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  • ecology
  • Ecological extinction stands out because it is the interaction ecology of a species that is important for conservation work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ecological Reviews publishes books at the cutting edge of modern ecology, providing a forum for volumes that discuss topics that are focal points of current activity and likely long-term importance to the progress of the field. (cambridge.org)
  • Ecological Microcosms is a seminal work which reviews the expanding field of enclosed ecosystem research, and relates the results and models of microcosm studies to general concepts in ecology. (springer.com)
  • The Earth's leading biocentric data and action network needs your donation to continue protecting ecosystems, and spreading deeply ecology and green liberty thought and solutions Appeal for donations from Dr. Glen Barry, President, Ecological Internet http://www.climateark.org/shared/donate/ * We are 41% to our goal of $25K, with 58 donors having given $10,237. (causes.com)
  • Ecological Complexity is an international journal devoted to the publication of high quality, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of biocomplexity in the environment , theoretical ecology , and special issues on topics of current interest. (elsevier.com)
  • Clements explicitly analogized the successional development of ecological communities with ontogenetic development of individual organisms, and his model is often referred to as the pseudo-organismic theory of community ecology. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • An ecological equivalent to an organism is an organism from a different taxonomic group exhibiting similar adaptations in a similar habitat, an example being the different succulents found in American and African deserts, cactus and euphorbia , respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspects
  • Although, still there are in plants some unlearned steps closely related to the contaminants multistage degradation process, authors are making an attempts for the evaluation of different aspects of plants ecological potential from the modern understanding, revealing the criterion for the evaluation of deviations under the action of contaminants in ultra structural architectonics of plant cells. (springer.com)
  • Framework
  • ecological risk assessment The application of a formal framework, analytical process, or model to estimate the effects of human actions(s) on a natural resource and to interpret the significance of those effects in light of the uncertainties identified in each component of the assessment process. (epa.gov)
  • ecosystem
  • QUICK Tip: Information from ecological risk assessments can be used by risk managers for follow-up such as communicating to interested parties and the general public, limiting activities related to the ecological stressor, limiting use of a given chemical, or developing a monitoring plan to determine if risks have been reduced or whether an ecosystem is recovering. (epa.gov)
  • convergent
  • As another example, the Anolis lizards of the Greater Antilles are a rare example of convergent evolution , adaptive radiation , and the existence of ecological equivalents: the Anolis lizards evolved in similar microhabitats independently of each other and resulted in the same ecomorphs across all four islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • agricultural
  • Research has shown that the agricultural landscapes are still transforming unchecked," says ecological scientist Sarah Redlich from the Biocenter of the Julius-Maximilians-Universit├Ąt W├╝rzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany. (innovations-report.com)
  • One thing became clear very quickly: There is huge need for action and the will to change things together to implement more sustainable and ecological agricultural practices. (innovations-report.com)
  • branches
  • Ecological Genomics covers a wide array of organisms (microbes, plants and animals) in order to be able to identify central concepts that motivate and derive from recent investigations in different branches of the tree of life. (springer.com)
  • focuses
  • Bringing together world-class experts from science, policy and practice to highlight and debate the importance of peatlands from an ecological, social and economic perspective, this book focuses on how peatland restoration can foster climate change mitigation. (cambridge.org)
  • practice
  • This essay will discuss what a social ecological perspective consists of, what limitations it may incur and how it can assist us in developing best practice and understanding when working with children, young people and families. (bartleby.com)
  • What does ecological intensification look like in practice? (innovations-report.com)
  • research
  • EPA begins the process of a Ecological risk assessment with planning and research. (epa.gov)
  • This book provides a practical introduction to analysing ecological data using real data sets collected as part of postgraduate ecological studies or research projects. (springer.com)
  • In addition to laying the scientific foundation of ecological intensification, the project prioritises the communication of the research results to the public. (innovations-report.com)
  • chemical
  • Food production using ecological farming ensures healthy farming and healthy food for today and tomorrow, by protecting soil, water and climate, promotes biodiversity, and does not contaminate the environment with chemical inputs or genetic engineering. (greenpeace.org)
  • study
  • Design Ecological study of low-income to high-income 88 countries. (bmj.com)
  • Causal associations could not be inferred due to data gaps and the ecological study design. (bmj.com)
  • Each case study explores the statistical options most appropriate to the ecological questions being asked and will help the reader choose the best approach to analysing their own data. (springer.com)
  • just try to find a case study that matches your own ecological questions and data structure, and use this as starting point for you own analysis. (springer.com)
  • process
  • It is a phenomenon or process by which an ecological community undergoes more or less orderly and predictable changes following a disturbance or the initial colonization of a new habitat. (wikipedia.org)
  • future
  • Ecological risk assessments can be used to predict the likelihood of future effects (prospective) or evaluate the likelihood that effects are caused by past exposure to stressors (retrospective). (epa.gov)
  • given
  • Given the overwhelming harm being done to the world's environment and to its people, it is essential today to consider how we might organize a truly ecological civilization-one that exists in harmony with natural systems-instead of trying to overwhelm and dominate nature. (monthlyreview.org)
  • high
  • Sethi SA, O'Hanley JR, Gerken J, Ashline J, Bradley C (2017) High value of ecological information for river connectivity restoration. (fws.gov)