Loading...
  • scientists
  • It is intended to make the benefits of IVF more accessible to infertile women whilst addressing the shortage of high quality eggs for human stem cell research, thereby assisting scientists to progress in the global race to seek stem cell therapies for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. (ivf.net)
  • However, some scientists argue that this technique is too imperfect a science at this point - the success rate is significantly less than 0.5 per cent and so involves using a high, inefficient number of eggs. (ivf.net)
  • To accomplish this, scientists take DNA out of a cell from the original animal. (britannica.com)
  • Scientists think that cloned cells might be used to treat Alzheimer's disease , spinal cord injuries, and other serious conditions. (britannica.com)
  • Scientists at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have successfully demonstrated that a theoretical--and controversial--technique for generating embryonic stem cells is indeed possible, at least in mice. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Scientists have a number of ideas for perfecting this process, including alternative ways of fusing the nucleus and egg cell, but until the technology is demonstrably safe, it would be unethical to create a human life with such a high likelihood of severe health problems. (kurzweilai.net)
  • When human embryonic stem cells were first discovered in 1998, scientists immediately dreamed of using cloning technology to help people grow their own organ and tissue transplants, and to use them to study disease. (bioethics.net)
  • In the 1950s, scientists generated entire frogs from embryonic frog cells. (dnalc.org)
  • The scientists at the Roslin Institute solved this problem by growing sheep udder cells under starvation conditions. (dnalc.org)
  • Scientists found that Dolly had the same DNA as the udder cells she came from. (dnalc.org)
  • The scientists have taken cells from Cumulina to make more clones. (dnalc.org)
  • In the past few years scientists have learned how to culture these embryonic stem cells in the laboratory. (hawkhill.com)
  • In both methods, scientists begin with mature cells (such as skin or blood cells) taken from the person who is in need of fresh cells or organs, and restore in them the lost powers of embryonic stem cells: to transform themselves into any kind of cell in the body, and to keep reproducing themselves inevitably. (sens.org)
  • A variation on this method allows scientists to take cells that are of a different kind from the cells that are needed, but present in the same tissue, and reprogram them into the needed cells without first passing through the embryonic-stem-cell-like state. (sens.org)
  • The Harvard Stem Cell Institute, co-directed by Melton, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and David Scadden, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center of Regenerative Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is a unique collaborative effort that includes 99 principal investigators and hundreds of additional scientists in laboratories at Harvard University and at many of Harvard's affiliated hospitals. (scienceblog.com)
  • Cloning
  • Cloning fuses a hollowed-out egg cell with a donor cell, typically a skin cell, from the creature to be cloned. (usmessageboard.com)
  • Cloning is the creation of a copy of a cell or of an entire living thing . (britannica.com)
  • The goal is to produce healthy new cells by cloning a patient's own cells. (britannica.com)
  • NBC News ] Researchers say they have made powerful stem cells from both young and old adults using cloning techniques, and also found clues about why it is so difficult to do this with human beings. (bioethics.net)
  • The team, at Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology and the Institute for Stem Cell Research in Los Angeles, say they used the cloning methods to create the stem cells to match a 35-year-old man and a 75-year-old man. (bioethics.net)
  • If verified, it would be only the second confirmed time someone's been able to use cloning methods to make human embryonic stem cells, considered the body's master cells. (bioethics.net)
  • Therapeutic cloning has long been envisioned as a means for generating patient-specific stem cells that could be used to treat a range of age-related diseases," said Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer for Advanced Cell Technology. (bioethics.net)
  • This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged Beginning of Life Matters and Reproductive Technologies , biotechnology , Genetic Testing and Privacy Issues , genomics , Stem Cells and Cloning , syndicated , World News - Home , World News - News . (bioethics.net)
  • Prior to 1996, it was thought that cloning an entire animal could only be done with embryonic cells - cells present in the early stages of an organism's development. (dnalc.org)
  • In cloning, a non-sexual cell from an adult organism is used to produce a new organism. (hawkhill.com)
  • fetal
  • When they cloned using fetal monkey cells, six pregnancies were confirmed in 21 surrogates and yielded two healthy babies. (ohmidog.com)
  • Only one group has ever succeeded, and their lines were generated using fetal and infant cells. (bioethics.net)
  • Harvard Stem Cell Institute
  • Doug Melton of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute who was not involved in this research, said in the Daily Mail, that despite this development representing an "impressive technical achievement", the techniques involved would be more likely used to create new cells for study, rather than a future source of transplant material. (christiantoday.com)
  • divide
  • Researchers then optimised methods to prompt the egg cell to start and continue to divide using electricity and chemical compounds, including caffeine. (www.nhs.uk)
  • These embryonic stem cells can divide and replicate themselves indefinitely, and they can also form any type of tissue in the human body. (bio-medicine.org)
  • 4. Cells in explant divide by mitosis to form mass of identical cells called callus. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Some of these damaged cells are repaired, but others are either destroyed, or forced into a dysfunctional 'senescent' state where they can no longer divide, or commit 'cellular suicide' (apoptosis) for the greater good of the body. (sens.org)
  • involves
  • The solution to this problem involves the rejuvenation biotechnologies with which most people are most familiar: cell therapy and tissue engineering, the science of growing organs for transplant in an artificial, biodegradable scaffold outside the body. (sens.org)
  • The first method involves using various methods to deliver factors that "reprogram" these cells from the mature state into the embryonic stem-cell-like state, generating what are called "induced pluripotent stem cells. (sens.org)
  • clone
  • A clone has exactly the same DNA as the original cell or living thing. (britannica.com)
  • Tissue culture - separation and subsequent growth of meristematic cells from tissue in vitro using nutritent mediums (used to clone plants that don't readily produce, that are endangered or rare, and to grow whole plants from genetically engineered plants). (getrevising.co.uk)
  • She is a clone of these udder cells. (dnalc.org)
  • A laboratory in Hawaii run by Dr. Ryuzo Yanagimachi was the second group to successfully clone an animal from an adult cell. (dnalc.org)
  • First, the cells used to clone the mice were not grown in culture, but instead were used immediately. (dnalc.org)
  • What cell parts would you need to clone a human? (coursehero.com)
  • fewer
  • The thymus - the gland in your breastbone where a major class of immune cells mature - shrinks, leaving you more vulnerable to infectious disease as fewer fresh immune cells are produced. (sens.org)
  • organism
  • After a small number of cell divisions, embryonic cells start to change into the different types of cells that an organism needs, including cells that form muscle, blood, liver, etc. (dnalc.org)
  • Before the experiment at the Roslin Institute, it was thought that once cells differentiated, they could not be used to generate an entire organism. (dnalc.org)
  • Unlike all of the other cells in an adult body, eggs and sperms each contain only half the information needed to produce a new organism. (hawkhill.com)
  • This single cell, called a zygote, contains all of the information needed to produce a new and uniquely new organism. (hawkhill.com)
  • identical
  • 5. Callus is divided up into individual cells or clumps and transferred to new medium containing shoot-stimulating hormones to stimulate growth of identical plantlets. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • therapies
  • Senior study author Dr Dieter Egli said in the LA Times "This advance brings us a significant step closer to the development of cell replacement therapies. (christiantoday.com)
  • clones
  • The Roslin Institute argued that clones did differ in meaningful ways from the donor animals. (law.com)
  • Environmental
  • Environmental influences on their behavior might make them unique, as would the mitochondrial DNA they carry, which comes from the egg cell donor. (law.com)
  • When all the environmental conditions are right, the single fertilized egg quivers, doubles its chromosomes, and divides in two. (hawkhill.com)