Loading...
  • cytoplasm
  • All cells have numerous mitochondria in the cytoplasm which surrounds the nucleus. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Mitochondria are small energy-synthesising structures vital to cell function, and are only inherited maternally from the egg's cytoplasm, meaning that mitochondrial defects will be inherited by all the offspring of an affected mother. (bionews.org.uk)
  • The egg cytoplasm when normally nucleated is of course, capable of giving rise to the complete range of differentiated cell types, while in the absence of the nucleus it may cleave but fails completely to differentiate. (pnas.org)
  • In order to make such tests of nuclear differentiation it is first necessary to develop a method of transplantation that leaves both the transplanted nucleus and the recipient egg cytoplasm in undamaged condition. (pnas.org)
  • i.e. the nuclear DNA of one human being is used to create a genetic copy or "clone" of that individual by transfer to egg-derived cytoplasm from a donor, killing the original embryo and the donor in the process (see "Serious Ethical Concerns" below). (thepublicdiscourse.com)
  • cell's
  • GSC licensed a process called 'chromatin transfer' that better exposes the donor cell's genetic material - chromatin - to the egg cell, says GSC's chief scientist, Irina Polejaeva. (usmessageboard.com)
  • However, there is a small amount of DNA stored in the cell's mitochondria , which produce most of the energy that the cell needs to survive. (drwile.com)
  • The stem cells described in this paper are the first human cells that are known to be capable of cell division with just one copy of the parent cell's genome. (phys.org)
  • created in 1996
  • The first cloned animal Dolly the sheep was created in 1996 using expensive and time-consuming cell surgery with a micromanipulator. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • chromosomes
  • When all the environmental conditions are right, the single fertilized egg quivers, doubles its chromosomes, and divides in two. (hawkhill.com)
  • Most of a person's DNA is found in the nucleus of the cell, carried on structures called chromosomes. (nbcnews.com)
  • Mitalipov's team took the chromosomes out of one set of human egg cells. (nbcnews.com)
  • They replaced them with chromosomes from human donor eggs. (nbcnews.com)
  • A haploid cell with 23 chromosomes (left), and a diploid cell with 46 chromosomes (right). (phys.org)
  • Human cells are considered 'diploid' because they inherit two sets of chromosomes, 46 in total, 23 from the mother and 23 from the father. (phys.org)
  • The only exceptions are reproductive (egg and sperm) cells, known as 'haploid' cells because they contain a single set of 23 chromosomes. (phys.org)
  • The researchers showed that these haploid stem cells were pluripotent-meaning they were able to differentiate into many other cell types, including nerve, heart, and pancreatic cells-while retaining a single set of chromosomes. (phys.org)
  • procedure
  • In general, the IVF procedure results in a surplus of leftover eggs. (ivf.net)
  • However this procedure is not without controversy as there is always the possibility that the same person may donate both sperm and eggs. (medindia.net)
  • The current experiment used seven young women as egg donors (a procedure known to risk their health), collecting a total of 126 eggs for experiments, but resulting in only two cell lines. (cmda.org)
  • During the ICSI procedure , one sperm is selected from the semen sample and injected directly into the egg . (medihub.org)
  • differentiate
  • Each of these hundred or so stem cells has the potential to further divide and then differentiate to form blood cells, muscle cells, bone cells, nerve cells, skin cells. (hawkhill.com)
  • Children's Hospital researcher and HSCI Executive Committee member George Daley explains that the ultimate goal of all three HSCI researchers, once they understand how embryonic stem cells are programmed to differentiate into specific cell types, is to literally move a patient's disease into a petri [laboratory] dish. (rxpgnews.com)
  • patient's
  • In the future, this process could be used to create new replacement cells and tissues of many kinds which could be implanted into the patient without fear of rejection by the patient's immune system. (christiantoday.com)
  • The new cells would be transplanted into the patient's body, where they could replace damaged cells. (britannica.com)
  • Because the new cells would contain the patient's own DNA, they would not be rejected by the immune system . (britannica.com)
  • Disease in which the immune system confuses the patient's own cells for foreign cells and attacks them. (genomebc.ca)
  • therapies
  • Senior study author Dr Dieter Egli said in the LA Times "This advance brings us a significant step closer to the development of cell replacement therapies. (christiantoday.com)
  • Harvard Stem Cell Institute
  • Doug Melton of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute who was not involved in this research, said in the Daily Mail, that despite this development representing an "impressive technical achievement", the techniques involved would be more likely used to create new cells for study, rather than a future source of transplant material. (christiantoday.com)
  • reproductive
  • The many cells within plants and animals -except the reproductive cells (eggs and sperm)-are clones of older cells. (britannica.com)
  • Consistent with our past work, cells derived from the donor bone marrow are getting into the ovaries and developing into immature oocytes, says Jonathan Tilly, PhD, director of the Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology ( www.vcrb.org ) at MGH, the studys senior author. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Because their genetic content is equivalent to germ cells, they might also be useful for reproductive purposes. (phys.org)
  • organism
  • This single cell, called a zygote, contains all of the information needed to produce a new and uniquely new organism. (hawkhill.com)
  • human stem
  • This study has given us a new type of human stem cell that will have an important impact on human genetic and medical research," said Nissim Benvenisty, MD, PhD, Director of the Azrieli Center for Stem Cells and Genetic Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and principal co-author of the study. (phys.org)
  • blastocysts
  • The stem cells that Professor Hwang claims to have created subsequent to the 2005 publication were also turned out to have originated from frozen fertilized eggs and not from cloned blastocysts. (nytimes.com)
  • laboratory
  • The institute is dedicated to advancing all forms of stem cell science from laboratory bench to patient bedside as quickly as possible. (scienceblog.com)
  • The DNA samples for the ES cell line included those from 20 subcultured NT-1 cell lines in culture or in frozen state from Professor Hwang's laboratory, one deposited to the Korean Cell Line Bank for the purpose of securing a patent, one maintained in Professor Shin Yong Moon's laboratory at SNU, and one maintained in the MizMedi Hospital. (nytimes.com)
  • The teratoma, the cell line deposited in the Korean Cell Line Bank, and the cell lines maintained in Professor Moon's laboratory and in the MizMedi Hospital all showed an identical fingerprinting pattern. (nytimes.com)
  • Among the twenty independent subcultures from Professor Hwang's laboratory, nine produced the identical pattern to the aforementioned three samples, but the other eleven produced a distinct pattern that was in fact identical to the fingerprinting pattern of MizMedi ES cell line #5 derived from IVF egg. (nytimes.com)
  • fertilisation
  • The globally unprecedented 'egg-sharing' scheme is being run by the North-East England Stem Cell Institute (Nesci) in Newcastle, and was approved by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority in July 2006. (ivf.net)
  • technique
  • Because the child ends up with DNA from its mother, father and a donor, this mitochondrial replacement therapy has been nicknamed the "three-parent baby" technique. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Belmonte's team is now gearing up to try its own technique on human eggs. (newscientist.com)
  • Because most women at risk of passing on faulty mitochondria to their children carry some healthy and some mutated mitochondria, this technique offers a way to potentially increase the number of healthy mitochondria and lower the number of harmful mitochondria in their eggs. (newscientist.com)
  • Three years ago, the same team announced they'd used the technique to create reconstituted eggs from monkeys called macaques, fertilize those eggs, and implant them into females. (nbcnews.com)
  • This activates the egg and causes it to rotate so that the animal pole is uppermost and the egg nucleus can be taken out with a glass needle by Porter's 9 technique. (pnas.org)
  • differentiation
  • Therefore, if the egg nucleus could be replaced by one from a differentiated cell, the nature of the ensuing development should reveal the character of the transplanted nucleus-complete differentiation would indicate that irreversible nuclear differentiation had not occurred, while limited differentiation would indicate that it had. (pnas.org)
  • Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells, Nature (2016). (phys.org)
  • women
  • Women who donate some of their eggs to stem cell research will receive half-price discounted IVF treatment - a 1,500 stipend reducing the costs of one cycle of IVF treatment from 3,000 - at the Newcastle Fertility Centre. (ivf.net)
  • Donor recruitment for the scheme began last Thursday and targets women in the North-East of England aged 21 to 35. (ivf.net)
  • The women in the experiment wishing to conceive could not because of a genetic defect in the mitochondria of their own eggs. (laleva.org)
  • Another is about the safety of the women donating the eggs. (publicradioeast.org)
  • Is It Ethical To Pay Women To Donate Eggs For Medical Research? (discovermagazine.com)
  • Egg donors were 'financially reimbursed,' an economic incentive that can prey especially on poor young women. (cmda.org)
  • An industry that induces women to exchange their eggs and risk their health is exploitive and should not be countenanced. (cmda.org)