Loading...
  • exposure
  • The endocrine disrupting activity of dioxins is thought to occur as a down-stream function of AH receptor activation, with thyroid status in particular being a sensitive marker of exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute effects of single high dose dioxin exposure include wasting syndrome, and typically a delayed death of the animal in 1 to 6 weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cloracne, an acne-like eruption of blackheads, cysts, and pustules, is associated with exposure to pentachlorophenol contaminated with heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dioxin Reassessment Report refers to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's scientific reassessment of the health effects of exposure to dioxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 90 percent of human exposure to dioxins comes through food, mainly animal products, such as dairy, meat, fish, and shellfish. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Dioxins have been characterized by EPA as likely human carcinogens and are anticipated to increase the risk of cancer at background levels of exposure. (ewg.org)
  • Too much time has passed since the initial contamination, and many inhabitants, including Maria, contract chloracne, as much as many other illnesses linked to an excessive exposure to dioxin (kidney failure, liver failure and cancer). (wikipedia.org)
  • EFSA staff ensures the continuity of data collection on dioxins and PCBs, integrating newly generated occurrence and exposure data into existing databases. (europa.eu)
  • With regard to dioxins and PCBs in feed, the CONTAM Panel also considers the level of carry over from feed to foods of animal origin and identifies feed materials which could be considered as sources of exposure. (europa.eu)
  • Exposure to chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) (75 chemicals) occurs mainly from eating food that contains the chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • 2.1 What are the principal source of exposure to dioxins? (greenfacts.org)
  • Sources of human exposure to dioxins include food intake, drinking water, air inhalation and skin contact. (gov.hk)
  • Dietary intake is by far the most important and accounts for over 90% of dioxins exposure. (gov.hk)
  • Accidental exposure to large amount of dioxins could lead to the development of chloracne, a skin condition, excessive body hair and other skin lesions such as skin rashes and skin discolouration. (gov.hk)
  • Long-term exposure to dioxins is linked to impairment of the immune system, reproductive function, endocrine system and the developing nervous system. (gov.hk)
  • To accurately determine the risk of the population due to exposure to dioxins, an exposure assessment needs to be performed. (gov.hk)
  • In evaluating dietary exposure to dioxins, one needs to examine the dioxin levels in different food items and the food consumption amount in the population. (gov.hk)
  • Prevention of excessive exposure to dioxins should start with environmental control. (gov.hk)
  • As dioxins are mainly present in the fatty part of food, consuming low-fat products, trimming fat from meat and meat products, reducing the amount of animal fat used in food preparation and using cooking methods that reduce fat (e.g. broiling, baking) are useful measures to minimise dietary dioxin exposure. (gov.hk)
  • Sources of human exposure to dioxins include food intake, drinking water, air inhalation and skin contact, of which dietary intake is the most important source. (gov.hk)
  • As dioxins are mainly found in fat, the risk of dioxin exposure can be reduced by avoiding foods with a relatively high level of fat. (gov.hk)
  • Many Commonwealth personnel who handled and/or used Agent Orange during, and in the decades after, the conflict suffered from serious exposure to dioxin and Agent Orange, which also caused major soil erosion to areas of Malaya. (wikipedia.org)
  • However the scientific data supporting a causal link between Agent Orange/dioxin exposure and birth defects is controversial and weak, in part due to poor methodology. (wikipedia.org)
  • PCBs
  • They are mostly by-products of various industrial processes - or, in case of dioxin-like PCBs and PBBs, part of intentionally produced mixtures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under certain conditions PCBs may form dibenzofurans/dioxins through partial oxidation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidents of contamination with PCBs are also often reported as dioxin contamination incidents since it is this toxic characteristic which is of most public and regulatory concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • The then Flemish Liberals and Democrats (VLD) opposition leader Guy Verhofstadt claimed that the government was trying to cover up the so-called "nota Destickere", which proved that several secretaries of state were informed much earlier that the food contained PCBs and dioxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic chemicals that persist in the environment and accumulate in the food chain. (europa.eu)
  • In contrast to dioxins, PCBs had widespread use in numerous industrial applications, and were produced in large quantities for several decades with an estimated total world production of 1.2-1.5 million tonnes, until they were banned in most countries by the 1980s. (europa.eu)
  • Dioxins and PCBs are found at low levels in many foods. (europa.eu)
  • Dioxins and some PCBs referred to as dioxin-like PCBs (due to their similar toxicological properties) are often considered together within the context of public health. (europa.eu)
  • EFSA collects and analyses occurrence data on dioxins and PCBs in food and feed. (europa.eu)
  • It produces bi-annual monitoring reports on the levels of dioxins and PCBs in food and feed. (europa.eu)
  • EFSA's Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) provides risk managers with scientific advice to inform their decision-making on the setting of maximum levels of dioxins and PCBs in food and feed. (europa.eu)
  • EFSA provides scientific advice and risk assessments on dioxins and PCBs for EU risk managers to help them assess the need for regulatory measures as regards the safety of contaminated food and feed. (europa.eu)
  • Make recommendations for the collection of further data on dioxins and PCBs that enable the refinement of risk assessments. (europa.eu)
  • EU-wide data on the presence of dioxins and PCBs in the food chain are collected and analysed in bi-annual reports. (europa.eu)
  • In 2001, the European Union adopted a strategy on dioxins and PCBs aimed at reducing contamination levels of these substances in the environment, in feed and in foodstuffs in order to ensure a high level of public health protection. (europa.eu)
  • In 2001, the European Commission set for the first time maximum levels for dioxins, which were extended to dioxin-like PCBs in 2006. (europa.eu)
  • Regulation EU 1259/2011 and Regulation EU 277/2012 recently updated them and set maximum levels for non dioxin-like PCBs in food and feed respectively. (europa.eu)
  • These regulations took account of recent data on the presence of dioxins and PCBs in food and feed published in two EFSA scientific monitoring reports in 2010, as well as an EFSA scientific opinion on the presence of non dioxin-like PCBs in feed and food. (europa.eu)
  • Member States are responsible for the monitoring of the levels of dioxins and PCBs in food. (europa.eu)
  • In 2010, EFSA received the mandate from the European Commission to collect and analyse, on a continuous basis, all available data on dioxins and PCBs in food and feed. (europa.eu)
  • If the dioxin-like PCBs (non-ortho and mono-ortho PCBs) are also considered, the daily TEQ intake can be a factor of 2-3 higher. (greenfacts.org)
  • Some PCBs share a structural similarity and toxic mode of action with dioxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Noncoplanar Noncoplanar PCBs, with chlorine atoms at the ortho positions can cause neurotoxic and immunotoxic effects, but only at concentrations much higher than those normally associated with dioxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • PCDD
  • A special version of the HYSPLIT model has been developed to simulate the atmospheric fate and transport of semivolatile pollutants such as PCDD/F (dioxin). (noaa.gov)
  • 2001
  • In 2001, a public report announced that high dioxin levels were detected in Belgians' blood plasma compared to other European populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • compound
  • For example, dibenzo-1,4-dioxin is a compound whose structure consists of two benzo- groups fused onto a 1,4-dioxin ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was subsequently shown that the initial compound was not a derivative of 1,2-dioxin, but a thermodynamically more stable dione. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental Protec
  • In the last 30 years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other bodies have reduced the production of dioxin levels in the U.S. by 90 percent . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Meanwhile, the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to soon release its long-awaited report on dioxin's health hazards, and by most accounts, it will say that dioxin is more dangerous than current regulations assume. (loe.org)
  • industrial processes
  • Drinking water can contain dioxins if it has been contaminated by chemical waste from factories, or by other industrial processes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Dioxins have no technological or other use, but are generated in a number of thermal and industrial processes as unwanted and often unavoidable by-products. (europa.eu)
  • toxic effects
  • While the affinity of dioxins and related industrial toxicants to this receptor may not fully explain all their toxic effects including immunotoxicity, endocrine effects and tumor promotion, toxic responses appear to be typically dose-dependent within certain concentration ranges. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientific
  • To make matters worse, the scientific community reveals that dioxin is a potential risk for the pregnant women, since it can provoke malformations and mental diseases on the fetuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • National Academy
  • This involved a 2003 review of the reassessment by the Interagency Working Group on Dioxin (Dioxin IWG), who recommended a further review by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). (wikipedia.org)
  • cleanup
  • Dow says there's no danger and the state has proposed easing dioxin cleanup standards. (loe.org)
  • levels
  • Plants, water, and air all contain low levels of dioxins. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Volcanoes, forest fires, and other natural sources have always given off dioxins, but in the 20th century, industrial practices have caused the levels to rise dramatically. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In 2008, contaminated animal feed led to pork products from Ireland containing over 200 times the permitted levels of dioxins. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In Hong Kong , the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department initiates follow up action for foods found to contain high levels of dioxins in the food surveillance program. (gov.hk)
  • For years, environmentalists in Michigan have been pressuring the state to clean up what they say are dangerous levels of dioxin in the soil of Midland, where Dow Chemical Company is headquartered. (loe.org)
  • Years ago, soil sampling in Midland, Michigan revealed high levels of dioxin on the grounds of Dow Chemical and in nearby playgrounds and parks. (loe.org)
  • inhalation
  • And there are other ways to be exposed to dioxin in soil, including inhalation and absorption through the skin, although Dow also downplays the dangers posed by those pathways. (loe.org)
  • group
  • The U.S.-Vietnam Dialogue Group on Agent Orange/Dioxin was formally established in February 2007 as an initiative of prominent private citizens, scientists and policy-makers on both the Vietnamese and US sides, working on issues that the two countries' governments have found difficult to address. (wikipedia.org)
  • On June 16, 2010, members of the U.S.-Vietnam Dialogue Group on Agent Orange/Dioxin unveiled a comprehensive 10-year Declaration and Plan of Action to address the toxic legacy of Agent Orange and other herbicides in Vietnam. (wikipedia.org)
  • They do not activate the AhR, and are not considered part of the dioxin group. (wikipedia.org)
  • enters
  • When a dioxin enters the cell and binds to the AH receptor, a complex is formed with another protein, ARNKT[dubious - discuss]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dioxin enters the body by attaching to a protein called the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • concern
  • Some dioxin-related food crises occurred in overseas countries have raised considerable public attention and concern. (gov.hk)
  • Laboratory
  • Laboratory analysis confirmed the presence of dioxin-like toxins well above normal limits in the eggs, tissues and feed of the affected birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The main characteristics of dioxins are that they are virtually insoluble in water but have a high affinity for lipids. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • This map displays locations where Chlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) is known to be present. (cdc.gov)
  • Agent Orange
  • And dioxins from its chemical plant came from making such products as saran wrap, Agent Orange, and various pesticides. (loe.org)
  • The statement urges the U.S. government to take the Plan of Action's recommendations into account in developing a multi-year plan of activities to address the Agent Orange/dioxin legacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • The estimated dioxins intake is then compared with the PTMI established by JECFA to assess the associated health risk. (gov.hk)