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  • socio-political
  • Despite considerable contextual variability in local specificities of this alteration, I argue that these processes are to some extent regular, predictable, and have socio-political implications. (springer.com)
  • The regulation school can justifiably claim credit for the interpretation which associates transformations in the processes of valorisation with changes taking place in the socio-political sphere, and vice-versa. (wildcat-www.de)
  • Review
  • In the first section of this paper, I review the evidence for these processes at a global scale, showing that food-producing human populations in particular radically reorganize insular biotas. (springer.com)
  • periods
  • Like the fetal programming literature, this literature documents critical and sensitive periods in the development of human capabilities. (pnas.org)
  • outcomes
  • Evidence on the importance of early environments on a spectrum of health, labor market, and behavioral outcomes suggests that common developmental processes are at work. (pnas.org)
  • Innovation
  • The theory focuses on the crucial role played by heterogeneous interests in determining innovation policies, which are one of the keys to the growth process: the economy can be discontinuously innovation-oriented due to the different incentives of individuals and di¤erent schemes of political aggregation of preferences. (repec.org)
  • Outline Many developing nations struggle to find sustainable solutions to their medical needs including infrastructure, human capital and technology innovation, in order to provide basic medical services. (isiarticles.com)
  • capabilities
  • In response to this gap, this study will empirically examine the relationships between human capital, capabilities and competitive advantage of professional service firms in the Hong Kong, China and Taiwan regions. (scribd.com)
  • Our framework will also examine how these local and international capabilities will be affected by the moderating factors of VRIOs as perceived by their firms' CEOs.Auw evaluate the human capital and capabilities (skills) of professional service firms. (scribd.com)
  • economic development
  • This paper provides a positive theory that explains how an economy might evolve when the longevity of its citizens both influences and is influenced by the process of economic development. (repec.org)
  • The 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development ," NBER Working Papers 17216, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (repec.org)
  • Human Genetic Diversity and Comparative Economic Development ," CEPR Discussion Papers 6824, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers. (repec.org)
  • studies
  • It is because most human capital studies have focused on their impact on firm performance. (scribd.com)
  • However, previous studies on human peripheral B-lymphocytes have shown increased survival as well as proliferation upon IFN treatment. (diva-portal.org)
  • The first direction, initiated by Aglietta, studies regimes of accumulation and models of growth according to their economic determinations, and it applied its first interpretative schema to the United States. (wildcat-www.de)
  • skills
  • Cognitive and noncognitive skills, such as self-regulation, motivation, time preference, far-sightedness, adventurousness, and the like, affect the evolution of health capital through choices made by parents and children. (pnas.org)
  • people
  • The basic argument is that economies with more human capital grow faster and allow people to reach a higher per capita income. (repec.org)
  • rates
  • Steady-state income differences obey the same equation as in neoclassical theory, but since R&D is positively correlated with investment rates, capital accumulation accounts for less than estimated by neoclassical theory. (repec.org)
  • common
  • In contrast, the term subtractive manufacturing appeared as a retronym for the large family of machining processes with material removal as their common theme. (wikipedia.org)
  • evolution
  • Social capital has been used to explain the improved performance of diverse groups, the growth of entrepreneurial firms, superior managerial performance, enhanced supply chain relations, the value derived from strategic alliances, and the evolution of communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • strong
  • Uhlenbruck & Shimizu (2006) found that service firms that internationalize without strong human capital are likely to be at a competitive disadvantage. (scribd.com)
  • social
  • Social capital broadly refers to those factors of effectively functioning social groups that include such things as interpersonal relationships, a shared sense of identity , a shared understanding, shared norms , shared values , trust , cooperation , and reciprocity . (wikipedia.org)
  • The term social capital was in intermittent use from about 1890, before becoming widely used in the late 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the first half of the 19th century, Alexis de Tocqueville had observations about American life that seemed to outline and define social capital. (wikipedia.org)
  • L. J. Hanifan 's 1916 article regarding local support for rural schools is one of the first occurrences of the term social capital in reference to social cohesion and personal investment in the community. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although she did not explicitly define the term social capital , her usage referred to the value of networks. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Dewey may have made the first direct mainstream use of social capital in The School and Society in 1899, though he did not offer a definition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Germany
  • It was to make this position its own, and developed it with contributions on the state apparatus and its relations with modern and contemporary capital, in the writings of Hirsch and Roth in Germany and Jessop in Britain. (wildcat-www.de)
  • term
  • The term "3D printing" originally referred to a process that deposits a binder material onto a powder bed with inkjet printer heads layer by layer. (wikipedia.org)
  • After 12 moratoriums of organ and turning not maintained in patients, the 6th term of the Processing resource was necessitated in December 2014. (anthonyflood.com)
  • Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu used the term in 1972 in his Outline of a Theory of Practice , and clarified the term some years later in contrast to cultural , economic , and symbolic capital . (wikipedia.org)
  • general
  • These non-monotonic relations, which are polynomial in general, are determined by the base level of human capital spillover and the magnitude of the congestion e¤ect: a U shape relation can arise under low congestion factor, whereas a hump shape may present for high congestion factor. (repec.org)