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  • eggs
  • It's a problem with human cloneing, because human eggs are expensive - the only way to get them is to pump a woman full of hormones to induce many ovulations at once. (slashdot.org)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov, of Oregon Health & Science University, first cloned monkey embryos before trying his method on human eggs. (kwit.org)
  • But getting the technique to work with humans eggs has been an exercise in frustration. (publicradioeast.org)
  • Germline engineering targets the genes in eggs, sperm or embryos during very early stages of their development. (reference.com)
  • So it was thought that hundreds of human eggs would have to be used, which was both scientifically and practically untenable, especially for widespread laboratory use of any cell products. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • clones
  • However, given that three women in Europe are purportedly carrying human clones in their wombs, our procrastinating war of words continue, has left our future in the hands of dangerous mavericks bent on reinventing mankind. (yowusa.com)
  • Everyone remembers Dolly, no-one really notices the hundreds of other sheep clones that didn't survive. (slashdot.org)
  • These embryos won't work for producing clones humans…they are being used to harvest stem cells. (kottke.org)
  • Producing Dolly involved the transfer of the genetic material of an adult into an empty cell sack, something that could in principle produce as many clones as required. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Although scientists at Duke University suggested that human clones might not experience the problems encountered in cloned animals, the risks remains very high and quite unpredictable. (encyclopedia.com)
  • morally
  • Yes, there are people--including politically very active and well-organized people--who declare that human embryos are morally important people in exactly the same way that you and I are people. (slate.com)
  • To them, disposing of an embryo is morally equivalent to murdering one of our readers. (slate.com)
  • The experiments involve creating and then destroying human embryos for research purposes, which some find morally repugnant. (kwit.org)
  • But beyond that, the creation and destruction of a human embryo is morally repugnant to people who believe an embryo has the same moral standing as a human being. (kwit.org)
  • somatic
  • Scientists have applied somatic cell nuclear transfer to clone human and mammalian embryos as a means to produce stem cells for laboratory and medical use. (asu.edu)
  • In spite of the fact that some people would want to say that you can use somatic cell nuclear transfer and get something other than an embryo - a clonode or whatever they want to call it. (spusa.org)
  • identical
  • The 45-member Council of Europe, the oldest multilateral political organization on the continent, outlawed "[a]ny intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being" by amending its Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine. (publicintegrity.org)
  • if you chop an embryo in two you end up with identical twins, which is exactly how it happens naturally. (slashdot.org)
  • Tetra is a rhesus monkey and the first primate to be "cloned" using a method that splits the original cells in an embryo to make multiple identical animals. (bbc.co.uk)
  • It is a technique that could produce genetically-identical animals for use in studies of human diseases like diabetes and Parkinson's. (bbc.co.uk)
  • At the eight-cell stage, the embryo itself can be split to produce four genetically-identical two-cell embryos. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Only if embryos are produced using the Dolly technique will the animals be genetically identical to another single (adult) individual. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The result is two embryos that are identical in the composition of their genetic material. (jrank.org)
  • It is not necessary to create identical human being for the purpose of experimentation on human beings. (votesmart.org)
  • create
  • The resulting embryos were then used as a source of stem cells, which can be used to create specialised tissue cells for transplant operations. (abc.net.au)
  • Scientists have usually wanted to create cloned embryos to see if they can be grown into tissues to repair damaged human organs. (rediff.com)
  • When couples create embryos and freeze them, and then break up, they must decide what to do with those embryos. (slate.com)
  • The embryo-creation technique is essentially the same as that used to create Dolly the sheep and the many cloned animals that have followed. (kottke.org)
  • This is a case in which one is deliberately setting out to create a human being for the sole purpose of destroying that human being," says Dr. Daniel Sulmasy , a professor of medicine and a bioethicist at the University of Chicago. (kwit.org)
  • Humans are already capable of splicing specific genes from one organism into another to create glowing plants to shelf-stable tomatoes. (ecowho.com)
  • to attempt to create a child by implanting cloned embryos in a woman. (essaypride.com)
  • mammalian
  • From this experiment, Willadsen made viable mammalian embryos using his modified techniques, but they didn't grow into adult organisms. (asu.edu)
  • womb
  • It all starts with creation of the new, cloned embryo, an embryo that could then be used for cell stock or transferred to a womb. (cmda.org)
  • CRISPR
  • The genome editing technique, known as CRISPR, is not new-but using it to change the genetic letters of a human embryo is. (bu.edu)
  • Following rumors that scientists in China had used CRISPR to try to modify the genetics of nonviable human embryos, two US scientific groups called for a moratorium on this use. (bu.edu)
  • In the CRISPR debate, it is generally conceded that the only use for modifying human embryos is to make a better baby (if you have created embryos with severe genetic problems in IVF, the most reasonable strategy is not to use such embryos for reproduction-not to try to edit their genomes in the hope that you will make them better). (bu.edu)
  • unethical
  • Just as importantly, this is also an unethical and unconsented experiment from a societal point of view, because it changes the nature of what it is to be human and what we mean by human evolution. (bu.edu)
  • stem cell
  • Examination of human pluripotent stem cell transcriptomes in this framework identifies culture conditions that sustain a naïve state pertaining to the inner cell mass. (biologists.org)
  • Our approach thus clarifies understanding both of lineage segregation in the early human embryo and of in vitro stem cell identity, and provides an analytical resource for comparative molecular embryology. (biologists.org)