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  • equation
  • When you are solving any problem and trying to use a mass balance or any other equation, it is important to recognize what pieces of information can be interconverted . (wikibooks.org)
  • Most vibrating elements can be represented by a second order mass-spring-damper system governed by the following second order differential equation. (wikipedia.org)
  • displacement
  • m x ¨ + c x ˙ + k x = F ( t ) {\displaystyle m{\ddot {x}}+c{\dot {x}}+kx=F(t)} where, x is the displacement, m is the effective mass, c is the damping coefficient, k is the spring constant of the restoring force, and F(t) is external forcing as a function of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • implies
  • In 1958, Lodewijk Woltjer, working on astrophysical plasmas, noted that H {\displaystyle H} is conserved, which implies that a twisty field will attempt to maintain its twistyness even with external forces being applied to it. (wikipedia.org)
  • equivalent
  • One unified atomic mass unit is approximately the mass of one nucleon (either a single proton or neutron ) and is numerically equivalent to 1 g/mol . (wikipedia.org)
  • quantities
  • If physical quantities have different dimensions (such as length vs. mass), they cannot be expressed in terms of similar units and cannot be compared in quantity (also called incommensurable ). (wikipedia.org)
  • force
  • How can a force that is applied perpendicularly at a point of other than the center of mass cause translational motion? (physicsforums.com)
  • The only force producing a torque about the hinge is gravity, which in this case is treated as if it is applied to the center of mass. (physicsforums.com)
  • length
  • Inclined plane: MA = length of slope ÷ height of the slope Balanced arm lamps Gear ratio Fisher, pp. 69-70. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus
  • Thus, invariant mass is a natural unit of mass used for systems which are being viewed from their center of momentum frame (COM frame), as when any closed system (for example a bottle of hot gas) is weighed, which requires that the measurement be taken in the center of momentum frame where the system has no net momentum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, the mass of a system of several photons moving in different directions is positive, which means that an invariant mass exists for this system even though it does not exist for each photon. (wikipedia.org)
  • depends
  • For standardization, a specific atomic nucleus ( carbon-12 vs. oxygen-16 ) had to be chosen because the average mass of a nucleon depends on the count of the nucleons in the atomic nucleus due to mass defect . (wikipedia.org)
  • vector
  • Systems whose four-momentum is a null vector (for example a single photon or many photons moving in exactly the same direction) have zero invariant mass, and are referred to as massless . (wikipedia.org)
  • atomic mass
  • The unified atomic mass unit or dalton (symbol: u, or Da or AMU) is a standard unit of mass that quantifies mass on an atomic or molecular scale ( atomic mass ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The atomic mass unit ( amu ) without the "unified" prefix is technically an obsolete unit based on oxygen, which was replaced in 1961. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this sense, most uses of the terms atomic mass units and amu , today, actually refer to unified atomic mass unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The atomic mass unit is not the unit of mass in the atomic units system, which is rather the electron rest mass ( m e ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The dalton (Da) is another name for the unified atomic mass unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The unified atomic mass unit and the dalton are different names for the same unit of measure. (wikipedia.org)
  • gravity
  • They can be due to phenomena such as gravity , magnetism , or anything that might cause a mass to accelerate. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • The invariant mass is another name for the rest mass of single particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concept of invariant mass does not require bound systems of particles, however. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same is true for massless particles in such system, which add invariant mass and also rest mass to systems, according to their energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • change
  • Despite this change, modern sources often still use the old term "amu" but define it as u ( 1 / 12 of the mass of a carbon-12 atom), as mentioned in the article's introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • masses
  • Earth mass is a standard unit of mass in astronomy that is used to indicate the masses of other planets, including rocky terrestrial planets and exoplanets. (wikipedia.org)
  • NanoSIMS is able to create nanoscale maps of elemental composition, parallel acquisition of seven masses, isotopic identification , combining the high mass resolution, subparts-per-million sensitivity of conventional SIMS with spatial resolution down to 50 nm and fast acquisition (DC mode, not pulsed). (wikipedia.org)
  • equal
  • Earth mass (M⊕, where ⊕ is the standard astronomical symbol for planet Earth) is the unit of mass equal to that of Earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is also why the mass of a proton or neutron by itself is more than (and not equal to) 1 u. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • citation needed] Measuring of the quantity of electricity (coulombs) is based on the changes of the mass of the mercury electrode. (wikipedia.org)
  • zero
  • [ clarification needed ] For example, rest mass and invariant mass are zero for individual photons even though they may add mass to the invariant mass of systems. (wikipedia.org)