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  • influenza
  • Illustration of an influenza virus attaching to a cell membrane: Professor Louise Ryan is working with CSIRO to distinguish cases of the flu from other disease events. (terradaily.com)
  • Using this technique, they were able to predict influenza outbreaks in the U.S., Poland, Japan and Thailand, the spread of dengue in Brazil, and a spike in the number of tuberculosis cases in Thailand. (ibtimes.com)
  • This info comes shortly after the CDC announced a whooping cough outbreak , as well as reports that another influenza - bird flu - is making seals sick. (villagevoice.com)
  • In the event of an influenza pandemic or other communicable disease situation, [Name of Company] may implement these social distancing guidelines to minimize the spread of the influenza and other communicable diseases among the staff. (shrm.org)
  • The intermittent spread to humans will continue, and the virus will continue to evolve.Map As of the July 25, 2008 FAO Avian Influenza Disease Emergency Situation Update, H5N1 pathogenicity is continuing to gradually rise in endemic areas but the avian influenza disease situation in farmed birds is being held in check by vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Country-specific totals of cases and deaths kept current by the WHO may be viewed by clicking through the links provided at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/country/en/ Epidemic and Pandemic Alert and Response (EPR) Confirmed Human Cases of Avian Influenza A(H5N1) A strain of H5N1 killed chickens in 1959 in Scotland and turkeys in 1991 in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Swine influenza (swine flu or pig flu) is a respiratory disease that occurs in pigs that is caused by the Influenza A virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Spanish flu, also known as la grippe, La Gripe EspaƱola, or La Pesadilla, was an unusually severe and deadly strain of swine influenza, a viral infectious disease, that killed some 50 to 100 million people worldwide over about a year in 1918 and 1919. (wikipedia.org)
  • swine flu
  • Apple iPhone owners wondering if there is a case of swine flu nearby can now find out instantly with a new program that tracks outbreaks of infectious diseases. (newsmax.com)
  • The application, which was developed with support from Google.org, the Web giant's philanthropic arm, enables users to track and report outbreaks of infectious diseases such as swine flu in real time. (newsmax.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control has reported that there's been an outbreak of swine flu strain - with 145 diagnosed cases since July 12, the Los Angeles Times notes . (villagevoice.com)
  • Nobody has died from this year's outbreak (H3N2v) and even though swine flu sucks, it's a lot like the regular flu (coughing, sneezing, fever, chills, etc.) - so you would probably wind up alright unless you have a weakened immune system. (villagevoice.com)
  • Complicating the situation was a fear among the public that the original cluster of 14 cases, six of whom died all within days of each other, represented an outbreak of swine flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • On April 28, 2009, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first official US death of swine flu, a 23-month-old toddler from Mexico who died on April 27 while visiting Texas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acting director of the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said that preliminary tests on seven out of fourteen samples from patients in Mexico had matched the virus found in the US, which experts say is a new strain of swine flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • water outbreaks
  • Drinking water outbreaks associated with surface water decreased from 31.8% during 1995--1996 to 11.8% during 1997--1998. (cdc.gov)
  • Efforts by CDC to address recreational water outbreaks have included meetings with the recreational water industry, focus groups to educate parents on prevention of waterborne disease transmission in recreational water settings, and publications with guidelines for parents and pool operators. (cdc.gov)
  • Although initially designed to collect data about drinking water outbreaks in the United States, WBDOSS now includes outbreaks associated with recreational water, as well as outbreaks associated with water that is not intended for drinking (non-recreational) and water for which the intended use is unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mounted an unprecedented investigation and, by September, the focus had shifted from outside causes, such as a disease carrier, to the hotel environment itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 31 January in the village of Gramatikovo, Malko Tarnovo Municipality, which is located in the 10 km prevention zone around the first two outbreaks, a new outbreak was discovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • As described by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these include the following: Identify the existence of the outbreak (Is the group of ill persons normal for the time of year, geographic area, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study hypotheses (collect data and perform analysis) Refine hypothesis and carry out further study Develop and implement control and prevention systems Release findings to greater communities The order of the above steps and relative amount of effort and resources used in each varies from outbreak to outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • On May 24, 2006, Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, estimated that there had been "at least three. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overall, his research agenda aims to facilitate the control and prevention of disease through better epidemiologic understanding of factors influencing disease risk, improved practice of public health and engaging the public around critical health issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia page views could, in the future, become an important tool in predicting disease outbreaks, according to the findings of a new study published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. (ibtimes.com)
  • The research, carried out by a group of data scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, argued that Wikipedia traffic data could also be used to estimate the current rates of disease outbreaks across the world. (ibtimes.com)
  • The team of scientists tracked the progress of seven diseases across 11 countries -- using language as an approximate measure for people's locations -- between 2010 and 2013, and compared page views on Wikipedia articles about those diseases with data obtained from health ministries. (ibtimes.com)
  • The researchers claimed that Wikipedia is the best bet to create an Internet-based model to predict outbreaks because data on Wikipedia page views are publicly available. (ibtimes.com)
  • However, the Wikipedia-based model was not successful in predicting the spread of slow-progressing diseases like HIV/AIDS, according to the paper. (ibtimes.com)
  • Legionnaires
  • The first reported outbreak was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1976 during a Legionnaires Convention at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent research study provided evidence that Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, can travel airborne at least 6 km from its source. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2000, ASHRAE issued guidelines to maintain water systems and to decrease the chances of Legionnaires' disease transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, there were two outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in the Bronx, New York City, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legionnaires Disease is an acute type of pneumonia that is caused by the inhalation of water vapor containing the Legionella bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2015, Legionnaires' disease sickened 8 people near Co-op City's cooling towers, also in the Bronx. (wikipedia.org)
  • In total, 12 people were diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease between December 2014 and the end of the outbreak in January 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • officials
  • This paper addresses an important question - just how much information about an outbreak can we reliably derive from genomic data alone - and gives public health officials a new tool for their detective kits," according to authors Jennifer Gardy, Caroline Colijn, and Xavier Didelot. (eurekalert.org)
  • SEATTLE (AP) - Public health officials are becoming increasingly concerned about a variety of outbreaks of serious infectious diseases among people who are homeless in Seattle and throughout King County. (q13fox.com)
  • Health officials also are monitoring a potential outbreak of hepatitis A, a potentially fatal disease that spread in San Diego. (q13fox.com)
  • Public health officials and the media may frame messaging about the outbreak around an infected subset of the population, which squanders time that could be spent containing transmission. (psmag.com)
  • Following the Morrisania outbreak, city officials stated that they would be pursuing new regulations for cooling towers. (wikipedia.org)
  • pandemic
  • Japan has inoculated 6,000 health care workers with a pre-pandemic vaccine, and is planning how to proceed with widespread vaccinations, particularly workers who would provide utilities during an outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • parasites
  • All outbreaks of gastroenteritis attributed to parasites in recreational water were caused by Cryptosporidium , 90% occurred in treated water venues (e.g., swimming pools and decorative fountains), and fecal accidents were usually suspected. (cdc.gov)
  • In order for a waterborne disease outbreak to be included in WBDOSS there must be an epidemiologic link between two or more persons that includes a location of water exposure, a clearly defined time period for the water exposure, and one or more waterborne illnesses caused by pathogens such as bacteria, parasites and viruses, or by chemicals/toxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Africa
  • Serological evidence indicates additional human exposure and/or presence in some mosquito species between 1951 and 1981 in parts of Africa (Uganda and Tanzania having the first detection of antibody in humans, in 1952, followed by isolation of the virus from a young girl in Nigeria in 1954 during an outbreak of jaundice, and experimental infection in a human volunteer in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • Janeiro
  • There was a serious outbreak in Rio de Janeiro in February 2002 affecting around one million people and killing sixteen. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Common source - All victims acquire the infection from the same source (e.g. a contaminated water supply).Continuous source - Common source outbreak where the exposure occurs over multiple incubation periods Point source - Common source outbreak where the exposure occurs in less than one incubation period Propagated - Transmission occurs from person to person. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease more commonly occurs in winter months. (wikipedia.org)
  • It often occurs in outbreaks, especially among those living in close quarters. (wikipedia.org)
  • initially
  • The outbreak was initially recognized on 11 September by local authorities and confirmed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially called novel coronavirus 2012 or simply novel coronavirus, it was first reported in 2012 after genome sequencing of a virus isolated from sputum samples from a person who fell ill in a 2012 outbreak of a new flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, the disease appears as small purple or red brown flecks with a faint chlorotic halo on the leaf surface, which coalesce to form bright yellow pustules. (wikipedia.org)
  • viruses
  • Many people in outbreaks are not virally tested, therefore their infections may also be due to chikungunya, a coinfection of both, or even other similar viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990s
  • While avian flu has been a prominent public health issue since the 1990s, ongoing outbreaks have never been so widely spread around the world - something infectious disease experts put down to greater resilience of strains currently circulating, rather than improved detection or reporting. (perelandra-ltd.com)
  • pinpoint
  • Children's Hospital Boston, said in a press release, said it can pinpoint outbreaks reported in the vicinity of a user and let them search for additional information by location or disease. (newsmax.com)
  • University of Guelph researchers have received a $375,000 Health Canada grant to develop a database program to help pinpoint causes of disease outbreaks. (uoguelph.ca)
  • infection
  • Isolation halted the transmission of infection, and entire groups were spared from the scourge of the disease. (psmag.com)
  • Last year, an expert from the CDC National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases (NCEZID) found himself in an unlikely position: guest starring on a popular Navajo language radio program to field questions about hantavirus infection. (cdc.gov)
  • There are several outbreak patterns, which can be useful in identifying the transmission method or source, and predicting the future rate of infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • deadly
  • Diarrheal diseases-Contaminated drinking water and a disrupted sanitation system could mean rampant spread of these water-borne illnesses, which can be especially deadly in children. (pbs.org)
  • viral
  • Agents are worrying about a viral outbreak. (americanthinker.com)
  • The country's Director General of Health, Alexis Elira Dokekias, said more than 900 people have been confirmed infected with the viral disease, AfricaNews reported Monday. (upi.com)
  • fatal
  • Exclusion from the program requires that the conscript fall under one of the following ten categories: Insanity Physically disabled Being held under preventive detention (such as the Internal Security Act) Undergoing drug rehabilitation Detained by the Children's Act of 2001 (Act 612) Fatal disease or condition, as confirmed by a medical officer. (wikipedia.org)
  • spread
  • THE Department of Homeland Security confirmed last week that the highly contagious foot-and-mouth virus had briefly spread within the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in two previously undisclosed incidents earlier this summer. (nytimes.com)
  • North Coast Local Land Services district veterinarian, Ian Poe, said: "The aim of the PIC system is to help trace back the source, and contain the potential spread, of disease outbreaks such as horse flu or Hendra virus. (northernstar.com.au)
  • Verify the diagnosis related to the outbreak Create a case definition to define who/what is included as a case Map the spread of the outbreak using Information technology as diagnosis is reported to insurance Develop a hypothesis (What appears to be causing the outbreak? (wikipedia.org)