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  • HARVEY
  • What kind of chemical contamination has occurred after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma? (sra.org)
  • The newly established Texas A&M University Superfund Research Center ( https://superfund.tamu.edu/ ) investigates the impacts of environmental emergency-related contamination events, such as those that occurred after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. (sra.org)
  • Vikram Kapoor , an assistant professor in The University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been awarded a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to research microbial contaminants in southeast and south central Texas waterways following Hurricane Harvey. (utsa.edu)
  • Our research seeks to understand the extent of wastewater releases during Hurricane Harvey and monitor human exposure to pathogens," Kapoor said. (utsa.edu)
  • The release of these contaminants can pose a threat to humans in the areas affected by the storm, as seen by the two cases of bacterial infections that were traced back to the floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey, one of which ended in the death of a 77-year-old Kingwood, Texas woman. (utsa.edu)
  • For Hurricane Harvey, we see that most of the damage in the Houston area was due to inland flooding caused by record breaking amounts of rainfall in Southeast Texas. (exponent.com)
  • As the energy capital of the country recovers from flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey, the oil and gas industry will begin to assess the impacts to its infrastructure and ask the question: What additional threats need to be considered due to Hurricane Harvey? (exponent.com)
  • The unfortunate truth is that multiple threats may have been created and/or magnified by Harvey, some of which may require an immediate response. (exponent.com)
  • Hazardous
  • Hazardous levels of noise exposure were particularly common among response and recovery workers involved in debris collection, debris reduction, site clearing, and transportation restoration activities. (osha.gov)
  • When workers are exposed to hazardous levels of noise, employers must enroll the workers in a hearing conservation program, similar to the one outlined in 29 CFR 1910.95(c) , OSHA's standard on occupational noise exposure. (osha.gov)
  • Some studies provided information on possible chronic stress occurring in communities near hazardous waste sites. (cdc.gov)
  • and whether neurobehavioral disorders caused by chronic low-dose exposure to neurotoxicants, which may manifest as psychological distress, are a public health phenomenon near hazardous waste sites. (cdc.gov)
  • or chronic exposure, as in residence near a leaking hazardous waste site can cause people to experience psychological uncertainty, worry, and chronic stress. (cdc.gov)
  • Some postulate that the chronic stress documented to occur in some communities near hazardous waste sites could possibly lead to an array of biopsychosocial effects, including physical health effects from chronic stress (possible health outcomes affected by stress include cardiovascular, gastrointestinal disorders, and skin), increases in the prevalence of certain psychological disorders, and social disruption. (cdc.gov)
  • Baum and colleagues then looked for this same chronic stress response in a community located near a leaking hazardous waste site and found similar results. (cdc.gov)
  • formaldehyde exposure
  • In June 2006, FEMA prepared an informal brochure informing trailer occupants of the dangers of formaldehyde exposure, encouraging them to ventilate their units and urging them to seek medical help if they developed health problems related to formaldehyde. (courthousenews.com)
  • Though FEMA knew about formaldehyde levels in trailers between March and June 2006, it allegedly failed to respond to occupants' concerns as part of a deliberate effort to avoid liability for future formaldehyde exposure claims and litigation. (courthousenews.com)
  • toxic
  • It's imperative that the public understands the dangerous present in older homes so they can take necessary precautions against toxic exposures that can occur during disaster scenarios. (simmonsfirm.com)
  • Toxic Chinese drywall in US homes is about 4 times worse than Hurricane Katrina, to mention nothing of the fact that exposure could ultimately kill those who live in these homes, and you and your administration have done little to nothing to help these 100,000's of innocent victims. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The group says, 'toxic Chinese drywall is the absolute worst environmental disaster in US history, and the EPA's testing two houses in Florida is joke. (bio-medicine.org)
  • EPA action is needed to rapidly reduce exposure to toxic chemicals, such as formaldehyde*, which is still in widespread use, particularly in building materials, binders, resins, and composite wood products, used to make everything in a home from carpets to countertops to cabinets to couches. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Irma
  • While cranes are designed for winds that might be expected during a short construction period, Hurricane Irma winds in many areas exceeded these speeds. (exponent.com)
  • contamination
  • The first scientific studies of the health effects of stress associated with environmen al contamination occurred after the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. (cdc.gov)
  • 48 hours will generally support visible and extensive mold growth and should be remediated, and excessive exposure to mold-contaminated materials can cause adverse health effects in susceptible persons regardless of the type of mold or the extent of contamination. (cdc.gov)
  • This position offers excellent exposure to inter-/trans-disciplinary team science, integrating data and expertise across the source-to-outcome continuum to address the critical emerging risk of catastrophic chemical contamination events caused by natural and man-made disasters. (sra.org)
  • Childhood exposure is common, due to indoor air contamination. (saferchemicals.org)
  • EPA's
  • However, HUD's limits of 200 ppb for plywood and 300 ppb for particleboard are 80 to 125 times higher than the California EPA's recommended long-term maximum exposure level of 2.4 ppb. (saferchemicals.org)
  • victims
  • For this purpose, we selected five key stressors: (1) aggression by patients, (2) death of a patient by suicide, (3) mistreatment by colleagues, (4) attendance at disasters, and (5) working with victims of violence. (springer.com)
  • The government's provision of the government-owned EHUs, as implemented by FEMA, was voluntary because it was under no contractual or legal obligation, under the Stafford Act or other federal legislation, to provide the EHUs to disaster victims in response to the disasters. (courthousenews.com)
  • This activity occurs early in the recovery process, but will continue as long as deceased victims continue to be found. (osha.gov)
  • Formaldehyde has recently been recognized by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as potentially causing respiratory illness in hurricane victims housed in FEMA trailers in the Gulf Coast (average level of formaldehyde was 77 ppb and maximum level was 590 ppb). (saferchemicals.org)
  • major
  • The Matrix captures major activities involved in hurricane response and recovery, highlights many of the hazards associated with them, and recommends 'best practices. (osha.gov)
  • When a large-scale, man-made disaster occurs, the support needed is similar to that of a major natural disaster in terms of assessing the needs of those who are affected. (ohsonline.com)
  • While many companies have been more alert and pro-active in preparing for disasters of all types since the September 11, 2001 attacks, a national survey indicates that many employees still don't know what their workplace plan is for major or minor disasters. (nasttpo.org)
  • The United States has averaged over 60 major federally declared disasters annually in the past 10 years. (cdc.gov)
  • The history of Cuba has been prolific on record the passage through its territory of major hurricanes. (eird.org)
  • The Matrix captures major activities involved in hurricane response and recovery, highlights many of the hazards associated with them, and recommends beneficial work practices, personal protective equipment (PPE), and other exposure control methods. (osha.gov)
  • Formaldehyde is also used as a preservative in foods (e.g. certain cheeses, dried food, and fish), though these are not considered major sources of exposure. (saferchemicals.org)
  • survivors
  • Persistently high rates of adverse physical and mental health were reported for all ages from very early after the disaster, with most survivors being undertreated or untreated (1, 2). (aagponline.org)
  • consequence
  • Taking the Loss and Damage debate beyond the contentious issue of compensation to identify the mechanisms needed to address the losses and damages occurring as a consequence of climate change, especially for the poorest and most vulnerable. (practicalaction.org)
  • In a study, this death would not ordinarily be counted as a direct consequence of the disaster, but in actuality it was. (aagponline.org)
  • workplace
  • No matter the type of workplace, disaster planning should take an "all-hazards" approach that demonstrates the flexibility to respond to any disruption in business continuity. (ohsonline.com)
  • Also, learn about the disaster plans at your workplace or other plan where you and your family spend time. (nasttpo.org)
  • Other laws, such as those setting air, water, and workplace safety standards, do not adequately regulate exposure to most chemicals, nor do they address the hazards a chemical may pose over its entire lifecycle. (saferchemicals.org)
  • hazards
  • OSHA monitored the exposures of hurricane response and recovery workers to a variety of hazards including noise, dust (particulates), silica, asbestos, gas and vapors, and metals. (osha.gov)
  • Such a surveillance program will help CDC and state and local public health officials refine the guidelines for exposure avoidance, personal protection, and clean-up and assist health departments to identify unrecognized hazards. (cdc.gov)
  • This activity sheet outlines the hazards that apply to any response and recovery worker involved in recovering human remains and transferring them to a mortuary service facility for identification. (osha.gov)
  • Preparedness
  • Here are 30 Emergency Preparedness and Response tips to help you and your family become better prepared for an emergency. (nasttpo.org)
  • An online course for federal, state, and local public health and other health professionals that highlights preparedness and response resources and tools specific to the field of reproductive health in emergencies. (cdc.gov)
  • This statement was prepared by the AAGP Disaster Preparedness Task Force authorized by the AAGP Board of Directors, and approved by the AAGP Board in November 2008. (aagponline.org)
  • mitigation
  • At one event in the Fiji Pavilion, Practical Action's discussed the role of technology to tackling intolerable risk that remains even after standard disaster risk reduction and mitigation measures have been adopted. (practicalaction.org)
  • Operations
  • Response and recovery operations occurred over a large physical area and encompassed a wide range of specific activities and operations. (osha.gov)
  • Although all the listed operations occurred regularly during this period, debris reduction, recycling, and disposal were the most prominent tasks and, therefore, were the activities where OSHA most frequently evaluated worker exposures. (osha.gov)
  • Operations conducted during the initial response, such as floodwater removal and search and rescue, are not represented in the data summarized here. (osha.gov)
  • diseases
  • NIEHS research uses state-of-the-art science and technology to investigate the interplay between environmental exposures, human biology, genetics, and common diseases to help prevent disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • prevention
  • To assess the impact of storm-related CO exposures and to enhance prevention efforts, CDC analyzed data from five disparate surveillance sources on CO exposures reported during September 13--26 in counties of southeast Texas that were declared disaster areas by the federal government. (cdc.gov)
  • These findings underscore the need for effective prevention messages during storm preparation, warnings, and response periods regarding the correct use of generators and the installation and maintenance of battery-powered CO detectors. (cdc.gov)
  • Evidence is included about assessing exposure, clean-up and prevention, personal protective equipment, health effects, and public health strategies and recommendations. (cdc.gov)
  • FEMA
  • FEMA Disaster website. (cdc.gov)
  • The panel rejected claims that the trailer occupants' taxes amounted to compensation for FEMA's federally subsidized trailers, and it held that FEMA would have immunity because of its conduct "in recovery from an actual disaster. (courthousenews.com)
  • All of his property was flooded or damaged during the hurricane, but he repaired most of it out of his own savings because there was minimal financial help from insurance or the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). (aagponline.org)
  • environmental
  • Some communities receive No Action Assurance letters from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) following a disaster. (asbestos.com)
  • In particular, Center project teams will work to measure "known-unknown" or "unknown-unknown" contaminants in and around the Houston/Galveston Bay area, expanding the current understanding of environmental exposures. (sra.org)
  • Moreover, it will go beyond the "one-chemical-at-a-time" approach by focusing on "whole mixtures," developing approaches that can be applied more generally following natural or man-made environmental disasters. (sra.org)
  • These include use of computational and probabilistic dose-response methods to improve upon existing toxicity values, working with the Center's Exposure Science Core to convert between environmental concentrations and population exposures, working with the Center's Data Science Core to develop computational read-across approaches, and supporting economic impact modeling conducted by collaborators at the University of North Carolina. (sra.org)
  • In all cases, creative thinking and innovation will be needed to move beyond traditional "one-chemical-at-a-time" approaches to addressing whole mixtures in a rapid and efficient manner appropriate for application to environmental disasters. (sra.org)
  • officials
  • Mortality data came from medical examiners, public health officials, and hospitals for deaths in persons residing in counties in the disaster area. (cdc.gov)
  • impacts
  • This new, rapid response report attempts to focus the numerous impacts on the marine environment in order to assess how multiple stresses including climate change might shape the marine world over the coming years and decades. (docplayer.net)
  • carbon
  • Visits were included if "carbon monoxide exposure" or "carbon monoxide poisoning" was listed as the chief complaint and/or ICD-9-CM code 986 was listed as either a working or a final diagnosis. (cdc.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings may occur even within hotels, motels and resorts. (ndri.com)
  • Risk
  • The Hazard Exposure and Risk Assessment Matrix for Hurricane Response and Recovery Work provides a general overview of particular topics related to current OSHA standards. (osha.gov)
  • Loss and Damage remains a political concept, developed during the UNFCCC negotiations, but with its technical roots in climate adaptation and disaster risk reduction. (practicalaction.org)
  • In most cases, depending on the risk factors above, distressing responses are temporary. (ymcahouston.org)
  • Structures located along the coastlines of hurricane-prone regions such as the U.S. Gulf Coast and Eastern Seaboard are at great risk during large storm events (including hurricanes) because of high water levels, which have the potential to inundate vast areas. (exponent.com)
  • recovery
  • It is intended as a guide and quick reference for employers and response and recovery workers. (osha.gov)
  • These events are not clear-cut, easily defined disasters, and the slow onset and recovery may make the adjustment more difficult (17). (cdc.gov)
  • On-going stress from the secondary effects of disaster, such as temporarily living elsewhere, loss of friends and social networks, loss of personal property, parental unemployment, and costs incurred during recovery to return the family to pre-disaster life and living conditions. (ymcahouston.org)
  • Response and recovery workers typically recover human remains by manually transferring them to a body bag and stretcher. (osha.gov)
  • this will help ensure that the animal remains stay intact and response and recovery workers will have less contact with body fluids. (osha.gov)
  • Response and recovery workers might need to shift debris, work in water, or enter enclosed areas to access remains. (osha.gov)
  • Response and recovery workers conducting this operation may be employed by Federal, State, local, and private employers. (osha.gov)
  • As a consulting firm whose employees spend a great deal of time analyzing "disasters," we understand that recovery will be a long process for everyone involved, fraught with unique challenges and complications. (exponent.com)
  • Impairment of higher intellectual functions, personality changes, cerebellar damage, and severe Parkinsonism may occur and may be delayed by several weeks after apparent recovery. (ndri.com)
  • Climate
  • This is the first time a highly disaster-vulnerable country has been the president of a COP, and hence disaster and climate resilience featured heavily on the agenda. (practicalaction.org)
  • We have developed a policy framework (see above) for the Climate, Disaster and Sustainable Development discourse to inform rethinking Access, Use and Innovation from the perspective of the poor so that technology can be used to reduce loss and damage and contribute to rebalancing climate justice. (practicalaction.org)
  • workers
  • Twenty percent of the 324 workers evaluated had noise exposure levels above OSHA's permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 90 decibels (dBA). (osha.gov)
  • Preparing your Emergency Response Plan and conducting regular drills and exercises will allow you to fine-tune your response so that, should an incident occur, you can quickly respond in a way that best fits the needs of your workers. (ohsonline.com)
  • These trailers continue to be used to house clean up workers for the Gulf oil spill disaster. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Texas
  • On September 13, 2008, Hurricane Ike struck the coast of Texas, leaving approximately 2.3 million households in the southeastern portion of the state without electricity ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that one data source, Texas poison centers, received reports of 54 persons with storm-related CO exposures during the surveillance period. (cdc.gov)
  • NPDS and TDSHS provided CDC with information on all storm-related CO-related calls to poison centers during the surveillance period originating from Texas counties that were declared federal disaster areas. (cdc.gov)
  • emergency
  • He and Vice President Biden will take steps to ensure that the federal government will never again allow such catastrophic failures in emergency planning and response to occur. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Your emergency plan should evoke the same response. (ohsonline.com)
  • Choose an emergency contact person outside your area because it may be easier to call long distance than locally after a local/regional disaster. (nasttpo.org)
  • Working in settings where disasters have occurred and developing emergency care information for pregnant women and their health care providers are priority activities. (cdc.gov)
  • I'm talking about an ongoing low level of exposure that builds up over time, not an emergency level at any one time. (infiniteunknown.net)
  • respiratory
  • Long-term exposure to formaldehyde is known to cause cancer of the nasal passages and throat, leukemia, and other cancers of the respiratory tract. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Death usually occurs when eighty percent of hemoglobin is saturated with CO. Senility, or the co-existence of any respiratory or circulatory deficiency, or of anemia or in association with depressive drugs like barbiturates, and alcohol result in a significant reduction of maximum lethal saturation and death can occur from as little as thirty percent saturation. (ndri.com)
  • time
  • Sample results that were obtained over a period of less than 8 hours are extrapolated to provide an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) by assuming that the same level of exposure continued for the full 8-hour shift. (osha.gov)
  • Transportation operation engineers have a responsibility to ensure that the roadways function at their optimum capacities, in order to evacuate people from disaster areas in the shortest possible time. (hindawi.com)
  • health
  • This report provides information on how to limit exposure to mold and how to identify and prevent mold-related health effects. (cdc.gov)
  • A second goal for the editorial is to discuss the role of the professional virtues in preventing and managing these adversities, with an emphasis on responses at the level of health care organizations and residency training programs. (springer.com)
  • Harville E, Xiong X, Buekens P. Disasters and perinatal health: a systematic review External . (cdc.gov)
  • Post-disaster reproductive health outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • Minimal new information and research on elderly mental health outcomes was generated in the years immediately following the Katrina disaster. (aagponline.org)
  • level
  • Large, man-made disasters are best addressed with a combination of providing the information via communication links and some level of on-site support. (ohsonline.com)
  • debris
  • Stirring up asbestos-containing debris can result in airborne asbestos fibers and exposure is highly likely at that point. (asbestos.com)
  • injuries
  • Direct exposure to the disaster, such as being evacuated, observing injuries to or the death of others, or experiencing injury along with fearing one's life is in danger. (ymcahouston.org)
  • California's regulations - developed more than a decade ago in response to a spate of farmworker deaths - are broadly considered the gold standard, and experts said the state's experience is instructive in terms of what it would take for a national law to prevent thousands of injuries that occur each year. (usatoday.com)
  • human
  • Enhanced greenhouse effect: This occurs when the levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increase owing to human activity. (scribd.com)
  • Human remains are recovered from the disaster site and transferred to an approved facility that provides mortuary services. (osha.gov)
  • physical
  • Disasters can affect access to medical and social services, increase stress, intensify physical work, and expand caregiving duties. (cdc.gov)