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  • Micelles
  • Guo J, Cheng WP, Gu J, Ding C, Qu X, Yang Z, O'Driscoll CM. pH-triggered amphiphilic poly-L-lysine micelles potential for passive targeted delivery of siRNA to solid tumours: physicochemical characterizations and in vitro evaluations J. Controlled Release, Eur J Pharm Sci. (ucd.ie)
  • degradation
  • Gastric irritation or drug instability in gastric fluid: Protection for those drugs are essential which are effected by gastric acidic environment and undergo degradation in gastric acidic medium (eg, peptide drugs), irritate the gastric mucosa (NSAIDS) or induce nausea and vomiting. (slideshare.net)
  • system
  • 1. PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM is defined as the rapid and transient release of a certain amount of drug molecules within a short time-period immediately after a predetermined off-release period. (slideshare.net)
  • Pulsatilc delivery by change in membrane permeability E.g.Sigmoidal release system. (slideshare.net)
  • The presentation captures the IP activity along with the key players in the smart drug delivery system industry. (slideshare.net)
  • The smart miniature drug delivery system is used for delivering drugs to the host. (slideshare.net)
  • Biological information detected by biological sensors is analyzed and the drug delivery system is actuated to deliver the drug based on the information. (slideshare.net)
  • The system utilizes MEMS or NEMS technology based drug pumps, micro-pumps, micro-needles, micro-osmotic pumps, and nano-pumps. (slideshare.net)
  • A self-microemulsifying drug delivery system ( SMEDDS ) is a drug delivery system that uses a microemulsion achieved by chemical rather than mechanical means. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actual applications of Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system' (SMEDDS) remain rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may employ a sustained release drug delivery system or a controlled release technology. (medindia.net)
  • Various factors are taken into consideration for a proper administration of drugs and the drug delivery system is an interdisciplinary field. (medindia.net)
  • These are the most common vehicles used for a targeted drug delivery system. (medindia.net)
  • Liposome delivery system helps in microphage penetration of the drug and delivers optimal concentration at the infection site. (medindia.net)
  • A drug is only as effective as its delivery system, and the advent of new molecules and new innovations have to be matched by enhanced delivery and containment methods, suggests West Pharma exec. (in-pharmatechnologist.com)
  • Only when a compound can not make it through the digestive system have companies considered making drugs that need a direct route to the bloodstream. (thebody.com)
  • A drug delivery system including a chamber, which is configured for enclosing or covering at least a surface of a patient, a source of a drug, and a pressure source, which selectively pressurizes the chamber. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • There are many positives to this solution in that there is no blood-brain barrier issue, no systemic side effects (the drug doesn't go through the whole body system), it is selective to the neurological target and it requires much less drug. (rdmag.com)
  • MRI Interventions Inc., Irvine, Calif., saw a need to fix these barriers and developed the ClearPoint system, a combination of hardware, software and disposable components that all work together in a seamless manner to deliver a simple workflow for neurosurgeons to deliver drugs to the brain. (rdmag.com)
  • The ClearPoint system allows neurosurgeons to see the target and see the catheter as it goes into the brain and tumor to watch the drug get infused. (rdmag.com)
  • A system for delivering a drug to a patient according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown as being of modular construction including a control module and a reservoir module. (google.ca)
  • The drug delivery system of the present invention may be removably secured to the patient allowing the patient to be ambulatory while being administered drugs. (google.ca)
  • 3. The drug delivery system of claim 2 wherein the holding means comprises, in combination: a lock mechanism. (google.ca)
  • 2. The drug delivery system of claim 1 wherein the reservoir module includes a pressure plate, with the communication providing means being located and supported on the pressure plate, with the drug forcing means and the switch of the occlusion detector of the control module interacting with the communication providing means on the pressure plate. (google.com)
  • 3. The drug delivery system of claim 2 wherein the communication providing means comprises, in combination: a tube extending from the drug container to the patient, with the tube having a uniform construction in its outer and inner diameter and said tube having a uniform material throughout its length from the drug storage container to adjacent the patient. (google.com)
  • 4. The drug delivery system of claim 3 wherein the reservoir module further comprises, in combination: means for insuring proper spacing maintenance between the pressure plate and the control module for the interaction of the drug forcing means and the switch of the occlusion detector of the control module with the communication providing means. (google.com)
  • Part of the difficulty in finding cures for these central nervous system (CNS) disorders is that there is yet no truly efficient delivery method for drugs to cross the BBB. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood Brain B
  • If drugs can pass the blood-brain barrier, there are sometimes issues with selectivity to neurological targets. (rdmag.com)
  • Drug delivery to the brain is the process of passing therapeutically active molecules across the blood-brain barrier for the purpose of treating brain maladies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the difficulty for drugs to pass through the blood-brain barrier, a study was conducted to determine the factors that influence a compound's ability to transverse the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is surprising because one would think that the most effective way to make a drug move through a lipophilic barrier is to increase its lipophilicity, it turns out that it is a complex function of all of these characteristics that makes a drug able to pass through the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • barriers
  • The obvious solution to these challenges and the barriers faced with standard drug delivery to the brain is to deliver drugs directly into the neurological target. (rdmag.com)
  • experimental
  • The promise of drug delivery strategies is in their potential to improve current treatments and create opportunities for experimental therapy. (thebody.com)
  • Many companies probably feel that it's cheaper and safer to spend money on developing drugs that don't rely on experimental drug delivery. (thebody.com)
  • With new chapters on nanobiotechnology techniques, experimental methods, and the clinical use for the intrathecal delivery of analgesics. (worldcat.org)
  • Feb. 16, 2012 -- An experimental, implanted drug-delivery microchip that releases medication on command from an external wireless control could one day free patients from daily injections and improve treatment compliance. (webmd.com)
  • Microbial drug delivery is not currently used as a standard route of drug administration due to its experimental nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • carrier
  • The physico-chemical properties of the drug, carrier and the binder compounds. (medindia.net)
  • A method and apparatus of treating tissue adjacent a bodily conduit using thermotherapy, while preventing obstructions of the bodily conduit due to edema, includes injection of a drug-encapsulated within a heat-sensitive carrier, such as a liposome, within a region of tissue to be treated. (google.com)
  • In addition, the heat produced by the energy-emitting source activates the heat-sensitive carrier to activate the release of the encapsulated drug and the drug targets the tissue to be heated. (google.com)
  • nano
  • As an alternative synthetic method of magnetic drug delivery, a "non-iron oxide"-based smart delivery platform has been very recently developed by self-assembly of the Fe(salen) drugs into nano-cargoes encapsulated by a smart polymer, exhibiting bio-safe multifunctional magnetic capabilities, including MRI, magnetic field- and pH-responsive heat-releasing hyperthermia effects, and controlled release. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bolaamphiphile nano-vesicles can cross the BBB, and they allow controlled release of the drug to target sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • carriers
  • Along with delivery and transport methods, there are several means of functionalizing, or activating, the nanoparticle carriers. (wikipedia.org)
  • conventional
  • The first drug marketed as a SMEDDS was cyclosporin , and it had significantly improved bioavailability compared with the conventional solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are examples of conventional drug delivery. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Conventional stereotaxy makes use of a frame attached to the patient's head and some form of catheter or cannula to administer the drug, and was first used in 1908 on small animals and in 1947 on humans. (rdmag.com)
  • chemotherapeutic
  • Our ultimate goal is to deliver higher concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents to target cells where they are cleared at a slower rate while reducing the concentrations encountered by other organs compared to the standard delivery methods for the same chemotherapeutic agent. (sri.com)
  • method
  • 6. The method of claim 1 wherein the injecting step comprises injecting the drug encapsulated within the heat-sensitive liposome into the bloodstream of a patient. (google.com)
  • Liposome
  • heating with the energy-emitting source at least a portion of the tissue to be treated to destroy the heated portion and also to activate the heat-sensitive liposome to release the encapsulated drug such that the drug targets the tissue to be treated. (google.com)
  • The Effect of Liposome Encapsulation on the Pharmacokinetics of Recombinant Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (rSLPI) Therapy after Local Delivery to a Guinea Pig Asthma Model. (ucd.ie)
  • Another type of lipid-nanoparticle that can be used for drug delivery to the brain is a cationic liposome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delivering
  • Cima says the technology could potentially be useful for delivering any potent drug or even multiple drugs, with the benefit of improving patient compliance. (webmd.com)
  • Delivering drugs into the brain to treat neurological diseases and disorders has been a challenge. (rdmag.com)
  • programmable
  • MIT professor of engineering Michael J. Cima, PhD, originally developed the idea for a programmable drug-delivery microchip more than a decade ago, along with colleague Robert Langer, ScD. (webmd.com)
  • University of California, San Diego professor of bioengineering John T. Watson, PhD, calls the 20-dose trial an important first step in showing that a programmable drug-delivery microchip is possible. (webmd.com)
  • nanoparticle
  • Specific targeting and delivery of virus envelope-coated nanoparticle cargoes into receptor-bearing cells and subcellular compartments. (nsti.org)
  • Drug diffusion through the nanoparticle matrix. (authorstream.com)
  • These means include dissolving or absorbing a drug throughout the nanoparticle, encapsulating a drug inside the particle, or attaching a drug on the surface of the particle. (wikipedia.org)
  • insoluble
  • The lag time is controlled by a plug, which gets pushed away by swelling or erosion, and the drug is released as a "Pulse" from the insoluble capsule body. (slideshare.net)
  • potent
  • It has proved to be the most potent progestational drug yet uncovered - hundreds of times more active orally than progesterone and, weight for weight, some fifty times more active by subcutaneous injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • release
  • For many drugs taken by mouth, faster release rates improve the drug acceptance by consumers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The technology uses binding chemicals that release drugs at a controlled rate at the targeted location in the body. (medindia.net)
  • These particles can exactly reach the target diseased site and deliver the drug in a controlled release manner. (medindia.net)
  • Nanostructures can sense the environment of the site of release and deliver the drug to the target site. (medindia.net)
  • Time release technology might allow for drugs now taken three or more times a day to be taken once a day or even once a week. (thebody.com)
  • Control & sustain release of the drug. (authorstream.com)
  • The devices may, in embodiments, possess at least two drug release profiles, in embodiments at least three drug release profiles. (google.co.uk)
  • Research into microbial drug delivery refers to this route of administration as topical, since the microbes release the drug directly to the surface of affected tissues, namely the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering research involving the controlled release and delivery of drugs and other biologically active agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Microbial drug delivery is an emerging form of drug administration characterized by the use of commensal microbes that have been genetically modified to produce medications for chronic diseases in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • injection
  • Because most people prefer taking a pill over an injection, research in HIV and most other diseases has focused almost solely on developing drugs that are taken by mouth, usually as a pill. (thebody.com)
  • As is true with many drugs in pill form, most anti-HIV drugs require that people take a larger dose of the drug by mouth than is necessary by injection. (thebody.com)
  • methods
  • The placing of the catheter to deliver the drugs is done using indirect targeting methods based on previously obtained images. (rdmag.com)
  • vaccines
  • Habitually, injectables were used for delivery of hormones, vaccines and insulin but as technology advances the application is continuing to expand. (smi-online.co.uk)