise for a viable alternative approach to human organ transplants. (redorbit.com)
  • diseases
  • To develop the stem cells, Dr. Daley and colleagues essentially reprogrammed skin fibroblasts or marrow-derived mesenchymal cells from patients with the 10 diseases. (medpagetoday.com)
  • He said the new cell lines "are in some ways broader and more important [than embryonic stem cells] in that they represent a collection of degenerative diseases for which there are no good treatments and, more importantly, no good animal models. (medpagetoday.com)
  • RP encompasses a group of inherited eye diseases that cause progressive loss of photoreceptor cells, specialized neurons found in the retina. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Stem cells, sort of all-purpose cells that briefly appear in new embryos, hold the promise of aiding research into now incurable diseases and tantalizing new medical treatments, like growing replacement tissues for patients. (nytimes.com)
  • Stem cells may open the door to discoveries about many diseases and may allow treatments for diseases to be developed. (jiskha.com)
  • BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. has announced that based on studies conducted to date, the Company's adult stem cell therapies provide a safer approach at curing and treating neurodegenerative diseases than competitive therapies that rely on embryonic stem cells. (technologynetworks.com)
  • The scientific evidence is overwhelming and decisive: use of embryonic stem cells is completely unnecessary since use of adult stem cells has proven to be the most promising in treating various diseases (see Thompson and Harrub , 2001). (apologeticspress.org)
  • laboratory
  • Five of the new embryos grew in laboratory dishes to the stage that fertility doctors consider ready for transfer to a woman's womb: a degree of development that clones of adult humans have never achieved before. (kateva.org)
  • In vitro fertilization (IVF) is the process of fertilising an egg with a sperm in the laboratory to produce an embryo. (ivf.net)
  • breakthrough
  • His mouse finding was hailed as a breakthrough because it offered a possible way around the thorny moral issues that have slowed the study of stem cells. (nytimes.com)
  • It is well known that nearly a decade has passed from the embryonic stem cell breakthrough, and still, a therapy based on such cells is not yet close to the market. (technologynetworks.com)
  • We are fortunate he has chosen to continue his breakthrough research on stem cells at the Morgridge Institute as the first member of our interdisciplinary scientific team. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Just when all seemed lost, there was a breakthrough in stem cell research. (geek.com)
  • epigenetic
  • These ' epigenetic ' changes commit the cells to increasingly specialised fates and ensures that development is an ordered, timely process. (wordpress.com)
  • The cells also showed evidence of epigenetic reprogramming - a process that occurs during embryo development in which the DNA is reset during each generation. (ivf.net)
  • Kyoto University
  • When I saw the embryo, I suddenly realized there was such a small difference between it and my daughters," said Dr. Yamanaka, 45, a father of two and now a professor at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University. (nytimes.com)
  • In November 2007, two research groups, one at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and another at Kyoto University in Japan, announced that they had succeeded in directly reprogramming human skin cells into stem cells. (opposingviews.com)
  • neurons
  • As a final proof of their 'stemness', Takahashi and co. successfully coaxed the induced stem cells into producing neurons and heart muscle cells. (wordpress.com)
  • However, the team has issues getting these cells through all the developmental stages to become adult neurons. (geek.com)
  • Using fibroblasts from mice and humans, the team evaluated all the developmental steps involved to make their pain sensing neurons. (geek.com)
  • Patients with chronic neuropathic pain donated fibroblasts for this study, and the neurons created from those cells ended up with the same neuropathies and hypersensitivity seen in the patients' own neurons. (geek.com)
  • Other teams are sure to begin duplicating this research to better understand human disease, and it will be invaluable to analyze pain sensing neurons outside the body. (geek.com)
  • uterus
  • The embryo grows for a few days in an incubator before being transferred into the uterus. (ivf.net)
  • make
  • Actually the nice thing about this is that if you had some genetic disease(like cystic fibrosis) you could take the genetic material out of one of your skin cells, correct it, and then use that with this process to make an embryo. (slashdot.org)
  • The closely held company hopes to make embryos that are clones, or genetic twins, of patients, then harvest stem cells from those embryos and grow them into replacement tissues. (kateva.org)
  • She said Advanced Cell should prepare a package of evidence and make a formal presentation to the NIH. (sfgate.com)
  • Thomson predicts that within the next ten years, "We'll be able to make all clinically relevant cells in the body. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The key was the discovery of new transcription factors that cause cells to produce different proteins-essentially flipping on different parts of the genome that make it a neuron. (geek.com)
  • Parkinson's
  • In addition to Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease, the new stem cell lines model type 1 diabetes, severe combined immunodeficiency, Gaucher's disease (type 3), Duchenne muscular deficiency, Becker muscular deficiency, Swachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, Huntington's disease, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (carrier). (medpagetoday.com)
  • Within their membranes lies the potential to understand how we develop, test new drugs and most importantly, provide replacement cells to treat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, stroke and more. (wordpress.com)
  • grew
  • When they did so, Sample said, they were surprised to find the cells "arranged themselves into a ball as they grew, mimicking the earliest stages of liver growth in a human embryo. (redorbit.com)
  • The clumps of cells grew rapidly for two months, at which stage they measured around five millimeters across. (redorbit.com)
  • successfully
  • But his team was the first to successfully do so in humans, said Dirk de Rooij, emeritus professor of endocrinology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, who recently wrote a review on reprogramming mouse spermatogonial stem cells. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Company's
  • A Bush administration official said Advanced Cell's new study delivered "a very significant scientific advance," but did not guarantee inclusion of the company's stem cells on the narrow registry of cells approved for federally funded research. (sfgate.com)
  • mice
  • The cells were administered, via injection directly underneath the retina, when the mice were five days old. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Yamanaka gained scientific notice in 2006 by reporting that direct reprogramming in mice had produced cells resembling embryonic stem cells, although with significant differences. (drugs-forum.com)
  • When injected into immune-compromised mice, they produced teratomas, a tumor that contains many different kinds of cells. (bio-medicine.org)
  • When they were transplanted into the sides of mice with weakened immune systems, they formed tumours called teratomas (literally 'monster tumour') containing a Frankenstein-like mash-up of different cell types including cartilage, gut lining, muscle, nerves and keratin. (wordpress.com)
  • California Institut
  • But the advance could ease the pressure on the Bush administration to relax the funding limits on embryo-derived stem cells, said Alan Trounson , president of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine . (sfgate.com)
  • research
  • The latter were developed without federal funds to circumvent the limitations on embryonic stem cell research imposed by President George W. Bush. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Dr. Yamanaka was an assistant professor of pharmacology doing research involving embryonic stem cells when he made the social call to the clinic about eight years ago. (nytimes.com)
  • I thought, we can't keep destroying embryos for our research. (nytimes.com)
  • The finding has been welcomed in the United States, where the federal government has refused to finance much stem cell research. (nytimes.com)
  • The public's continued support for genetic testing and research was expressed by a majority of adults (54%) who said its benefits outweigh any risks, according to Virginia Commonwealth University's annual life sciences survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Public support for non-embryonic stem cell research fell significantly from 75% in 2007 to 70% this year, according to the survey. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It is possible that opinion was a little more supportive in 2007 because the news was so fresh that non-embryonic stem cell research was a more realistic possibility," she added, referring to a November 2007 announcement that human skin cells could be used instead of embryos. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Among the key moral issues of our day is the use of embryonic stem cells in medical research. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Similar advances have been occurring all along-apparently escaping the notice of politicians and the liberal establishment that continue their campaign for embryonic stem-cell research (see Miller , 2007). (apologeticspress.org)
  • No justification exists for butchering human life on the alleged grounds that medical research to alleviate suffering necessitates it. (apologeticspress.org)
  • This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus, the delivery and stable expression of synthetic OCT4 mRNA and other synthetic mRNAs (synRNAs) may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The company, Advanced Cell Technology, is asking the White House to allow federal funding for research using its cells. (sfgate.com)
  • The Bush administration has banned federal funding for most research involving stem cells created from embryos. (sfgate.com)
  • That $3 billion stem cell funding unit resulted from a 2004 state initiative from research advocates who blamed Bush's restrictions for delays in the development of potentially life-saving treatments. (sfgate.com)
  • The problems we are addressing have become so complex that only through collaboration, and reaching across scientific disciplines, can we move research closer to making tangible improvements in human health," Thomson says. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Nevertheless, only the research and treatments based on adult stem cells are giving results. (zenit.org)
  • In 2005, California residents voted to spend $6 billion dollars to back a $3 billion dollar bond to fund stem cell research in the state. (samesexprocreation.com)
  • The New York Stem Cell Foundation, NYSCF , is a non-profit organization raising private monies to fund stem cell research in the State of New York. (samesexprocreation.com)
  • The University of Wisconsin has a Stem Cell Research Program . (samesexprocreation.com)
  • extract
  • Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant - creating a patient-specific treatment - though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells. (wunc.org)
  • In January 2008, they announce a technique to safely extract one cell from an eight-cell embryo without harming the embryo. (samesexprocreation.com)
  • Rudolf Jaenisch
  • It's a huge deal,' agreed Rudolf Jaenisch, a prominent stem cell scientist at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Mass. 'You have the proof of principle that you can do it. (drugs-forum.com)