• Post-mortem findings in rabies have demonstrated a profound lack of B cell activation in both humans and animals. (erasmusmc.nl)
  • HSV-1 and VZV), life-threatening encephalitis (HSV-1 and VZV) or potentially Alzheimer's disease (HSV-1) and Multiple Sclerosis (EBV). (erasmusmc.nl)
  • The aim of this research line is to develop more appropriate animal models and novel human in vitro CNS/PNS models, including human fetal and adult organotypic sensory ganglion and brain slice cultures, to elucidate the pathological attributes of both virus and host in viral CNS disease. (erasmusmc.nl)
  • The overall aim of this research line is to decrease the impact of virus-induced neurological diseases through detailed knowledge of the complex tripartite interaction between viruses, the human nervous system and the immune system. (erasmusmc.nl)
  • Upon validation of the novel models by comparison with affected nervous tissues of patients with virus-induced CNS disease, they will be used as pre-clinical models to test the efficacy and safety of promising novel antiviral and neuroprotective therapies. (erasmusmc.nl)
  • Animal models of Parkinson's disease. (nih.gov)
  • Millions of people suffer from Parkinson's disease, a disorder of the nervous system that affects movement and worsens over time. (scienceblog.com)
  • The protein, which has been found to be common to all patients with Parkinson's, is thought to be a pathway to the disease when it binds together in "clumps," or aggregates, and becomes toxic, killing the brain's neurons. (scienceblog.com)
  • There are currently more than 30 diseases with no cure that are caused by protein aggregation and the resulting toxicity to the brain or other organs, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. (scienceblog.com)
  • Using a transgenic zebrafish model for Parkinson's disease, the researchers added CLR01 and used fluorescent proteins to track the tweezer's effect on the aggregations. (scienceblog.com)
  • The researchers are already studying CLR01 in a mouse model of Parkinson's and say they hope this will lead to human clinical trials. (scienceblog.com)
  • PITTSBURGH, June 15, 2015 - Gene therapy to reduce production of a brain protein successfully prevented development of Parkinson's disease in an animal study, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scientists have observed dysfunction of mitochondria, which make energy for cells, in Parkinson's disease, as well as Lewy bodies, which are characteristic clumps of the cellular protein α-synuclein within neurons, said principal investigator Edward A. Burton, M.D., D.Phil. (eurekalert.org)
  • Until now, these have been pursued largely as separate lines of research in Parkinson's disease," Dr. Burton said. (eurekalert.org)
  • The team wanted to see what would happen if they knocked out the production of α-synuclein in the brain's substantia nigra, home to the dopamine-producing cells that are lost as Parkinson's disease progresses. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our previous work established that rotenone exposure in rats reproduces many features of Parkinson's disease that we see in humans, including movement problems, Lewy bodies, loss of dopamine neurons and mitochondrial dysfunction," explained co-investigator J. Timothy Greenamyre, M.D., Ph.D., Love Family Professor of Neurology, and director of the Pittsburgh Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases at Pitt. (eurekalert.org)
  • The viral vector AAV2 has been used safely in Parkinson's disease patients in clinical trials, so the gene therapy approach might be feasible," Dr. Burton said. (eurekalert.org)
  • We think targeting α-synuclein has great potential to protect the brain from neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • Earlier studies by Kazantsev's group and others showed that inhibiting SIRT2 (sirtuin-2 deacetylase) protected against neuronal damage in cellular and animal models of HD and Parkinson's disease - both of which are characterized by the buildup of abnormal proteins in the brain - and in other neurodegenerative disorders. (massgeneral.org)
  • Sustained neuroinflammation mediated by resident microglia is recognized as a key pathophysiological contributor to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), but the key molecular signaling events regulating persistent microglial activation have yet to be clearly defined. (jneurosci.org)
  • SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex multifactorial disease characterized by the progressive loss of midbrain dopamine neurons. (jneurosci.org)
  • Bertoli-Avella AM, Oostra BA, Heutink P (2004) Chasing genes in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. (springer.com)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by well-defined motor symptoms, the most striking of which is bradykinesia. (criver.com)
  • Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. (epfl.ch)
  • Researchers at UCLA have developed a molecular compound that improves balance and coordination in mice with early stage Parkinson's disease. (ucla.edu)
  • Parkinson's disease is a nervous system disorder that affects movement. (ucla.edu)
  • CLR01 previously showed a strong therapeutic effect in a zebrafish model of Parkinson's. (ucla.edu)
  • This work was supported by multiple funding agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, RJG Foundation, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, Team Parkinson/Parkinson Alliance, the American Parkinson's Disease Association, and gifts to the Center for the Study of Parkinson's Disease at UCLA. (ucla.edu)
  • In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. (frontiersin.org)
  • Firstly there are the disorders which involve a loss of cells in defined subsets of the brain, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). (frontiersin.org)
  • Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder (AD is the most common) and the most common movement disorder. (frontiersin.org)
  • Whereas mouse PSC-derived DA neurons have shown efficacy in models of Parkinson's disease3,4, DA neurons from human PSCs generally show poorin vivoperformance5. (ovid.com)
  • Extensive molecular profiling, biochemical and electrophysiological data define developmental progression and confirm identity of PSC-derived midbrain DA neurons.In vivosurvival and function is demonstrated in Parkinson's disease models using three host species. (ovid.com)
  • Excellent DA neuron survival, function and lack of neural overgrowth in the three animal models indicate promise for the development of cell-based therapies in Parkinson's disease. (ovid.com)
  • Most of the hypokinetic syndromes are associated with the neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease (PD). (frontiersin.org)
  • Scientists in the Neurodegeneration division interrogate how neurones live, die and can be rescued to improve brain function in degenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Motor Neuron Diseases. (edu.au)
  • Background: The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive despite identification of several genetic mutations. (harvard.edu)
  • Here we report that inflammation can trigger degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. (harvard.edu)
  • Methods: We examined the effects of inflammation on the progressive 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease using immunohistochemistry, multiplex ELISA, and cell counting stereology. (harvard.edu)
  • To receive news and publication updates for International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major causative disease of dementia and is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of senile plaques (SPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. (mdpi.com)
  • While this Insight will be discussing the role of ApoE in CVD, this protein also plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease as it is the principal transporter of cholesterol in the brain. (taconic.com)
  • ApoE4 - Allelic frequency of 15 - 20% 3 - has been implicated in atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, and contributes to increased serum cholesterol levels and the development of CVD 5 , 6 . (taconic.com)
  • Another aim of this study was to explore the cytoprotective potential of IR1072 in conjunction with Alzheimer's disease-related insults. (bl.uk)
  • Previous studies have indicated that adult neurogenesis is disturbed in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and animal models. (ssrn.com)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) ranks as a leading cause of death among the progressive neurodegenerative diseases. (springer.com)
  • Arnold SE, Hyman BT, Flory J, Damasio AR, Van Hoesen GW (1991) The topographical and neuroanatomical distribution of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Auffret A, Gautheron V, Repici M, Kraftsik R, Mount HT, Mariani J, Rovira C (2009) Age-dependent impairment of spine morphology and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 neurons of a presenilin 1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Ballatore C, Lee VM, Trojanowski JQ (2007) Tau-mediated neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. (springer.com)
  • Billings LM, Oddo S, Green KN, McGaugh JL, LaFerla FM (2005) Intraneuronal abeta causes the onset of early Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits in transgenic mice. (springer.com)
  • Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have discovered that an FDA-approved anti-epileptic drug reverses memory loss and alleviates other Alzheimer's-related impairments in an animal model of the disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Scientists in the laboratory of Lennart Mucke, MD, who directs neurological research at Gladstone, conducted the research on mice genetically modified to simulate key aspects of Alzheimer's disease . (medicalxpress.com)
  • For the millions of people suffering from Alzheimer's worldwide, we have no effective drug to prevent or reverse memory loss the hallmark symptom of this ultimately fatal disease," said Dr. Mucke, who is also a professor of neurology and neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with which Gladstone is affiliated. (medicalxpress.com)
  • So we screened seven FDA -approved anti-epileptic medications including levetiracetam in our Alzheimer's mouse model to see if minimizing these network disruptions could improve memory. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The relevance of this discovery to people with Alzheimer's disease is underscored by research that scientists at Johns Hopkins University published just a few months ago. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Still, further research is required before the drug is prescribed for Alzheimer's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have unraveled a process by which depletion of a specific protein in the brain contributes to the memory problems associated with Alzheimer's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • A cholesterol drug commonly prescribed to reduce cardiovascular disease risk restores blood vessel function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study in the April 4 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related dementia, with the number of affected individuals expected to exceed 100 million worldwide by 2050. (edu.au)
  • In Australia, Alzheimer's disease is the third leading cause of death behind heart disease and cancer. (edu.au)
  • Despite the significance of this disease there are currently no disease modifying drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. (edu.au)
  • One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the cerebral deposition of plaques composed of Amyloid-beta (Aß) peptide. (edu.au)
  • Clearance of Aß is slowed in cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer's disease patients, which likely contributes to its pathological deposition. (edu.au)
  • Objective Cerebral amyloidosis and severe tauopathy in the brain are key pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (bmj.com)
  • Recent findings demonstrated the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). (thescipub.com)
  • Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a significant pathological feature in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). (uzh.ch)
  • Animal models of cardiovascular disease have proved critically important for the discovery of pathophysiological mechanisms and for the advancement of. (molecularstation.com)
  • The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a meeting of investigators on September 21-22, 2006, in Bethesda, Maryland, to evaluate evidence for a pathogenetic link between COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and cardiovascular disease and to recommend future research that may be needed to clarify this relationship and to translate this understanding into better approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiopulmonary disease. (nih.gov)
  • Experts in cardiovascular disease and COPD were brought together for this working group. (nih.gov)
  • It was acknowledged that cardiovascular disease plays a major role in COPD, being responsible for the death of more than 30% of these patients. (nih.gov)
  • The general consensus was that the mechanisms behind the association of cardiovascular disease and COPD need to be further investigated at the epidemiological, patho-biological, and clinical levels. (nih.gov)
  • Analyses of existing data and new population-based epidemiological data are needed to clarify the relationship between cardiovascular disease and COPD, including the cardiovascular association with pulmonary function measures (e.g. (nih.gov)
  • Studies are needed to assess the common mechanisms by which immune responses and inflammation may contribute to cardiovascular disease and COPD. (nih.gov)
  • Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a term that encompasses multiple heart and blood-vessel-related maladies. (taconic.com)
  • Obesity is associated with a number of health problems that are often summarized together as metabolic syndrome and involve the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and fatty liver disease [ 1 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • The leading cause of death worldwide is cardiovascular disease, but infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of death in infants and children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Disease Models & Mechanisms. (biologists.org)
  • Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see the Disease Models & Mechanisms web site. (biologists.org)
  • Interaction between NAFLD and obesity still needs further clarification, and it is necessary to dertemine the mechanisms of these disorders in animal models of disease. (intechopen.com)
  • Thus, it is important to evaluate different animal models of obesity able to induce the profile of NAFLD and NASH disease in humans, assessing their mechanisms of action. (intechopen.com)
  • In the present study, we examined the role of Fyn, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, in microglial activation and neuroinflammatory mechanisms in cell culture and animal models of PD. (jneurosci.org)
  • During the past decade, researchers have also made remarkable progress in identifying genes responsible for inherited forms of Parkinson s disease, with the expectation that understanding the function of these genes will elucidate mechanisms behind sporadic Parkinson s disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. (wingsforlife.com)
  • These viral models provide valuable insights into Parkinson disease mechanisms, help to identify therapeutic targets and may contribute to the development of therapeutic approaches. (epfl.ch)
  • These models have been developed in many species in the attempt to undercover the complex nature of the disease mechanisms involved. (iospress.nl)
  • The second section presents the use of animal models to pinpoint disease mechanisms, and the last part of the handbook examines the various therapeutic interventions being used in models of neurodegenerative disease. (iospress.nl)
  • As such, while the current models are well suited for the study of specific pathology-driven mechanisms, more notably amyloid-β, tau, or alpha-synuclein, pharmacological testing in animal models of neurodegenerative disease often translates into poorer indices of efficacy when applied to the clinical population. (iospress.nl)
  • With these advances and challenges in mind, this handbook, written by experts in the field of neurodegeneration, provides a rich and updated overview of a wide range of animal models that are being developed and used to study complex disease dynamics, including but also beyond pathology-associated mechanisms, with the ultimate goal to discover the neuroprotective therapeutics of the future through more accurate translation of basic to clinical outputs. (iospress.nl)
  • The second section of this handbook presents the use of animal models to pinpoint disease mechanisms. (iospress.nl)
  • Animal models for inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis are widely accepted and frequently used to identify pathological mechanisms and validate novel therapeutic strategies. (bmj.com)
  • In this study, we intend to assess the relationship between CDs and radiation exposure by animal model studies and to obtain information about biological mechanisms. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Moreover, growing evidence suggests that there are several connections between the neuropathology that underlies AD and DM, and there is evidence that the experimental induction of DM can cause cognitive dysfunction, even in rodent animal models. (mdpi.com)
  • In interpreting the experimental results, the limitations of those animal models should be considered. (wiley.com)
  • This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuro-immuneinteractions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines. (wingsforlife.com)
  • Of interest here is a broad spectrum of tools and techniques for molecular, chemical, and biological measurements and procedures which are relevant to the care of and to experimental protocols involving research animal models. (sbir.gov)
  • In the current review, we provide a comprehensive summary of mostly used experimental models of chronic liver disease, starting from early stages of fatty liver disease (non-alcoholic and alcoholic) to steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease, advanced cirrhosis and end-stage primary liver cancer. (onmedica.com)
  • References of experimental use of animals to model diseases, novel experimental procedures, or test novel therapeutics date all the way back to 304-258 BCE. (iospress.nl)
  • Furthermore, once a decision to proceed with research is made, it is the researcher's responsibility to ensure that the animals' w- fare is of prime concern in terms of appropriate housing, feeding, and maximum reduction of any uncomfortable or distressing effects of the experimental conditions, and that these conditions undergo frequent formalized monitoring. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Naturally-occurring or experimentally-induced animal diseases with pathological processes analogous to human diseases. (nih.gov)
  • They are used as study models for human diseases. (molecularstation.com)
  • Repetitive dosing in some models has more closely mimicked the pathology of human fibrotic lung disease. (nih.gov)
  • Roy Kupsinel, M.D. once announced that "animal experimentation produces a lot of misleading and confusing data which poses hazards to human health. (brightkite.com)
  • Large animal models, such as domesticated farm animals, offer some distinct advantages over rodent models, including a larger brain that is amenable to imaging and intracerebral therapy, longer lifespan, and a more human-like neuro-architecture. (medindia.net)
  • highlight the development of a transgenic minipig HD model that expresses a human mutant huntingtin (HTT) fragment through the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues and manifests neurochemical and reproductive changes with age. (medindia.net)
  • Not only does a rodent's small brain often preclude the use of advanced neuroimaging techniques, it is also not clear how intracerebral application of trophic factors, transplant therapies, and gene therapies in small animals might translate to the much larger human brain. (medindia.net)
  • Importantly, the brains of large animals can be studied using sensitive measures that should be highly translatable to the human condition, including MRI and PET imaging, EEG, and electrophysiology, as well as behavioral tests looking at motor and cognitive function," says Professor Jenny Morton, PhD, of the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge. (medindia.net)
  • The present invention concerns non-human transgenic animals that are useful as models of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. (google.com)
  • The other, called 140 CAG Htt knock-in, is genetically closer to the human disease. (massgeneral.org)
  • The golden rule in the HD field for identifying compounds that could work in patients is showing efficacy in a robust HD model like R6/2 and in the more genetically accurate to human disease 140 CAG Htt knock-in model," says Kazantsev, an associate professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. (massgeneral.org)
  • Animal models are used by scientists to replicate human diseases in another living animal, allowing them to study the biology of the disease and test potential treatments. (understandinganimalresearch.org.uk)
  • They illustrate the methodology used with examples from recent research literature on human and infectious disease modeling, showing how such techniques can be used in practice. (dymocks.com.au)
  • In conjunction, these models reflect the diversity and utility of tools used to study human disease. (indigo.ca)
  • The two studies were performed with the fruit fly Drosophila, a widely used model organism for studies of human disease, and shed new light on biological connections between inherited and sporadic forms of Parkinson s disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • The model predicts the number of people with the disease will double from 195,125 to 406,725 by 2070 due to climate change and growing human population. (org.in)
  • They said the model could be refined to consider zoonotic disease transmission within human populations by including the impact of travel infrastructure, human-to-human contact rates and poverty-factors that would have been of use in the Ebola and Zika outbreaks. (org.in)
  • The mission of the 7th Aquatic Animal Mod-els of Human Disease Conference is to provide scientists using aquatic animal models a unique opportunity to exchange scientific information, identify research tools and opportunities, address environmental health issues, and encourage the utility of aquatic models for the study of human disease. (xenbase.org)
  • This venue will encourage development of an appreciation of aquatic animal models and their contributions to understanding human disease. (xenbase.org)
  • We hope to see you at the 7th Aquatic Animal Models of Human Disease Conference as it returns to Texas. (xenbase.org)
  • Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: from animal disease models to human trials. (wingsforlife.com)
  • Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). (wingsforlife.com)
  • The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The NIH supports animal models and related materials that are central to understanding basic biological processes and improving human health. (sbir.gov)
  • Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. (frontiersin.org)
  • This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. (frontiersin.org)
  • Additionally, current and prospect human tissue bioengineered models are summarized. (onmedica.com)
  • The NIH supports animal models and related materials that are central to both understanding basic biological processes and for developing applications directly related to improving human health. (nih.gov)
  • However, when the distress, discomfort, or pain to the animals outweighs the anticipated gains for human welfare, then the research is not ethical and should not be carried out. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Cotton rats are an important animal model to study infectious diseases because of their unique susceptibility towards human pathogens. (osu.edu)
  • Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus): an animal model for respiratory tract infections with human pathogens. (osu.edu)
  • Dr. Anand was motivated to work on the human brain model after his attempts with animals to develop a drug for autism yielded disappointing results. (all-creatures.org)
  • The power of this brain model bodes very well for human health because it gives us better and more relevant options to test and develop therapeutics other than rodents, he said. (all-creatures.org)
  • About the size of a pencil eraser, the model was created by reprogramming adult human skin cells into stem cells that subsequently could be engineered into neural cells. (all-creatures.org)
  • They cause intense suffering and death for animals and overall have not yielded significant results for human disease. (all-creatures.org)
  • Reducing reliance on animals improves research as they're 'not as likely to predict clinical outcomes as human brain models. (all-creatures.org)
  • The need to provide in vivo complex environments to understand human diseases strongly relies on the use of animal models, which traditionally include small rodents and rabbits. (spectroscopynow.com)
  • There is a great need for new animal species that are naturally endowed with specific features relevant to human diseases. (spectroscopynow.com)
  • There is an ample scope for the application of proteomic techniques in farm animals, and the establishment of several proteomic maps of plasma and tissue has clearly demonstrated that farm animals provide a disease environment that closely resembles that of human diseases. (spectroscopynow.com)
  • Additionally, we summarise current and prospective models based on human tissue bioengineering. (ucm.es)
  • These findings in animal model of chronic GVHD are useful for analyzing some aspects of pathology on human ocular chronic GVHD. (arvojournals.org)
  • Frank Conlon, PhD, co-led a study showing which proteins and pathways are conserved in four major animal models and humans, providing insights into which models are best for specific research of human disease. (unchealthcare.org)
  • Yet little is known about the proteins and cellular pathways that lead to the formation of the human heart or the roles various proteins and pathways might play in cardiac disease. (unchealthcare.org)
  • Now, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Princeton University scientists have found that unique sets of proteins and pathways present in specific animal models commonly used in research are also present and mutated in human disease. (unchealthcare.org)
  • Conlon, who is a member of the UNC McAllister Heart Institute, and Ileana Cristea, PhD, at Princeton University, led experiments to define the protein composition of four model vertebrates that are used to study human heart disease: two frog species, the mouse, and the pig. (unchealthcare.org)
  • But to their surprise, Conlon and Cristea's labs found that each species shares a unique set of proteins with humans, and that these proteins are mutated in human disease states. (unchealthcare.org)
  • The projectinvolves novel human and animal models for neurodevelopmental disorders caused by mutation of the synaptic release machinery, as well as systematic comparison to human patient and EEG data. (dsfn.dk)
  • A more up-to-date version of this article which lists more diseases can be found here: List of Chronic Human Diseases Linked to Infectious Pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheep live long enough that the time available for studying progressive neurological diseases such as HD is much greater than is possible in rodents. (medindia.net)
  • In both models, the mutated huntingtin gene contains extended repeats of the nucleotide triplet CAG, leading to development of HD-like motor symptoms and the same type of brain damage seen in the devastating neurological disorder. (massgeneral.org)
  • In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. (frontiersin.org)
  • These and other neurological diseases do not naturally occur in animals. (all-creatures.org)
  • A new opossum model has been developed to mimic nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which resembles alcoholic liver disease but occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol. (understandinganimalresearch.org.uk)
  • To date, viral PD models comprise α-synuclein and LRRK-2-based overexpression models, as well as models that mimic parkin loss of function by overexpression of the parkin substrates Pael-R, CDCrel-1, p38/JTV or synphilin-1. (epfl.ch)
  • The vast number of murine models available encompasses a wide variety of immune disorders - from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis. (brightkite.com)
  • Eur J Pediatr Surg DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694745Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is caused by incomplete colonization of enteric neural crest-derived cell (ENCC) in the bowel, the failure of ENCCs to proliferate, differentiate, and migrate leads to an absence of enteric neurons in the distal colon, resulting in colonic motility dysfunction. (medworm.com)
  • Dysfunction or death of specific neuronal populations most at risk for dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases is not mediated solely by the expression of the mutant protein within target neurons ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • We are now building on these findings and working to identify the precise mechanism by which this drug reduces brain-network dysfunction and improves memory in our mouse models," said Dr. Sanchez. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The Mitochondrial Research Society estimates that more than 50 million adults in the U.S. suffer from diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction is involved and that mitochondrial dysfunction is found in a broad spectrum of diseases - from diabetes and infertility to cancer and age-related neurodegenerative disorders (see http://www.mitoresearch.org). (taylorfrancis.com)
  • AbstractAnimal models of autoimmune disease have been of vital importance in the advancement of our understanding of central pathological processes that underlie disease causation. (brightkite.com)
  • In this chapter, representative animal models for AD research and their pathological and behavioral features are described. (springer.com)
  • Neuroinflammation, marked by gliosis and infiltrating T cells, is a prominent pathological feature in diverse models of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases. (pnas.org)
  • Translating preclinical results for gene-based therapies from rodent models to larger-brained models of HD is an important step along the path toward clinical testing. (medindia.net)
  • These new approaches require more sophisticated tools to investigate the impact of therapy in rodent models. (criver.com)
  • The zebrafish is a popular animal for research because it is easily manipulated genetically, develops rapidly and is transparent, making the measurement of biological processes easier. (scienceblog.com)
  • This model system aided in establishing pathways essential for biological effects of IR1072, demonstrating the importance of HSF1 driven pathways, in particular those requiring HSP70. (bl.uk)
  • In each of the eight chapters, they deal with a specific modeling approach or set of techniques designed to capture a particular biological factor. (dymocks.com.au)
  • Biodefense: Research Methodology and Animal Models, edited by James R. Swearengen, is a timely and invaluable reference for those performing animal experimentation to develop medical countermeasures and diagnostics against infectious agents and toxins identified as potential biological weapons. (cdc.gov)
  • It clearly and concisely provides extensive details about the animal models, both past and present, that have been used to investigate a selected number of disease processes caused by exposure to plausible biological threat agents. (cdc.gov)
  • ORIP-funded resources support the development, characterization, preservation and distribution of high quality animal models and biological materials that are used by investigators in all disciplines of biomedical research. (sbir.gov)
  • The animal models and biological materials to be developed must address the research interests of two or more of the categorical NIH Institutes and Centers. (sbir.gov)
  • The Division of Comparative Medicine (DCM), Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP), supports Resources that create, develop, preserve and supply a variety of high-quality animal models and related biological materials to the biomedical community. (nih.gov)
  • DCM-supported Resources and the research community will benefit from development and commercialization of technologies that support the husbandry, characterization, improvement and use of animal models and related biological materials. (nih.gov)
  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages small business concerns to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose innovative approaches to further develop, improve and facilitate the use of animal models and related biological materials to meet new biomedical challenges related to improvements in the health of humans and animals. (nih.gov)
  • The Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) supports research-related resources that create, develop, preserve and supply a variety of high-quality animal models, and related biological materials. (nih.gov)
  • Parkinson s disease occurs both sporadically and as a result of inheritance of single gene mutations. (innovations-report.com)
  • Betts V, Leissring MA, Dolios G, Wang R, Selkoe DJ, Walsh DM (2008) Aggregation and catabolism of disease-associated intra-Abeta mutations: reduced proteolysis of AbetaA21G by neprilysin. (springer.com)
  • Dominant mutations in the Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ superoxide dismutase (mSOD1) gene are the most frequent cause of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an inexorably progressive and fatal neuromuscular disease, and current evidence suggests that motoneuron injury is non− cell-autonomous and involves damage caused by mSOD1 proteins within glia of the central nervous system (CNS) ( 1 - 4 ). (pnas.org)
  • 1-7 STGD1 has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance associated with disease-causing mutations in the ABCA4 gene. (bmj.com)
  • They delivered the gene therapy to the brains of rats and then exposed the animals to the pesticide rotenone, which inhibits mitochondrial function. (eurekalert.org)
  • Diversifying animal models: the use of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus in infectious diseases. (osu.edu)
  • The findings from these interviews suggest that rat owners construct their pets as different from wild rats, and by elevating the rat to the status of a pet, the powerful associations that rats have with dirt and disease are removed. (animalsandsociety.org)
  • Inflammation and excessive fibrosis are prominent histologic features of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). (arvojournals.org)
  • These results demonstrate for the first time in a model of chronic neurodegeneration that morphological activation of microglia and astroglia does not predict glial function, and that the presence of CD4+ T cells provides supportive neuroprotection by modulating the trophic/cytotoxic balance of glia. (pnas.org)
  • Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease affecting 700,000 people in the United States. (spie.org)
  • Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD), once thought to be a degenerative disease, is now recognized to be an active pathobiological process, with chronic inflammation emerging as a predominant, and possibly driving, factor. (hindawi.com)
  • Over the course of the disease, chronic synovitis (inflammation of the synovial lining of joints, tendon sheaths or bursae with a infiltration of macrophages, T-cells, polymorphs, etc.) leads to erosions of normal articular tissue. (brightkite.com)
  • Histopathologically, Boma disease often goes along with a non-purulent inflammation of the brain and the spinal cord. (scialert.net)
  • Unfortunately, many publications reporting on these animal studies lack detailed description and appropriate assessment of the distinct histopathological features of arthritis: joint inflammation, cartilage damage and bone erosion. (bmj.com)
  • Fibroblasts originated from circulating donor-derived precursors may participate in the excessive fibrosis in animal model of ocular chronic GVHD. (arvojournals.org)
  • This indicates a strong need for highly predictive in vitro and in vivo models. (springer.com)
  • The in vivo experiments employ animal models including vertebrates (zebrafish, rodents, rabbits, and primates) and invertebrates (fruit flies and nematodes) for drug screening. (springer.com)
  • We think it self-e- dent, however, that humans can only be experimented upon in severely proscribed circumstances and alternative pro- dures using cell or tissue culture are inadequate in any models requiring assessments of behavioral change or of complex in vivo processes. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Further understanding of the pathogenicity of autoreactive CD4 + T cells may lead to disease-specific treatments. (wiley.com)
  • For epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, and health-care professionals, real-time and predictive modeling of infectious disease is of growing importance. (dymocks.com.au)
  • This book provides a timely and comprehensive introduction to the modeling of infectious diseases in humans and animals, focusing on recent developments as well as more traditional approaches. (dymocks.com.au)
  • It is known that more than 60 percent of the emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic. (org.in)
  • Infections associated with diseases are those that are associated with possible infectious etiologies, that meet the requirements of Koch's postulates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct visualization of the pathogen, the identification of different strains, immunological responses in the host, how the infection is spread and, the combination of these should all be taken into account to determine the probability that an infectious agent is the cause of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • A conclusive determination of a causal role of an infectious agent for in a particular disease using Koch's postulates is desired yet this might not be possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • A list of the more common and well-known diseases associated with infectious pathogens is provided and is not intended to be a complete listing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infectious pathogen-associated diseases include many of the most common and costly chronic illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically, some chronic diseases were linked or associated with infectious pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • These approaches are being used by a number of folks (including us in collaboration with others) in the vision sciences to work with retinal degenerative diseases and this review is a rather nice, concise summary of the approaches and tools used for optogenetics. (utah.edu)
  • Find out more about the degenerative disease- Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (medindia.net)
  • This mini-review summarizes histopathological evidence that DM induces AD pathology in animal models and discusses the possibility that aberrant insulin signaling is a key factor in the induction of AD pathology. (mdpi.com)
  • Companies can help to develop innovative approaches and tools to modify and maintain models to meet new biomedical challenges and needs. (sbir.gov)
  • The present review offers a snapshot of how proteomic techniques have been applied to farm animals to improve their use as biomedical models. (spectroscopynow.com)
  • Additionally, owners constructed a 'hierarchy of purity' for their pets, and it is on this structure of disease and risk that owners base their behaviour, not conventional biomedical models of disease. (animalsandsociety.org)
  • The models have been classified into five main categories based on the methods of induction: gene knockout (KO), transgenic, chemical, adoptive transfer, and spontaneous (each with subcategories). (nih.gov)
  • Four types of HSCR animal models have been developed: teratogen-induced, surgically created, naturally occurring models, and knockout models. (medworm.com)
  • For example: in a murine model, Crohn's disease can be precipitated by a norovirus, but only when both a specific gene variant is present and a certain toxin has damaged the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the World Health Organization, any disease or infection that is naturally transmissible from vertebrate animals to humans and vice-versa is classified as a zoonosis. (org.in)
  • MIM 248200) is the most prevalent inherited macular dystrophy and is associated with disease-causing sequence variants in the gene ABCA4 . (bmj.com)
  • The news comes at a critical time of renewed focus on this most prevalent of neurodegenerative diseases and amid a dearth of medications that prevent, halt or reverse the increasingly common condition. (medicalxpress.com)
  • CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Heart disease remains the most common cause of death in the western world, and cardiac defects are the most prevalent form of birth defect in the United States and Europe. (unchealthcare.org)
  • Past work had shown that one form of familial Parkinson s disease results from a loss of function of a gene called DJ-1. (innovations-report.com)
  • Lysosomal storage diseases are particularly good candidates for gene therapy because, as we show with LAMAN, active enzymes from genetically corrected cells will be secreted into brain tissue and taken up by neighboring cells," Wolfe said. (innovations-report.com)
  • Preclinical studies show that gene therapy can improve muscle strength in small- and large-animal models of a fatal congenital pediatric disease known as X-linked myotubular myopathy. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Two of our dogs treated with adenovirus gene therapy appear almost normal with little, if any, evidence, even microscopically, of disease caused by XLMTM. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Gene Therapy Prolongs Survival and Restores Function in Murine and Canine Models of Myotubular Myopathy," by M.K Childers et al. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Model organism phenotype data represents a highly pertinent but under-utilised resource for such disease gene discovery. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The development of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system has effectively halved the amount of time needed to develop genetically modified animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first genetically modified animal to be commercialised was the GloFish, a Zebra fish with a fluorescent gene added that allows it to glow in the dark under ultraviolet light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exposure to several common environmental toxins, thought to injure neurons through oxidative damage, has been shown to be associated with sporadic forms of Parkinson s disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • However, upon exposure to widely used agricultural agents, including paraquat and rotenone, previously associated with the sporadic form of Parkinson s disease, the flies show strikingly increased sensitivity and death. (innovations-report.com)
  • Since the first murine model of AD was reported one and a half decades ago, many other models have been generated by modification of transgenes that cause familial AD. (springer.com)
  • In 1974 Rudolf Jaenisch created a transgenic mouse by introducing foreign DNA into its embryo, making it the world's first transgenic animal. (wikipedia.org)