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  • India's
  • During the 1980s and 1990s, corruption became associated with the occupants of the highest echelons of India's political system. (countrystudies.us)
  • The rest of the region, however, should not share Singh's optimism: India's ability to become a major Asian power is constrained by conventional and insurgent threats, resource and organizational limitations, and a chaotic domestic political scene. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • crisis
  • Its core concern is to explore notions of 'crisis' in mature democracies as voter turnouts and 'trust' in formal political institutions steadily drop, national economies struggle, and news media decline. (gold.ac.uk)
  • As the earthquake of economic crisis sweeps across the globe, the political establishment in country after country is being shaken to the core. (marxist.com)
  • At its heart, this political crisis is a reflection of the deep crisis of capitalism, which leaves no rock unturned as its tremors spread across the world. (marxist.com)
  • In country after country, the ruling class is facing a political crisis. (marxist.com)
  • That the crisis of capitalism is reflected most visibly through a political crisis, should come as no surprise - as Lenin famously remarked, politics is just concentrated economics. (marxist.com)
  • This political crisis is clear in countries such as Britain and Ireland, where long standing governments that presided over an economic boom, found themselves kicked out of office at the first possible opportunity as boom turned into bust, only to be replaced by weak coalitions. (marxist.com)
  • In the end, however, the Tories failed to achieve a majority, resulting in the first peacetime coalition government since the National Government that was formed between the three main parties in the 1930's under similar conditions of economic crisis. (marxist.com)
  • decades
  • For decades political scientists agreed that politics in New Zealand was nearly exclusively either concerned with economic issues or based around the left-right class divide. (typepad.com)
  • Since these policies began forcing legislators from office nearly two decades ago, political scientists have sought to test the claims of reformers, with particular attention to the quality of representation. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Gov. Pat McCrory on Thursday pardoned two half-brothers who were exonerated of murder after spending three decades in prison. (newsobserver.com)
  • So also with secretaries of state and defense, at least until the last few decades, when these offices have usually been held by nonpoliticians (who, of course, are bound to the president's political positions). (encyclopedia.com)
  • 1995
  • The Federation Council passed a resolution permitting Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin to reprimand the cabinet members who failed to comply with February's government resolution on aiding the farming sector with the 1995 sowing campaign, Interfax reported. (rferl.org)
  • That resolution gives the government ten days to allocate 12 trillion rubles' worth of centralized credits to the agrarian sector in the first half of 1995. (rferl.org)
  • Economics
  • After receiving his bachelor's degree from American University in Washington, DC, he went on to graduate studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he received a master's degree in Economics and a Ph.D. in Political Science. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • electoral
  • In Britain, the 2010 general election returned the first hung parliament since WWII, despite the first-past-the-post electoral system that is supposed to guarantee "strong" and "stable" governments. (marxist.com)
  • However, as the country grew in the 1800s and the Electoral College, as outlined in the Constitution, evolved into a "winner-take-all" system in which three or more strong parties would make it impossible to get to the required 270 electoral votes to win a presidential election, a two-party system emerged. (pbs.org)
  • professor of political science
  • Sen. Snowe is incredibly important in terms of what comes out from the Senate but that has to do with because she is one of the last few remaining moderates -- handful of moderates in either party," said Mark Brewer, assistant professor of political science at the University of Maine. (go.com)
  • Mack C. Shelley, II is a professor of political science and statistics at Iowa State University. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Steffen W. Schmidt is a professor of political science at Iowa State University. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • George C. Edwards III is University Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University and the Jordan Chair in Presidential Studies. (ecampus.com)
  • judiciary
  • The law provides for an independent judiciary, and the government generally respected judicial independence in practice. (state.gov)
  • opposition
  • When Mrs. Balieva said they [the Kazakh government] did everything possible to create a level playing field and equal conditions so that the opposition could compete with pro-governmental parties, that's just not true. (rferl.org)
  • There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. (pbs.org)
  • The only independent candidate in Zimbabwe's March 29th presidential election says the new deal signed between President Robert Mugabe and main opposition leaders is not an all-inclusive government as speculated. (voanews.com)
  • Makoni said with determination and commitment the government and the opposition could effectively work together. (voanews.com)
  • system
  • These social linkages have been theorised as representing a 'frozen party system' - the idea that defining moments in the history of a country produce social cleavages which become politicised, encouraging the emergence of party systems which reinforce and reproduce these cleavages. (typepad.com)
  • They argued that political parties that establish their dominance in crucial periods are often able to retain their positions in the party system even after the social cleavages change. (typepad.com)
  • Term limits would inject new blood into the political system thereby ousting special interests that bound government from implementing citizen will. (lse.ac.uk)
  • The government has an independent public defender system. (state.gov)
  • To examine the two-party political system in the United States and the effect upon it that third parties have had. (pbs.org)
  • The Founders did not intend to create a two-party system. (pbs.org)
  • constitution
  • The Kazakh government amended its constitution to add ten additional seats to the majilis -- from 67 to 77 -- and lowered the registration fee for political parties. (rferl.org)
  • This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution. (pbs.org)
  • Committee president Maria Kirbasova demanded the government allow alternative service for young men, as provided for in the constitution, and complete the transition to a professional army in the next five years. (rferl.org)
  • Parliament
  • From this moment on, class was properly part of New Zealand politics, with both sides of the class divide represented in Parliament. (typepad.com)
  • The melee in parliament was nothing but political parties trying to survive and remain relevant. (news24.com)
  • A progressive liberal party like the DA cannot dramatically march out of the parliament- that is expected from the EFF. (news24.com)
  • separatism
  • So far, Turkey's government has managed to maintain this balance by opposing separatism, defending the territorial integrity of China, at the same time investing in the economic development of Xinjiang and enunciating the need for improved social and cultural rights for the Uyghurs. (atimes.com)
  • Militant groups are now relying less on violence and more on other means like influencing viewpoints through coercion of the local media, prevailing on bar associations to file human rights abuse cases and nudging some of the political parties to carry forward the agenda of separatism. (boloji.com)
  • economic
  • That class and a basic economic cleavage underpin the way New Zealand politics is carried out has become an almost unchallenged assumption for some. (typepad.com)
  • By the 1930s then, partisan competition in New Zealand was predominately uni-dimensional - organised around economic issues and class divisions, with the result that social structure played a crucial role in determining party support. (typepad.com)
  • Leslie Lipson also noted in 1948, 'Politics in this Dominion are concerned with economic problems to the exclusion of almost all others. (typepad.com)
  • But black Malawians, seeking to improve their political, social, and economic standing in the colonized region, viewed the idea of federation as a threat to their hope of eventual independence for the territory. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Operational since 1981, the Convention requires States parties to eliminate discrimination against women in the enjoyment of all civil, political, economic and cultural rights. (un.org)
  • corruption
  • The main human rights problems reported during the year included security force use of excessive force, official corruption and impunity, and government control of the press through beatings and harassment of journalists and sometimes outright censorship. (state.gov)
  • Corruption not only has become a pervasive aspect of Indian politics but also has become an increasingly important factor in Indian elections. (countrystudies.us)
  • Other countries also have experienced corruption that has rocked their political systems. (countrystudies.us)
  • Problems were reported in the following areas: government corruption, domestic violence, trafficking in persons, and discrimination and abuse of foreign workers. (state.gov)
  • The government has effective mechanisms to investigate and punish abuse and corruption. (state.gov)
  • process
  • RFE/RL correspondent Beatrice Hogan takes a closer look at the Kazakh political process. (rferl.org)
  • After the process is begun in earnest, it will take two to three years for these state and central government forces to gain the confidence necessary to fight well-armed and well-trained terrorists who enjoy external support. (boloji.com)
  • Simply put,' says Rowles-Davies, 'litigation funding, or third party funding is the process whereby… a 'funder' that has no direct interest in a piece of litigation, pays the legal fees of one of the parties. (wn.com)
  • Have students read the PBS NewsHour article " Third Parties in the U.S. Political Process" and complete Handout #1: Third Party Obstacles. (pbs.org)
  • boost
  • However, if reformers are correct, term limits could boost turnout by increasing competitive elections and improving perceptions of government. (lse.ac.uk)
  • In order to boost student engagement with key concepts, the 2014 Elections and Updates Edition incorporates coverage of contemporary issues that dominate today's headlines, as well as the most up-to-date data. (ecampus.com)
  • controversy
  • Social and moral issues, it is true, have at times entered into the field of party warfare, but none of these has ever dominated political controversy' (Lipson, 1948: pp.196-197). (typepad.com)
  • Science
  • Barbara A. Bardes is professor emerita of political science at the University of Cincinnati. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • She served as a faculty member in political science and dean of Mundelein College at Loyola University of Chicago. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • He is a pioneer in the use of web-based and real-time video courses and is a member of the American Political Science Association's section on Computers and Multimedia. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • When he determined that he was unlikely to become shortstop for the New York Yankees, he turned to political science. (ecampus.com)
  • interest groups
  • Studies find that term limited legislatures are less experienced and knowledgeable about policy, they write less detailed legislation, are more reliant on policy information from interest groups and the executive branch, and tend to be more polarized along party lines. (lse.ac.uk)
  • and the political forces that shape American government, including elections, parties and interest groups. (crown.edu)
  • mechanisms
  • checkpoints, one expert said she was glad to find out that the Government had established mechanisms to counter the problem of human rights violations. (un.org)
  • role
  • A brief description of the legal system's historical roots, role in government, and acceptance of International Court of Justice (ICJ) jurisdiction. (nationmaster.com)
  • Internationally, people have been stunned and governments have been rattled by the invention of WikiLeaks, which has helped to play a major role in exposing the backroom deals and machinations of international "diplomacy" and foreign affairs . (marxist.com)
  • public
  • This panel on Third Party Financing of Transnational Litigation features Martin Redish , Louis and Harriet Ancel Professor of Law and Public Policy , Northwestern University School of Law and Maya Steinitz, Associate Professor of Law, University of Iowa College of Law . (wn.com)
  • Bardes has written articles on public and foreign policy, and women and politics. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • He has a B.A. from Rollins College and obtained his Ph.D. from Columbia University, New York, in public law and government. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • 6. Public Opinion and Political Socialization. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • practice
  • The law prohibits such actions, and the government generally respected these prohibitions in practice. (state.gov)
  • The law provides for freedom of speech and of the press, and the government generally respected these rights in practice. (state.gov)
  • arbitrary
  • There were no reports the government or its agents committed arbitrary or unlawful killings during the year. (state.gov)
  • There were no reports that the government or its agents committed arbitrary or unlawful killings. (state.gov)
  • The law prohibits arbitrary arrest and detention, and the government generally observed these prohibitions. (state.gov)
  • proposal
  • Under Snowe's proposal, which she first introduced in spring, insurance companies will not be able to deny coverage based on pre-existing medical conditions, and a government insurance plan will serve as a fallback if the private industry does not reform within a certain time period. (go.com)
  • social
  • Writing in 1969, Austin Mitchell had a similar conclusion, arguing, 'the social cleavage in fact dominates the political scene in unrivalled fashion. (typepad.com)
  • The indigenous peoples of Africa are those peoples from the African region whose way of life, attachment or claims to particular lands, and social and political standing in relation to other more dominant groups have resulted in their substantial marginalisation within modern African states. (statemaster.com)
  • It is designed to familiarize students with the political, social, economical, religious, and intellectual histories of the world. (crown.edu)