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  • 1913
  • Faced with separate school boards' resistance and defiance of the new regulation, the Ministry of Education issued Regulation 18 in August 1913 to coerce the school boards' employees into compliance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation 17: Circular of Instruction No. 17 for Ontario Separate Schools for the School Year 1912-1913", in Site for Language Management in Canada, retrieved November 20, 2008 Gordon L. Heath (2014). (wikipedia.org)
  • regulate
  • Regulation F specifies that banks must institute internal rules that regulate the amount of risk that they can take in their business proceedings with other institutions. (investopedia.com)
  • The Judea and Samaria Settlement Regulation Law (Hebrew: חוק להסדרת ההתיישבות ביהודה והשומרון‎), commonly known as the Regulation Law (Hebrew: חוק ההסדרה‎) or sometimes the Regularization Law, is an Israeli law that aims to retroactively legalize Israeli settlements in the West Bank Area C. It is meant to "regulate" the status of about 2,000 to 4,000 residences in 16 settlements which were built on Palestinian-owned lands. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • In July 2017, the European Court of Justice upheld the Dublin Regulation declaring it still stands despite the high influx of 2015, giving EU member states the right to deport migrants to the first country of entry to the EU. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2018
  • 14 February 2018 - The sixteenth meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) regarding the international spread of poliovirus was convened by the Director General on 7 February 2018 at WHO headquarters with members, advisers and invited member states attending via teleconference. (who.int)
  • regulators
  • Some countries have separated their financial regulators along the lines of prudential/consumer protection such as the UK with the Prudential Regulation Authority (United Kingdom) or in Australia with the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority. (wikipedia.org)
  • retrospective
  • The EPA's interest in including a systematic retrospective review element in new regulation has the potential to provide a transparent and well-structured method for assessing which decisions worked well and which didn't. (rand.org)
  • behaviors
  • Technical control The Internet regulation departments restrain the wrongful expression and behaviors by techniques such like blocking information negative to social stable and carrying out real name system through Internet. (wikipedia.org)
  • reform
  • On theoretical grounds, it has been argued that a reform of prudential regulation should integrate three different paradigms: the agency paradigm, the externalities paradigm, and the mood swings paradigm. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 3 December 2008, the European Commission proposed amendments to the Dublin Regulation, creating an opportunity for reform of the Dublin System. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ministry
  • Ministry of Industry and Information Technology is responsible for the development and regulation of the industry, Ministry of Public Security regulates security and fights crimes, and the Propaganda Department leads the system where departments of culture, broadcasting, journalism, education, etc. regulates the information contents. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was a regulation written by the Ministry of Education, issued in July 1912 by the Conservative government of premier Sir James P. Whitney. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulates
  • In molecular biology and genetics, transcriptional regulation is the means by which a cell regulates the conversion of DNA to RNA (transcription), thereby orchestrating gene activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • In a recent study with University of California, Davis animal scientist Joy Mench , we examined urban poultry regulations in Colorado - the only state that collects and makes public animal shelter surrender data. (theconversation.com)
  • Army regulations state a soldier AWOL over 30 days is a deserter. (wiktionary.org)
  • State-mandated regulation is government intervention in the private market in an attempt to implement policy and produce outcomes which might not otherwise occur, ranging from consumer protection to faster growth or technological advancement. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some countries (in particular the Scandinavian countries) industrial relations are to a very high degree regulated by the labour market parties themselves (self-regulation) in contrast to state regulation of minimum wages etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to statistics, up to October 2008, 14 different departments such as the NPC of China, the Publicity Department of the Communist Party of China, and the State Council Information Office, had been published more than 60 laws related to internet regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newspapers started early and developed very well without state regulation until the 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Florida State Bar , for example, classifies "antitrust and trade regulation law" as one of the areas of legal practice in which board certification is available, which permits certified attorneys to advertise themselves as specialists or experts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rent regulation in the United States is an issue for each state. (wikipedia.org)
  • previously the Dublin II Regulation and Dublin Convention) is a European Union (EU) law that determines the EU Member State responsible to examine an application for asylum seekers seeking international protection under the Geneva Convention and the EU Qualification Directive, within the European Union. (wikipedia.org)
  • Noise regulation includes statutes or guidelines relating to sound transmission established by national, state or provincial and municipal levels of government. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • MDBPs are a series of interrelated regulations that address risks from microbial pathogens and disinfectants/disinfection byproducts. (epa.gov)
  • RAND research has sought to develop methods for collecting interpretable, quantitative information about the costs and benefits of environmental regulations in areas where compliance imposes a financial burden, awareness of the health risks of noncompliance is lower, and officials are less trusting of the data on which regulations are based. (rand.org)
  • Prudential regulation is type of financial regulation that requires financial firms to control risks and hold adequate capital as defined by capital requirements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treaty
  • The description of regulations can be found in Article 288 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (formerly Article 249 TEC ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The provisions of the Regulation were also extended by a treaty to non-member states Switzerland on 1 March 2008, which on 5 June 2005 voted by 54.6% to ratify it, and Liechtenstein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress
  • Having some companies specializing in the still-not-legal dietary ingredient CBD join CRN will help the trade group as it looks to "help FDA, or Congress, craft those regulations," said Andrew Shao, CRN's senior vice president of scientific and regulatory. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Noise regulation subsided sharply in 1981, when Congress ended funding for the NCA. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • While member states are prohibited from obscuring the direct effect of regulations, it is common practice to pass legislation dealing with consequential matters arising from the coming into force of a regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations may create costs as well as benefits and may produce unintended reactivity effects, such as defensive practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • implementation
  • Stronger health systems, Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and the implementation of the International Health Regulations (2005) are critical to building community and country resilience. (who.int)
  • Even if the proposed regulations make refineries only 7.3 percent safer than they are currently, they will be worth their implementation costs. (rand.org)
  • generally
  • The internet regulation in China generally formed by: Legislation China is the one who owns the greatest amount of legislation in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bank regulation is a complex process and generally consists of two components: licensing, and supervision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rules
  • In conformity with applicable rules and regulations. (wiktionary.org)
  • Regulation is an abstract concept of management of complex systems according to a set of rules and trends. (wikipedia.org)
  • This regulation, via law, rules or procedures, can have various goals, for example intervention to protect a stated "public interest", or encouraging competition and an effective media market, or establishing common technical standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is in contrast to consumer protection rules that are also part of financial regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Common examples of regulation include controls on market entries, prices, wages, development approvals, pollution effects, employment for certain people in certain industries, standards of production for certain goods, the military forces and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comprehensive rent regulation is common in Commonwealth and European Union countries, including Canada, Germany, Ireland, Cyprus and Sweden, and also some states in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • extent
  • Much of the early understanding of transcription came from prokaryotic organisms, although the extent and complexity of transcriptional regulation is greater in eukaryotes. (wikipedia.org)
  • consists
  • It is the cornerstone of the Dublin System, which consists of the Dublin Regulation and the EURODAC Regulation, which establishes a Europe-wide fingerprinting database for unauthorised entrants to the EU. (wikipedia.org)
  • laws
  • When a regulation comes into force, it overrides all national laws dealing with the same subject matter and subsequent national legislation must be consistent with and made in the light of the regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most EU member states have replaced media ownership regulations with competition laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations, which specify how to execute those laws in much more detail, should be regarded in much the same way that programmers regard their code and algorithms, that is, as a constantly updated toolset to achieve the outcomes specified in the laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rent regulation is a system of laws, administered by a court or a public authority, which aim to ensure the quality and affordability of housing and tenancies on the rental market for land. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, many US states maintain rent controls, and a majority of OECD countries maintain rent-regulation laws, some changing to softer rent controls, which enjoy considerable popular support, and support in economic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada there are rent regulation laws in each province. (wikipedia.org)
  • government
  • Algorithmic regulation is an alternative form of government where the advantages and usages of computer algorithms are applied to regulations and law enforcement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trade regulation is a field of law, often bracketed with antitrust (as in the phrase "antitrust and trade regulation law"), including government regulation of unfair methods of competition and unfair or deceptive business acts or practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation 17 (French: Règlement 17) was a regulation of the Ontario Conservative government designed to shut down French-language schools at a time when Francophones from Quebec were moving into eastern Ontario. (wikipedia.org)
  • The regulation was eventually repealed in 1927 by the government of Howard Ferguson following the recommendations of the Merchant-Scott-Côté report. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in areas where the federal government had failed to promulgate clear standards (such as aircraft noise), no further progress could be made except by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which has an inherent conflict of interest regarding noise regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bank regulation is a form of government regulation which subjects banks to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, designed to create market transparency between banking institutions and the individuals and corporations with whom they conduct business, among other things. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite
  • Despite the repeal of Regulation 17, however, French-language schools in Ontario were not officially recognized under the provincial Education Act until 1968. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • Allosteric regulations are a natural example of control loops, such as feedback from downstream products or feedforward from upstream substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in New York City, almost half of property units continue to have the protection of rent regulation, while others on the private market are left to be priced according to what the market will bear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legal
  • A regulation is a legal act of the European Union that becomes immediately enforceable as law in all member states simultaneously. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study of formal (legal and/or official) and informal (extra-legal and/or unofficial) regulation constitutes one of the central concerns of the sociology of law. (wikipedia.org)
  • The claim has been made on a number of occasions both by ECRE and UNHCR, that the Dublin regulation impedes the legal rights and personal welfare of asylum seekers, including the right to a fair examination of their asylum claim and, where recognised, to effective protection, as well as the uneven distribution of asylum claims among Member States. (wikipedia.org)
  • change
  • The regulations would change how the Drug Enforcement Administration sets production quotas for drug companies. (nytimes.com)
  • The sequential model of allosteric regulation holds that subunits are not connected in such a way that a conformational change in one induces a similar change in the others. (wikipedia.org)
  • In electrical engineering, particularly power engineering, voltage regulation is a measure of change in the voltage magnitude between the sending and receiving end of a component, such as a transmission or distribution line. (wikipedia.org)
  • member
  • The Dublin II Regulation was adopted in 2003, replacing the Dublin Convention in all EU member states except Denmark, which has an opt-out from implementing regulations under the area of freedom, security and justice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dublin III Regulation (No. 604/2013) was approved in June 2013, replacing the Dublin II Regulation, and applies to all member states except Denmark. (wikipedia.org)
  • The regulation applies to all the member states of the European Union with the exception of Denmark. (wikipedia.org)
  • This regulation enables a somewhat simplified route by allowing direct contact between the courts in the member states. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ontario
  • The Ontario Heritage Trust erected a plaque for L'École Guigues and Regulation 17 in front of the former school building, 159 Murray Street, Ottawa. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • Algorithmic regulation is supposed to be a system of governance where more exact data collected from citizens via their smart devices and computers are used for more efficiency in organizing human life as a collective. (wikipedia.org)
  • After ECRE, the UNHCR and other non-governmental organisations openly criticised Greece's asylum system, including the lack of protection and care for unaccompanied children, several countries suspended transfers of asylum seekers to Greece under the Dublin II regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Voltage regulation describes the ability of a system to provide near constant voltage over a wide range of load conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • The public realm is privatised, the regulations restraining the ultra-wealthy and the companies they control are abandoned, and Edwardian levels of inequality are almost fetishised. (wiktionary.org)
  • In biochemistry , allosteric regulation (or allosteric control ) is the regulation of an enzyme by binding an effector molecule at a site other than the enzyme's active site . (wikipedia.org)
  • Positive control elements that bind to DNA and incite higher levels of transcription While these means of transcriptional regulation also exist in eukaryotes, the transcriptional landscape is significantly more complicated both by the number of proteins involved as well as by the presence of introns and the packaging of DNA into histones. (wikipedia.org)
  • This means that transcriptional regulation in the form of protein repressors and positive control elements can either increase or decrease transcription. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • The agreement is called the International Health Regulations, or IHR (2005), and WHO plays the coordinating role. (who.int)
  • TRB's Transportation Research Circular E-C123, Traffic Safety and Alcohol Regulation: A Symposium provides an overview of the information presented at a June 5-6, 2006, symposium that examined the role of alcohol regulation in traffic safety. (trb.org)
  • means
  • Regulations can be adopted by means of a variety of legislative procedures depending on their subject matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations are in some sense equivalent to " Acts of Parliament ", in the sense that what they say is law and they do not need to be mediated into national law by means of implementing measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taking of evidence in civil cases prior to the regulation was done by either under the Hague Evidence Convention or by means of a letter rogatory (also called a letter of request), a formal request from a court in one country to take evidence to another in which the witness is domiciled. (wikipedia.org)
  • country
  • WASHINGTON - Attorney General Jeff Sessions proposed new regulations on Tuesday that could severely limit the amount of highly addictive opioid pain medication that drug companies can produce and force them to account for scores of illegitimate prescriptions across the country. (nytimes.com)
  • In response, cities across the country are modifying regulations and overturning long-standing bans to legally accommodate backyard chickens . (theconversation.com)
  • public health
  • On this occasion, the Weekly Epidemiological Record is publishing a series of articles on the Regulations' contribution to global public health security. (who.int)
  • Environmental regulations attempt to protect public health and the environment from pollution by industry and development. (rand.org)
  • rise
  • Code for America Internet of things Sharing economy Technoutopianism Open Data and Algorithmic Regulation, Tim O'Reilly - Beyond Transparency A brief exchange with Tim O'Reilly about "algorithmic regulation", Tim McCormick The rise of data and the death of politics, Evgeny Morozov. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Voltage Regulation formula could be visualized with the following: "Consider power being delivered to a load such that the voltage at the load is the load's rated voltage VRated, if then the load disappears, the voltage at the point of the load will rise to Vnl. (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • Regulation F covers the collection of checks as well as various other services that larger banks offer to smaller ones. (investopedia.com)
  • The regulation also contains various articles to promote the use of communication technologies such as telephone conferencing and videoconferencing. (wikipedia.org)